12/06/2006 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Geologists have uncovered evidence in the oil fields of Oman that explains how Earth could suddenly have changed 540 million years ago to favor the evolution of the single-celled life forms to the multicellular forms we know today.
 
12/04/2006 08:00:00
John Avery
Research by the California Institute of Technology, the University of Southern California, and Indonesian scientists indicates that within the next few decades another big tsunami could flood densely populated sections of western coastal Sumatra, south of those that suffered from the tsunami of December 2004.
 
11/30/2006 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
When it comes to digestive ability, termites have few rivals due to the gut activities that allow them to literally digest a two-by-four. But they do not digest wood by themselves—they are dependent on the 200 or so diverse microbial species that call termite guts home and are found nowhere else in nature.
 
11/28/2006 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Two and a half billion years ago, when our evolutionary ancestors were little more than a twinkle in a bacterium's plasma membrane, the process known as photosynthesis suddenly gained the ability to release molecular oxygen into Earth's atmosphere, causing one of the largest environmental changes in the history of our planet. The organisms assumed responsible were the cyanobacteria, which are known to have evolved the ability to turn water, carbon dioxide, and sunlight into oxygen and sugar, and are still around today as the blue-green algae and the chloroplasts in all green plants.
 
11/14/2006 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
In a development that could potentially benefit victims of degenerative neurological diseases, researchers have succeeded in stimulating the growth of adult neural stem cells. Such cells could then be directed towards repairing one's own brain.
10/26/2006 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has awarded $6.5 million to found the Center for Sustainable Energy Research at the California Institute of Technology. The center will conduct research on solar-driven renewable-energy sources. The six-year grant targets various promising technologies that could result in cheap alternatives to fossil fuels.
 
10/17/2006 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Engineers at the California Institute of Technology have invented an ingenious new method for depositing tiny amounts of materials on surfaces. The researchers say that the technique, known as plasmon-assisted chemical vapor deposition, will add a powerful new tool to the existing battery of techniques used to construct microdevices.
 
10/06/2006 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
A new $4.4-million grant from the National Science Foundation will allow researchers at the California Institute of Technology and the University of California, Berkeley, to develop techniques to turn brain cells on and off in animals as they go about their daily activities, allowing the scientists to understand the details of how brain activity leads to complex behaviors.
10/04/2006 07:00:00
Kathy Svitil
In the 1950s, a revolution began when glass and metal vacuum tubes were replaced with tiny and cheap transistors. Today, for the cost of a single vacuum tube, you can buy a computer chip with literally millions of transistors.
 
10/03/2006 07:00:00
Jill Perry
Caltech scientists have produced the largest astronomical image ever in order to inspire the public with the wonders of space exploration. The image has been reproduced as a giant mural in the new exhibit hall of the landmark Griffith Observatory, which will reopen Nov. 3 after several years of renovation.
 

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