02/19/2004 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Planetary scientists at the California Institute of Technology and Yale University on Tuesday night discovered a new planetoid in the outer fringes of the solar system.
 
02/15/2004 08:00:00
PASADENA, California--The farthest known object in the universe may have been discovered by a team of astrophysicists using the Keck and Hubble telescopes.
 
02/11/2004 08:00:00
Robert Tindol

PASADENA, Ca.--When you're close to that woman you love this Valentine's Day, her fragrance may cause you to say to yourself, "Hmmm, Chanel No. 5," especially if you're the suave, sophisticated kind.

 
02/09/2004 08:00:00
Marcus Woo
PASADENA, Calif. -- Imagine driving down a twisty mountain road on a dark foggy night. Visibility is near-zero, yet you still can see clearly.
 
01/26/2004 08:00:00

Just as astronomers image very large objects at great distances to understand what makes the universe tick, biologists and chemists need to image very small molecules to understand what makes living systems tick.

 
01/22/2004 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Will Internet voting be a benefit to 21st-century democracy, or could it lead to additional election debacles like the one that occurred in 2000?
 
01/21/2004 08:00:00
Robert Tindol

PASADENA—The cluster of stars known as the Pleiades is one of the most recognizable objects in the night sky, and for millennia has been celebrated in literature and legend.

 
12/11/2003 08:00:00
Robert Tindol

Earth's core–mantle boundary is a place none of us will ever go, but researchers using a special high-velocity cannon have produced results showing there may be molten rock at this interface at about 1,800 miles.

 
12/10/2003 08:00:00
Robert Tindol

PHOENIX, Ariz.--Teams of physicists, computer scientists, and network engineers from Caltech, SLAC, LANL, CERN, Manchester, and Amsterdam joined forces at the Supercomputing 2003 (SC2003) Bandwidth Challenge and captured the Sustained Bandwidth Award for their demonstration of "Distributed partic

 
11/13/2003 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but a new psychophysical study from the California Institute of Technology suggests that the length of the beholding is important, too.
 

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