10/17/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Just ask any geologist. If you're studying the history of a planet and the life forms that may have lived on it, the really good places to look are rugged terrains like canyons and other areas where water, igneous activity, wind, and seismic rumblings have left their respective marks. Flat is not so good.
 
09/30/2005 07:00:00
Kathy Svitil

The newly discovered 10th planet, 2003 UB313, is looking more and more like one of the solar system's major players. It has the heft of a real planet (latest estimates put it at about 20 percent larger than Pluto), a catchy code name (Xena, after the TV warrior princess), and a Guinness Book-ish record of its own (at about 97 astronomical units-or 9 billion miles from the sun-it is the solar system's farthest detected object). And, astronomers from the California Institute of Technology and their colleagues have now discovered, it has a moon.

 
09/27/2005 07:00:00
Jill Perry
Most people-even broadband users-are now familiar with the relatively slow speed of downloading large files off the Internet. Imagine, then, the frustration of scientists working with files a million times larger than the average user ever encounters.
 
09/27/2005 07:00:00
A massive galaxy seen when the universe was only 800 million years old has been discovered by teams of astronomers using NASA's Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes.
 
09/21/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Humans and insects and pond scum-and all other living things on Earth-are constantly evolving. The tiny proteins these living things are built from are also evolving, accumulating mutations mostly one at a time over billions of years. But for reasons that hitherto have been a mystery, some proteins evolve quickly, while others take their sweet time-even when they reside in the same organism.
 
09/12/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol

Scientists using the NASA Swift satellite and several ground-based telescopes, including Palomar Observatory's robotic 60-inch telescope, have detected the most distant explosion yet, a gamma-ray burst from the edge of the visible universe.

 
09/08/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol

When planetary scientists announced on July 29 that they had discovered a new planet larger than Pluto, the news overshadowed the two other objects the group had also found. But all three objects are odd additions to the solar system, and as such could revolutionize our understanding of how our part of the celestial neighborhood evolved.

08/18/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
With gasoline prices hovering at $3 per gallon, probably few Americans need convincing that another energy crisis is imminent. But what precisely is to be done about our future energy needs is still a puzzle. There's talk about a "hydrogen economy," but hydrogen itself poses some formidable challenges.
 
08/01/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol

For several years geologists have been gathering evidence indicating that Earth has gone into a deep freeze on several occasions, with ice covering even the equator and with potentially devastating consequences for life. The theory, known as "Snowball Earth," has been lacking a good explanation for what triggered the global glaciations.

 
08/01/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol

In a new development that could be useful for future electronic devices, applied physicists at the California Institute of Technology have created a tiny disk that vibrates steadily like a tuning fork while it is pumped with light. This is the first micro-mechanical device that has been operated at a steady frequency by the action of photons alone.

 

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