Neural Research Shows That the Nose Needs Time To Smell

PASADENA— New research from the California Institute of Technology shows that it literally takes some time to smell the roses.

In the current issue of Nature, Caltech neuroscientists Michael Wehr and Gilles Laurent present work demonstrating that information about odors is contained in the temporal activity patterns of groups of neurons over an interval of time.

Caltech Scientists Offer Theory of Ganymede's Oxygen and Ozone

Tucson, Arizona — When Galileo discovered Ganymede four centuries ago, little did he suspect that the third satellite from Jupiter might be glazed over with the very substance he was breathing.

It took modern astronomical instruments and chemical knowledge for scientists to detect the oxygen and ozone that coat Ganymede. Now, two planetary scientists affiliated with the California Institute of Technology have developed a theory to account for the presence of the substances, as well as the mechanism by which their concentrations are maintained.

Caltech Seismo Lab Gets Location Data on October 3 Meteor

PASADENA— Caltech seismologist Kate Hutton has some data that shows where the October 3 meteor may have landed. She's providing the information publicly to help anyone and everyone who wants to try for the $5,000 reward UCLA is offering.

Thundercloud Photos, Theory Suggest That Jupiter Is "Wet" After All

PASADENA— The Galileo probe that dropped into Jupiter's atmosphere last December detected a surprisingly small amount of water. But scientists at the California Institute of Technology have new thundercloud photographs and a theory to suggest that the solar system's largest planet may be "wet" after all.

Caltech Biologists Identify Gene Thought to Initiate Neural Development

PASADENA— Biologists have identified a gene that determines whether a given cell in a human or animal embryo will become a neuron rather than some other kind of cell.

Question of the Month: How Do We Know That a Rock Found In the Ice In Antarctica Came From Mars?

Submitted by: Audra Martin, La Puente

Answered by: Bill Bottke, Postdoctoral Fellow, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences

The short answer is that we do not know where the moon came from. It's difficult to know, because we have too few examples. Earth is the only terrestrial planet (that is, the only planet within the inner solar system, and made of rock as opposed to gas) that has a large satellite.How do we know that meteorites come from Mars?

New Diagnostic Test Announced for Group of Brain Diseases

Scientists have developed a simple diagnostic test for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), a group of invariably fatal brain diseases that include "Mad Cow" disease in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and kuru in humans. New Diagnostic Test Announced for Group of Brain Diseases September 1996 96

New Research Shows How the Eyes Help the Body Navigate

Neuroscientists have new results on how our brains and eyes work together in getting our bodies from point A to point B without mishap. The research appears in today's issue of the journal Science. New Research Shows How the Eyes Help the Body Navigate September 1996 96

Question of the month: Why do magnets stick to other magnets?

Question of the Month Question from: Matthew, age 8 1/2, Pasadena

Answered by: Doug Michael, PhD, Senior Research Fellow in Physics

Magnets stick together because they have a magnetic field around them, and this field both pulls on and pushes away other magnets.

If you've played with magnets like those that stick to your refrigerator, you know that sometimes they stick to each other, but that they also can push each other away, depending on which way the magnets are pointing.

Question of the month: Why is there so much gravel in the San Gabriel Valley, especially around Irwindale?

Question of the Month Answered by: Lee Silver, W. M. Keck Foundation Professor for Resource Geology

The San Gabriel Valley contains huge amounts of gravel because the San Gabriel River carries broken rock out of the nearby San Gabriel Mountains. The San Gabriels produce especially large amounts of gravel for several reasons.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - research_news