12/09/2004 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Bose-Einstein condensates are enigmatic states of matter in which huge numbers of particles occupy the same quantum state and, for all intents and purposes, lose their individual identity. Predicted long ago by Albert Einstein and Satyendranath Bose, these bizarre condensates have recently become one of the hottest topics in physics research worldwide.
 
12/06/2004 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
In a demonstration that holds promise for future advances in nanotechnology, California Institute of Technology computer scientists have succeeded in building a DNA crystal that computes as it grows. As the computation proceeds, it creates a triangular fractal pattern in the DNA crystal.
 
11/24/2004 08:00:00

For the second consecutive year, the "High Energy Physics" team of physicists, computer scientists, and network engineers have won the Supercomputing Bandwidth Challenge with a sustained data transfer of 101 gigabits per second (Gbps) between Pittsburgh and Los Angeles. This is more than four times faster than last year's record of 23.2 gigabits per second, which was set by the same team.

 
11/04/2004 08:00:00
Jill Perry

The Hale Telescope on Palomar Mountain has been gathering light from the depths of the universe for 55 years. It finally sent some back early last week as a team of astronomers from the California Institute of Technology, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of Chicago created an artificial star by propagating a 4-watt laser beam out from the Hale Telescope and up into the night sky.

 
11/04/2004 08:00:00
Marcus Woo

Nicotine is responsible for more than four million smoking-related deaths each year. Yet people still smoke. Why? One reason is the stranglehold of addiction, started when nicotine enhances the release of a neurotransmitter called dopamine, a chemical messenger that induces a feeling of pleasure. That's what smoking, presumably, is all about.

 
11/03/2004 08:00:00
Deborah Williams-Hedges
When it comes to mitigating the harmful impacts of environmental pollution--size does matter . . . or, at least, that's the hypothesis that California Institute of Technology professors Janet Hering and Richard Flagan will be testing.
 
10/29/2004 07:00:00
Jill Perry

The California Institute of Technology has launched a university-wide initiative called Information Science and Technology (IST)--drawing back the curtain on the nature of information itself and redefining the way we approach, understand, and use science and engineering. IST will cut across disciplines, eventually involving over 25 percent of all faculty and nearly 35 percent of students on campus, likely altering the Institute's intellectual and organizational landscape.

 
10/27/2004 07:00:00
Marcus Woo

Thanks to a $13,254,000 grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Caltech has established the Tectonic Observatory, under the direction of Avouac, with the ultimate goal, he says, of "providing a new view of how and why the earth's crust is deforming over timescales ranging from a few tens of seconds, the typical duration of an earthquake, to several tens of million of years."

 
10/22/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol

Writing in the current issue of the journal Science, Institute for Systems Biology immunologist and technologist Leroy Hood and California Institute of Technology chemist Jim Heath and their colleagues explain how a new approach to the way that biological information is gathered and processed could soon lead to breakthroughs in the prevention and early treatment of a number of diseases.

 
10/20/2004 07:00:00
Deborah Williams-Hedges
In response to the arduously slow progress in finding cures for AIDS and cancer, Caltech researchers are now investigating a promising new approach in the treatment of these diseases.
 

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