12/21/2009 23:00:00
Kathy Svitil

Researchers at the Caltech have proposed a new paradigm that should allow scientists to observe quantum behavior in small mechanical systems. Their ideas, described in the early online issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offer a new means of addressing one of the most fascinating issues in quantum mechanics: the nature of quantum superposition and entanglement in progressively larger and more complex systems.

12/17/2009 08:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein

For decades, science texts have told a simple and straightforward story about a particular protein—a transcription factor—that helps the embryo of the fruit fly pattern tissues in a manner that depends on the levels of this factor within individual cells. Now Angelike Stathopoulos and her Caltech colleagues have called that paradigm into question.

12/17/2009 08:00:00
Kathy Svitil

Saturn's largest moon, Titan, looks to be the only place in the solar system—aside from our home planet, Earth—with copious quantities of liquid (largely, liquid methane and ethane) sitting on its surface. According to Caltech planetary astronomer Mike Brown, Earth and Titan share yet another feature, which is inextricably linked with that surface liquid: common fog. 

12/16/2009 18:01:00
Kathy Svitil

Techniques recently invented by researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech)—which allow the real-time, real-space visualization of fleeting changes in the structure of nanoscale matter—have been used to image the evanescent electrical fields produced by the interaction of electrons and photons, and to track changes in atomic-scale structures.

12/06/2009 18:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein

Have you ever found yourself struggling to get your order taken at a crowded bar or lunch counter, only to walk away in disgust as more aggressive customers elbow their way to the front? It turns out that flies do much the same thing, according to biologists from Caltech.

12/05/2009 08:00:00
Jon Weiner

An international team of high-energy physicists, computer scientists, and network engineers led by the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) joined forces to capture the Bandwidth Challenge award for massive data transfers during the SuperComputing 2009 (SC09) conference held in Portland, Oregon.

12/02/2009 18:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein

Researchers from Caltech have been able to view in detail, and for the first time, the previously mysterious process by which long chains of a protein called ubiquitin are added by enzymes called ubiquitin ligases to proteins that control the cell cycle. Ubiquitin chains tag target proteins for destruction by protein-degrading complexes in the cell. Their findings, and the innovative process by which they were obtained, are described in this week's issue of Nature.

11/29/2009 18:00:00
Kathy Svitil

Researchers at Caltech suggest that the eccentricity of Saturn's orbit around the sun may be responsible for the unusually uneven distribution of lakes over the northern and southern polar regions of the planet's largest moon, Titan. A paper describing the theory appears in the November 29th advance online edition of Nature Geoscience

11/25/2009 08:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein

Scientists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have uncovered evidence of a primitive emotion-like behavior in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Their findings, which may be relevant to the relationship between the neurotransmitter dopamine and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), are described in the December issue of the journal Neuron.

11/11/2009 08:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein

The California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Dow Chemical Company today announced a new solar-research collaboration aimed at developing the use of semiconductor materials that are less expensive and more abundant than those used in many of today's solar cells. In addition, they announced the creation of the Dow Chemical Company Graduate Fellowship in Chemical Sciences and Engineering.

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