01/10/2006 08:00:00
Robert Tindol

In the not-too-distant past, the planet Pluto was thought to be an odd bird in the outer reaches of the solar system because it has a moon, Charon, that was formed much like Earth's own moon was formed. But Pluto is getting a lot of company these days. Of the four largest objects in the Kuiper belt, three have one or more moons.

 
12/08/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Do you have second thoughts when ordering a strange-sounding dish at an exotic restaurant? Afraid you'll get fricasseed eye of newt, or something even worse? If you do, it's because certain neurons in the brain are saying that the potential reward for the risk is unknown. These regions of the brain have now been pinpointed by experimental economists at the California Institute of Technology and the University of Iowa College of Medicine.
12/07/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Physicists have managed to "entangle" the physical state of a group of atoms with that of another group of atoms across the room. This research represents an important advance relevant to the foundations of quantum mechanics and to quantum information science, including the possibility of scalable quantum networks (i.e., a quantum Internet) in the future.
 
12/06/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol

Caltech, SLAC, Fermilab, CERN, Michigan, Florida, Brookhaven, Vanderbilt and Partners in the UK, Brazil, Korea and Japan Set 131.6 Gigabit Per Second Mark During the SuperComputing 2005 Bandwidth Challenge

12/01/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
If you can imagine the straw in your soda can being a million times smaller and made of carbon, you pretty much have a mental picture of a carbon nanotube. Scientists have been making them at will for years, but have never gotten the nanotubes to suck up liquid metal to form tiny wires. In fact, conventional wisdom and hundreds of refereed papers say that such is not even possible.
 
11/29/2005 08:00:00
Kathy Svitil
One of the most elusive questions in science has finally been answered: How do bees fly?
 
11/29/2005 08:00:00
Jill Perry
One of the most powerful computer clusters in the academic world has been created at the California Institute of Technology in order to unlock the mysteries of earthquakes.
 
11/21/2005 08:00:00
Kathy Svitil
Alzheimer's disease is a progressive brain disorder that afflicts an estimated 4.5 million Americans and that is characterized by the presence of dense clumps of a small peptide called amyloid-beta in the spaces between neurons.
 
11/14/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
An international team of scientists has announced a new breakthrough in understanding the molecular details of how signals move around in the human brain. The work is basic research, but could help pharmacologists design new drugs for treating a host of neurological disorders, as well as drugs for reducing alcohol and nicotine craving.
11/10/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
The deep-sea corals of the North Atlantic are now recognized as "archives" of Earth's climatic past. Not only are they sensitive to changes in the mineral content of the water during their 100-year lifetimes, but they can also be dated very accurately.
 

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