05/30/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol

Scott Chapman, from the California Institute of Technology, and Rodrigo Ibata, from the Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg in France, have led a team of astronomers in a project to map out the detailed motions of stars in the outskirts of the Andromeda galaxy. Their recent observations with the Keck telescopes show that the tenuous sprinkle of stars extending outward from the galaxy are actually part of the main disk itself.

 
05/25/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
A new study, on the organization of the wholesale electricity market conducted by California Institute of Technology and Purdue University economists, suggests that a plan being considered by the California Energy Commission (CEC) to require electric utility companies to make public their procurement strategies would result in higher costs for utility customers.
 
05/19/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol

Reporting in the May 19 issue of the journal Neuron, David Anderson, Caltech's Roger W. Sperry Professor of Biology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, his graduate student Gloria Choi, and their colleagues describe their discovery that the neural pathway between the amygdala and hypothalamus thought to govern reproductive behaviors is marked by a gene with the rather unromantic name of Lhx6.

05/19/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
The Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of December 26 was an unmitigated human disaster. But three new papers by an international group of experts show that the huge data return could help scientists better understand extremely large earthquakes and the disastrous tsunamis that can be associated with them.
 
04/25/2005 07:00:00
In recent years, seismologists thought they were getting a handle on how an earthquake tends to rupture in a preferred direction along big strike-slip faults like the San Andreas. This is important because the direction of rupture has a profound influence on the distribution of ground shaking. But a new study could undermine their confidence a bit.
 
03/31/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Who do you trust? The question may seem distinctly human--and limited only to "quality" humans, at that--but it turns out that trust is handled by the human brain in pretty much the same way that obtaining a food award is handled by the brain of an insect. In other words, it's all a lot more primitive than we think.
03/27/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Physicists at the California Institute of Technology have created the first nanodevices capable of weighing individual biological molecules. This technology may lead to new forms of molecular identification that are cheaper and faster than existing methods, as well as revolutionary new instruments for proteomics.
 
03/16/2005 08:00:00

By decoding signals coming from neurons, scientists at the California Institute of Technology have confirmed that an area of the brain known as the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vPF) is involved in the planning stages of movement, that instantaneous flicker of time when we contemplate moving a hand or other limb.

03/01/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Those of us who are old enough to remember the Kennedy assassination are usually able to remember the initial announcement almost as if it's a movie running in our heads. That's because there is a well-known tendency for people to have enhanced memory of a highly emotional event, and further, a memory that focuses especially on the "gist" of the event.
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03/01/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Despite the adverse impacts of large dam construction on ecosystems and human settlements, more and more dams are likely to be built in the 21st century wherever there is a need to store water for irrigated agriculture, urban water supplies, and power generation. But world societies and governments would do well to evaluate the consequences of dam construction as an integral part of the planning process, a leading authority writes in a new book.
 

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