11/13/2003 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but a new psychophysical study from the California Institute of Technology suggests that the length of the beholding is important, too.
 
11/12/2003 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
For the past several decades, astrophysicists have been puzzling over the origin of powerful but seemingly different explosions that light up the cosmos several times a day. A new study this week demonstrates that all three flavors of these cosmic explosions--gamma-ray bursts, X-ray flashes, and certain supernovae of type Ic--are in fact connected by their common explosive energy, suggesting that a single type of phenomenon, the explosion of a massive star, is the culprit. The main difference between them is the "escape route" used by the energy as it flees from the dying star and its newly born black hole.
 
10/28/2003 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Just as Ishmael always returned to the high seas for whales after spending time on land, an atmospheric researcher always returns to the air for new data.
 
10/22/2003 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
A new and improved way to measure light has been unveiled by physicists at the California Institute of Technology and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The technology exploits the strange but predictable characteristics of superconductivity, and has a number of properties that should lead to uses in a variety of fields, from medicine to astrophysics.
 
09/22/2003 07:00:00
Mike Brown uses Robinson scope to find weather on Titan.
 
09/17/2003 07:00:00
There may be no giant monitor in the control room that one normally sees in the movies about space exploration, but the new Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) Science Center is an indication of how much has been achieved in the long quest to make space-based astrophysical observation an every
 
09/08/2003 07:00:00
Robert Tindol

First there was liquid metal, that wondrous substance from Bill Johnson's materials science lab at Caltech that is now used for golf clubs and tennis rackets. Now a couple of Johnson's enterprising grad students have come up with a new invention-liquid metal foam.

 
08/20/2003 07:00:00
Robert Tindol

Two months after a pivotal study on the potential impact of a future hydrogen economy on the environment, further evidence is emerging on what would happen to new quantities of hydrogen released into the atmosphere through human activity.

 
07/31/2003 07:00:00
PASADENA, Calif. — In trying to predict where earthquakes will occur, few people would think to look at Earth's gravity field.
 
07/29/2003 07:00:00
Photos available at http://www.astro.caltech.edu/palomar/oschin_telescope.htm

PALOMAR Mountain, Calif. — A major new sky survey has begun at the Palomar Observatory.

 

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