10/06/2004 07:00:00
Biologist Erin Schuman is interested in how memories are formed--or forgotten. The landscape the professor of biology at the California Institute of Technology explores is the hippocampus, the part of the brain known to be crucial for memory in humans and other animals.
 
10/01/2004 07:00:00

PASADENA, Calif. - "Sometimes letting nature tell you what's important is the better way to go," says Raymond Deshaies, an associate professor of biology at the California Institute of Technology.

 
09/20/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
When it comes to finding a used book on the Internet, one merely needs to Google the title, and a few suitable items for sale will soon be just a click away. But for the biologist or medical researcher looking for information on how two nematode genes interrelate in hopes of better understanding human disease, there is a clear need for a more focused search engine.
 
09/15/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
If you think it doesn't do much good to swipe the fly that's going after the potato salad, guess again. You may be discouraging the fly's colleagues from taking up the raid.
 
09/01/2004 07:00:00
Physicists for several years have been predicting a new age of semiconductor devices that operate by subtle changes in the orientation of electron spins. Known as "spintronics," the field relies on an intricate knowledge of the magnetic properties of materials and of how magnetic moments can be manipulated.
 
09/01/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Scientists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), along with colleagues at AMD, Cisco, Microsoft Research, Newisys, and S2io have set a new Internet2 land-speed record. The team transferred 859 gigabytes of data in less than 17 minutes at a rate of 6.63 gigabits per second between the CERN facility in Geneva, Switzerland, and Caltech in Pasadena, California, a distance of more than 15,766 kilometers. The speed is equivalent to transferring a full-length DVD movie in just four seconds.
 
08/22/2004 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Geobiologists are announcing today their first major success in using a novel method of "growing" bacteria-infested rocks in order to study early life forms. The research could be a significant tool for use in better understanding the history of life on Earth, and perhaps could also be useful in astrobiology.
 
08/12/2004 07:00:00
Chemists at the California Institute of Technology have succeeded in devising a new method for building carbohydrate molecules in a simple and straightforward way that requires very few steps. The new synthesis strategy should be of benefit to scientists in the areas of chemistry and biology and in the pharmaceutical industry.
 
08/05/2004 07:00:00
Marcus Woo
PASADENA, Calif. — Oriented cell division is a fundamental process in developing organisms, whether you are a worm, a fruit fly--or a human. As an embryo begins to grow, cells divide again and again, from the single fertilized egg to the countless cells present at birth.
 
08/04/2004 07:00:00
Astronomers have identified a new class of cosmic explosions that are more powerful than supernovae but considerably weaker than most gamma-ray bursts. The discovery strongly suggests a continuum between the two previously-known classes of explosions.
 

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