Caltech researchers devisenew microdevice for fluid analysis

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology announced today a new paradigm for large-scale integration of microfluidic devices. Using new techniques, they built chips with as many as 6,000 microvalves and up to 1,000 tiny individual chambers.

Humans and chimps have 95 percent DNA compatibility, not 98.5 percent, research shows

Genetic studies for decades have estimated that humans and chimpanzees possess genomes that are about 98.5 percent similar. In other words, of the three billion base pairs along the DNA helix, nearly 99 of every 100 would be exactly identical.

Caltech-MIT Team Finds 35% Improvementin Florida's Voting Technology

If one measures election success by equipment performance alone, Florida's push to get new voting equipment on-line for the 2002 election appears to have paid off. Compared with the performance of equipment in past Florida state primary elections, the new technologies for casting and counting ballots look like clear improvements according to experts at the California Institute of Technology and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Caltech to be part of $15.5-million federal grantto understand how living cells communicate

A California Institute of Technology research group that specializes in distributed information systems has been named one of the collaborators in the Alpha Project, a $15.5-million, five-year program for advancing knowledge of how living cells respond to information and communicate with each other.

The Caltech research group is headed by Jehoshua Bruck, who is the Gordon and Betty Moore Professor of Computation and Neural Systems and Electrical Engineering at Caltech.

Brain oscillations compress odor representations as signals pass through olfactory networks

Most natural smells are complex blends of many individual chemicals. Freshly ground coffee, for example, contains about 300 individual volatile components. A typical perfume also contains tens of ingredients, although the recipes are tightly locked in secret vaults.

The percepts that such complex blends evoke in us are, however, astonishingly singular: ground coffee smells like coffee, not like a hopeless mess of hundreds of ingredients; Gio or Allure also have unique signatures (often associated with other memories).

Caltech geophysicists find four active volcanoes in Andes with innovative satellite radar survey

Four volcanoes in the central Andes mountains of South America, all previously thought to be dormant, must now be considered active due to ground motions detected from space, geophysicists say.

In a paper appearing in the July 11 issue of the journal "Nature", California Institute of Technology geophysics graduate student Matt Pritchard and his faculty adviser, Mark Simons, unveil their analysis of eight years of radar interferometry data taken on 900 volcanoes in the Andes.

Researchers make progress in understanding the basics of high-temperature superconductivity

High-temperature superconductors have long been the darlings of materials science because they can transfer electrical current with no resistance or heat loss. Already demonstrated in technologies such as magnetic sensors, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and microwave filters in cellular-phone base stations, superconductors are potentially one of the greatest technological triumphs of the modern world if they could just be made to operate more reliably at higher temperatures.

Geophysicists Find Sharp-Sides to the African Superplume

Caltech scientists discover that the African superplume has edges that are sharp and distinct, not diffuse and blurred.

Researchers make plasma jets in the labthat closely resemble astrophysical jets

Astrophysical jets are one of the truly exotic sights in the universe. They are usually associated with accretion disks, which are disks of matter spiraling into a central massive object such as a star or a black hole. The jets are very narrow and shoot out along the disk axis for huge distances at incredibly high speeds.

Jets and accretion disks have been observed to accompany widely varying types of astrophysical objects, ranging from proto-star systems to binary stars to galactic nuclei.

Astronomers discover the strongest known magnet in the universe

Astrophysicists at the California Institute of Technology, using the Palomar 200-inch telescope, have uncovered evidence that a special type of pulsar has the strongest magnetic field in the universe.

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