Researchers make plasma jets in the labthat closely resemble astrophysical jets

Astrophysical jets are one of the truly exotic sights in the universe. They are usually associated with accretion disks, which are disks of matter spiraling into a central massive object such as a star or a black hole. The jets are very narrow and shoot out along the disk axis for huge distances at incredibly high speeds.

Jets and accretion disks have been observed to accompany widely varying types of astrophysical objects, ranging from proto-star systems to binary stars to galactic nuclei.

Astronomers discover the strongest known magnet in the universe

Astrophysicists at the California Institute of Technology, using the Palomar 200-inch telescope, have uncovered evidence that a special type of pulsar has the strongest magnetic field in the universe.

Astrophysicists announce surprising discoveryof extremely rare molecule in interstellar space

A rare type of ammonia that includes three atoms of deuterium has been found in a molecular cloud about 1,000 light-years from Earth. The comparative ease of detecting the molecules means there are more of them than previously thought.

In a study appearing in the May 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal Letters, an international team of astronomers reports on the contents of a molecular cloud in the direction of the constellation Perseus. The observations were done with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii.

Cosmic Background Imager uncoversfine details of early universe

Cosmologists from the California Institute of Technology using a special instrument high in the Chilean Andes have uncovered the finest detail seen so far in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB), which originates from the era just 300,000 years after the Big Bang.

Gamma-ray bursts are caused by explosive death of massive stars, new study reveals

In two papers appearing in an upcoming issue of the Astrophysical Journal, an international team of astrophysicists led by Shri Kulkarni of the California Institute of Technology reveals that new data show that supernovae are the source of gamma-ray bursts.

The new information was obtained from a gamma-ray burst that was detected in November and studied by the Hubble Space Telescope, the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Anglo-Australian Telescope, and optical telescopes in Chile.

JPL, Caltech, Smithsonian scientists improve methodology for monitoring HOx radicals

Scientists have unraveled a mystery about hydrogen peroxide that may lead to a more accurate way of measuring a gas that contributes to depletion of Earth's ozone layer.

New Clues to the Processing of Memories

Function of a known pathway to memory in the brain is explained.

Researchers find new clue why Martian wateris found on the north pole, not the south

When astronauts finally land on Mars, a safe bet is that they'll head for northern climes if they intend to spend much time there. That's because nearly all the available water is frozen as ice at the north pole.

Caltech and Purdue scientists determinestructure of the Dengue fever virus

Scientists at the California Institute of Technology and Purdue University have determined the fine-detail structure of the virus that causes dengue fever. This advance could lead to newer and more focused strategies for devising a vaccine to protect the world against a viral illness that causes 20,000 deaths each year.

Reporting in the March 8 issue of the journal Cell, Caltech biology professor James H. Strauss, lead author Richard J. Kuhn of Purdue (a former postdoctoral scholar in Strauss's lab), and Michael G. Rossman and Timothy S. Baker, both of Purdue, describe

Caltech astronomer to search for "hot Jupiters"with off-the-shelf camera lens

In an age when nearly all astronomical work requires really big telescopes, David Charbonneau is something of an anomaly.

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