Scientists achieve breakthrough in fuel-cell technology

Gasoline averaging $3 per gallon? Oil drilling in an Alaskan wildlife reserve? A need to relax air quality standards? It seems the long-term future of fossil fuels is bleak. One promising solution scientists have been studying is fuel cells, but they've had limitations too. Now, in the April 19 issue of the science journal Nature, the California Institute of Technology's Sossina M. Haile reports on a new type of fuel cell that may resolve these problems.

Scientists Watch Dark Side of the Moon to Monitor Earth's Climate

Scientists have revived and modernized a nearly forgotten technique for monitoring Earth's climate by carefully observing "earthshine," the ghostly glow of the dark side of the moon.

Earthshine measurements are a useful complement to satellite observations for determining Earth's reflectance of sunlight (its albedo), an important climate parameter. Long-term observations of earthshine thus monitor variations in cloud cover and atmospheric aerosols that play a role in climate change.

Owls perform a type of multiplicationin locating ground prey in dark, study shows

Owls have long been known for their stunning ability to swoop down in total darkness and grab unsuspecting prey for a midnight snack.

In the April 13 issue of the journal Science, neuroscientists from the California Institute of Technology report that an owl locates prey in the dark by processing two auditory signal cues to "compute" the position of the prey. This computation takes place in the midbrain and involves about a thousand specialized neurons.

Seventy Percent of Americans Think Bush'sTax Plans Mainly Benefit Wealthy, Study Shows

Seven in 10 Americans think the Bush administration's proposed tax cuts would mainly benefit the wealthiest taxpayers, according to a national poll conducted by the University of Southern California and the California Institute of Technology's joint Center for the Study of Law and Politics (CSLP).

Distant Massive Explosion Reveals a Hidden Stellar Factory

A gamma-ray burst detected in February has led astronomers to a galaxy where the equivalent of 500 new suns is being formed each year.

The discovery of a new "starburst galaxy," made by researchers from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and the California Institute of Technology, provides support for the theory that gamma-ray bursts are caused by exploding young massive stars. Details of the discovery are being presented today at the Gamma 2001 conference.

Life rebounded quickly after collision 65 million years ago that wiped out dinosaurs

Though the dinosaurs fared poorly in the comet or meteor impact that destroyed two-thirds of all living species 65 million years ago, new evidence shows that various other forms of life rebounded from the catastrophe in a remarkably short period of time.

Researchers progress toward mutating a mousefor studying Parkinson's disease

Some inventors hope to build a better mousetrap, but California Institute of professor of biology Henry Lester's grand goal is to build a better mouse.

Not that the everyday laboratory mouse is inappropriate for a vast variety of biological and biomedical research. But for Parkinson's disease research, it has become clear that a strain of mutant mice with "slight" alterations would be a benefit in future medical studies. And not only would the mutant mice be useful for Parkinson's, but also for studies of anxiety and nicotine addiction.

Odor recognition is a patterned, time-dependent process, research shows

When Hamlet told the courtiers they would eventually

Caltech/MIT Issue Voting Technology Report to Florida Task Force

The Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project has submitted a preliminary report to the task force studying the election in Florida. Their nationwide study of voting machines offers further evidence supporting the task force's call to replace punch card voting in Florida. The statistical analysis also uncovered a more surprising finding: electronic voting, as currently implemented, has performed less well than was widely believed.

Caltech and MIT Join Forces to Create Reliable, Uniform Voting System

Caltech and MIT are joining forces to develop a United States voting system that will be easy to use, reliable, secure and modestly priced, the presidents of the two universities announced today.

"America needs a uniform balloting procedure," said Caltech President David Baltimore and MIT President Charles M. Vest in a letter to Carnegie Corporation of New York President Vartan Gregorian who is recommending the corporation fund the initial research. "This has become painfully obvious in the current national election, but the issue is deeper and broader than one series of events."

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