10/27/2004 07:00:00
Marcus Woo

Thanks to a $13,254,000 grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Caltech has established the Tectonic Observatory, under the direction of Avouac, with the ultimate goal, he says, of "providing a new view of how and why the earth's crust is deforming over timescales ranging from a few tens of seconds, the typical duration of an earthquake, to several tens of million of years."

 
10/22/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol

Writing in the current issue of the journal Science, Institute for Systems Biology immunologist and technologist Leroy Hood and California Institute of Technology chemist Jim Heath and their colleagues explain how a new approach to the way that biological information is gathered and processed could soon lead to breakthroughs in the prevention and early treatment of a number of diseases.

 
10/20/2004 07:00:00
Deborah Williams-Hedges
In response to the arduously slow progress in finding cures for AIDS and cancer, Caltech researchers are now investigating a promising new approach in the treatment of these diseases.
 
10/14/2004 07:00:00
Marcus Woo

Sossina Haile, an associate professor of materials science and chemical engineering at the California Institute of Technology, is an expert in fuel cells, and she has been whittling away at the heat problem for years. Now she and her colleagues have not only solved the problem, they've smashed it. They've brought the temperature down to about 600 degrees Celsius (1100 degrees Fahrenheit), while achieving more power output than others are achieving at the higher temperatures--about 1 watt per square centimeter of fuel cell area.

 
10/07/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Cosmologists from the California Institute of Technology have used observations probing back to the remote epoch of the universe when atoms were first forming to detect movements among the seeds that gave rise to clusters of galaxies. The new results show the motion of primordial matter on its way to forming galaxy clusters and superclusters. The observations were obtained with an instrument high in the Chilean Andes known as the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI), and they provide new confidence in the accuracy of the standard model of the early universe in which rapid inflation occurred a brief instant after the Big Bang.
 
10/06/2004 07:00:00
Biologist Erin Schuman is interested in how memories are formed--or forgotten. The landscape the professor of biology at the California Institute of Technology explores is the hippocampus, the part of the brain known to be crucial for memory in humans and other animals.
10/01/2004 07:00:00

PASADENA, Calif. - "Sometimes letting nature tell you what's important is the better way to go," says Raymond Deshaies, an associate professor of biology at the California Institute of Technology.

 
09/20/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
When it comes to finding a used book on the Internet, one merely needs to Google the title, and a few suitable items for sale will soon be just a click away. But for the biologist or medical researcher looking for information on how two nematode genes interrelate in hopes of better understanding human disease, there is a clear need for a more focused search engine.
 
09/15/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
If you think it doesn't do much good to swipe the fly that's going after the potato salad, guess again. You may be discouraging the fly's colleagues from taking up the raid.
09/01/2004 07:00:00
Physicists for several years have been predicting a new age of semiconductor devices that operate by subtle changes in the orientation of electron spins. Known as "spintronics," the field relies on an intricate knowledge of the magnetic properties of materials and of how magnetic moments can be manipulated.
 

Pages