11/29/2005 08:00:00
Kathy Svitil
One of the most elusive questions in science has finally been answered: How do bees fly?
 
11/29/2005 08:00:00
Jill Perry
One of the most powerful computer clusters in the academic world has been created at the California Institute of Technology in order to unlock the mysteries of earthquakes.
 
11/21/2005 08:00:00
Kathy Svitil
Alzheimer's disease is a progressive brain disorder that afflicts an estimated 4.5 million Americans and that is characterized by the presence of dense clumps of a small peptide called amyloid-beta in the spaces between neurons.
 
11/14/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
An international team of scientists has announced a new breakthrough in understanding the molecular details of how signals move around in the human brain. The work is basic research, but could help pharmacologists design new drugs for treating a host of neurological disorders, as well as drugs for reducing alcohol and nicotine craving.
 
11/10/2005 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
The deep-sea corals of the North Atlantic are now recognized as "archives" of Earth's climatic past. Not only are they sensitive to changes in the mineral content of the water during their 100-year lifetimes, but they can also be dated very accurately.
 
10/24/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Scientists believe that oxygen first showed up in the atmosphere about 2.7 billion years ago. They think it was put there by a one-celled organism called "cyanobacteria," which had recently become the first living thing on Earth to make oxygen from water and sunlight.
 
10/20/2005 07:00:00
Kathy Svitil
Like the little engine that could, geologic activity on the surface of Saturn's moon Titan-maybe outgassing cracks and perhaps icy cryovolcanoes-is belching puffs of methane gas into the atmosphere of the moon, creating clouds.
 
10/19/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
When it comes to longevity, the Spirit and Opportunity rovers on Mars are giving some real competition to the pink bunny from those battery advertisements. The two rovers in a couple of months will celebrate their second anniversary on the red planet, even though their original missions were only 90 days.
 
10/17/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Just ask any geologist. If you're studying the history of a planet and the life forms that may have lived on it, the really good places to look are rugged terrains like canyons and other areas where water, igneous activity, wind, and seismic rumblings have left their respective marks. Flat is not so good.
 
09/30/2005 07:00:00
Kathy Svitil

The newly discovered 10th planet, 2003 UB313, is looking more and more like one of the solar system's major players. It has the heft of a real planet (latest estimates put it at about 20 percent larger than Pluto), a catchy code name (Xena, after the TV warrior princess), and a Guinness Book-ish record of its own (at about 97 astronomical units-or 9 billion miles from the sun-it is the solar system's farthest detected object). And, astronomers from the California Institute of Technology and their colleagues have now discovered, it has a moon.

 

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