05/10/2006 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
There's a time soon after conception when the stem cells in a tiny area of the embryo called the neural crest are working overtime to build such structures as the dorsal root ganglia, various neurons of the nervous system, and the bones and cartilage of the skull. If things go wrong at this stage, deformities such as cleft palates can occur.
 
05/04/2006 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
An engineer comparing the human adult heart and the embryo heart might never guess that the former developed from the latter. While the adult heart is a fist-shaped organ with chambers and valves, the embryo heart looks more like tube attached to smaller tubes. Physicians and researchers have assumed for years, in fact, that the embryonic heart pumps through peristaltic movements, much as material flows through the digestive system.
 
04/24/2006 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
If a tree falls in the forest and a caveman sees it lying next to a standing tree, what does he do? New evidence suggests that he may proceed to invent the letter "L."
 
04/10/2006 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
An ongoing challenge in biochemistry is getting a handle on protein folding-that is, the way that DNA sequences determine the unique structure and functions of proteins, which then act as "biology's workhorses." Gaining mastery over the construction of proteins will someday lead to breakthroughs in medicine and pharmaceuticals.
 
04/10/2006 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Building on years of research on the way that blood flows through the heart valves, researchers from the California Institute of Technology and Oregon Health Science University have devised a new index for cardiac health based on a simple ultrasound test. The index is now ready for use, and provides a new diagnostic tool for cardiologists in searching for the very early signs of certain heart diseases.
 
04/04/2006 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Physicists from the California Institute of Technology and an international collaboration of scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory have observed the disappearance of muon neutrinos traveling from the lab's site in Illinois to a particle detector in Minnesota. The observation is consistent with an effect known as neutrino oscillation, in which neutrinos change from one kind to another.
 
04/03/2006 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
One of the quests of modern biologists is to understand how cells talk to each other in order to determine where to form major organs. An international team of biologists has solved a part of this puzzle by combining state-of-the-art imaging and mathematical modeling to reveal how plants go about positioning their leaves and flowers.
 
03/30/2006 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
A mere three months after the giant Sumatra-Andaman earthquake and tsunami of December 2004, tragedy struck again when another great earthquake shook the area just to the south, killing over 2,000 Indonesians. Although technically an aftershock of the 2004 event, the 8.7-magnitude Nias-Simeulue earthquake just over a year ago was itself one of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded. Only six others have had greater magnitudes.
 
03/29/2006 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
By studying epileptic patients awaiting brain surgery, neuroscientists for the first time have located single neurons that are involved in recognizing whether a stimulus is new or old. The discovery demonstrates that the human brain not only has neurons for processing new information never seen before, but also neurons to recognize old information that has been seen just once.
03/15/2006 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Most everyone knows that the term "dyslexia" refers to people who can't keep words and letters straight. A rarer term is "dyscalculia," which describes someone who is virtually unable to deal with numbers, much less do complicated math.

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