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Caltech Y Friends Webinar: "Finding the Right Words: A Memoir about Alzheimer's, Literature, & Neurology"

Tuesday, June 22, 2021
5:00pm to 6:00pm
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Online Event
Finding the Right Words: A Memoir about Alzheimer's, Literature, & Neurology
Cindy Weinstein, Eli and Edythe Broad Professor of English; Vice Provost; Chief Diversity Officer, Caltech,
Bruce Miller, A.W. and Mary Margaret Clausen Distinguished Professor in Neurology; Director, Memory and Aging Cente; Co-Director, Global Brain Health Institute, UC San Francisco,
  • Public Event

Join us as Dr. Cindy Weinstein and Dr. Bruce Miller discuss writing a memoir that combines literature and neurology in order to tell the story of Cindy's father's early onset Alzheimer's Disease. Finding the Right Words: A Story of Literature, Grief, and the Brain (forthcoming Johns Hopkins University Press, September 2021) guides readers through the emotions and grief that many families experience, while giving them knowledge about dementia that they need to care for their loved ones.

▶︎ REGISTER TO ATTEND

This webinar is free, but please register to guarantee your spot. The Zoom link will be sent to registrants a few days before the event.

The Caltech Y is an independent, student-driven non-profit that relies on contributions from individuals and organizations. Please consider joining the Caltech Y family and become a Friend of the Y.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Dr. Cindy Weinstein is the Eli and Edythe Broad Professor of American Literature at the California Institute of Technology. In addition to writing Finding the Right Words: A Story of Literature, Grief, and the Brain with Dr. Bruce Miller, she has written three monographs and edited four volumes on American literature. She teaches courses in women's fiction, Black literature, Herman Melville, and Edgar Allan Poe. She is currently Vice Provost and Chief Diversity Officer.

Dr. Bruce Miller holds the A.W. and Mary Margaret Clausen Distinguished Professorship in Neurology at UC San Francisco, where he directs the Memory and Aging Center. As a behavioral neurologist whose work emphasizes brain-behavior relationships, he has reported on the emergence of artistic ability, personality, cognition, and emotion with the onset of neurodegenerative disease. He is the principal investigator of the NIH-sponsored Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and program project on frontotemporal dementia. Additionally, he helps lead the Tau Consortium, the Bluefield Project to Cure Frontotemporal Dementia, and the Global Brain Health Institute. He was awarded the Potamkin Prize from the American Academy of Neurology, and has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.