Caltech Question of the Month: Is January 1, 2000, the first day of the last year of the 20th century, or the first day of the 21st century?

Submitted by Eileen Wise, Pasadena California, and answered by Dr. Kevin C. Knox, Ahmanson Postdoctoral Instructor in History at Caltech.

Domesticated wolves may have given humans the leg up in conquering the early world

When early humans first encountered wolves after leaving Africa 140,000 years ago, the two species may have established a partnership that allowed Homo sapiens to eventually dominate the entire world, a Caltech biologist says in a new book.

Caltech Question of the Month: When a plane flies from New York to San Francisco, why can't it just idle in midair and wait for the earth to spin San Francisco around underneath it?

Submitted by Norman Arce, San Marino.

Answered by Dr. Andrew Ingersoll, Professor of Planetary Science, Caltech.

We don't feel it, but the planet is rotating eastward at a rate of about 1,000 miles per hour. Thus, it might make sense that you could rise in the air, stay in one spot, and wait for the West Coast to rotate underneath you in about three hours.

New study explains motions of the Emerson fault in the years following the Landers earthquake

For geophysicists, the 7.3–magnitude Landers earthquake of June 28, 1992 has yielded much in terms of understanding the basic mechanisms of seismic events. A new study appearing in this week's Science provides a new model to explain why the ground near the fault gradually shifted the first few years after the main shock. The work could be used in the future for the analysis of earthquake hazard.

Caltech physicists achieve first bona fide quantum teleportation

Physicists at the California Institute of Technology, joined by an international collaboration, have succeeded in the first true teleportation of a quantum state. Caltech physicists achieve first bona fide quantum teleportation October 1998 98

Multilayered silicon could bea breakthrough for electronic technology

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have found a way to stack silicon layers on chips in a way that could lead to significant new advances in silicon-based electronic devices.

Galileo data shows Jupiter's lightning associated with low-pressure regions

Images of Jupiter's night side taken by the Galileo spacecraft reveal that the planet's lightning is controlled by the large-scale atmospheric circulation and is associated with low-pressure regions.

Caltech Question of the Month: Is there any such thing as "earthquake weather"?

There is a popular notion that earthquakes happen more often in certain kinds of weather. Unfortunately, the description of the preferred weather varies geographically and with the person providing the description.

Crust of Tibetan Plateau is being squeezed by India and Asia, new study shows

Geophysicists have discovered why there are high plains and mountains in the Himalayas for trekkers to trek on. According to new data, the soft crust of the Tibetan Plateau is being squeezed like an accordion between the harder crusts of India and Asia.

Mechanism of cell suicide determined by Caltech, MIT researchers

Biologists at MIT and Caltech have uncovered the chemical details of a mechanism that cells use to commit suicide. The work appears in the August 28 issue of the journal Science. Mechanism of cell suicide determined by Caltech, MIT researchers

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