07/08/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Another milestone has been achieved in the quest to create prosthetic devices operated by brain activity. In the July 9 issue of the journal Science, California Institute of Technology neuroscientists Sam Musallam, Brian Corneil, Bradley Greger, Hans Scherberger, and Richard Andersen report on the Andersen lab's success in getting monkeys to move the cursor on a computer screen by merely thinking about a goal they would like to achieve, and assigning a value to the goal.
06/21/2004 07:00:00
Researchers find that "minis"--miniature excitatory synaptic events--may play an important role in regulating protein synthesis in the brain.
05/27/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Scientists who monitor Earth's reflectance by measuring the moon's "earthshine" have observed unexpectedly large climate fluctuations during the past two decades. By combining eight years of earthshine data with nearly twenty years of partially overlapping satellite cloud data, they have found a gradual decline in Earth's reflectance that became sharper in the last part of the 1990s, perhaps associated with the accelerated global warming in recent years. Surprisingly, the declining reflectance reversed completely in the past three years. Such changes, which are not understood, seem to be a natural variability of Earth's clouds.
 
05/19/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
You're driving along in your car and catch a glimpse of a green SUV out of the corner of your eye. A few seconds later, you glance over, and to your surprise discover that the SUV is actually brown.
 
05/06/2004 07:00:00
Free neutrons are usually pretty speedy customers, buzzing along at a significant fraction of the speed of light. But physicists have created a new process to slow neutrons down to about 15 miles per hour—the pace of a world-class mile runner—which could lead to breakthroughs in understanding the physical universe at its most fundamental level.
 
03/18/2004 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
As if folks living in earthquake country didn't already have enough to worry about, scientists have now identified another rupture phenomenon that can occur during certain types of large earthquakes. The only question now is whether the phenomenon is good, bad, or neutral in terms of human impact.
 
03/15/2004 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
A planetoid more than eight billion miles from Earth has been discovered by researchers led by a scientist at the California Institute of Technology. The new planetoid is more than three times the distance of Pluto, making it by far the most distant body known to orbit the sun.
03/08/2004 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Everybody from the Tarzan fan to the evolutionary biologist knows that our human brain is more like a chimpanzee's than a dog's. But is our brain also more like a tiny lemur's than a lion's?
 
02/19/2004 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Planetary scientists at the California Institute of Technology and Yale University on Tuesday night discovered a new planetoid in the outer fringes of the solar system.
 
02/15/2004 08:00:00
PASADENA, California--The farthest known object in the universe may have been discovered by a team of astrophysicists using the Keck and Hubble telescopes.
 

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