Gravity Variations Predict Earthquake Behavior

PASADENA, Calif. — In trying to predict where earthquakes will occur, few people would think to look at Earth's gravity field.

New Sky Survey Begins at Palomar Observatory

Photos available at http://www.astro.caltech.edu/palomar/oschin_telescope.htm

PALOMAR Mountain, Calif. — A major new sky survey has begun at the Palomar Observatory. The Palomar-QUEST survey, a collaborative venture between the California Institute of Technology, Yale University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Indiana University, will explore the universe from our solar system out to the most distant quasars, more than 10 billion light-years away.

A Detailed Map of Dark Matter in a Galactic Cluster Reveals How Giant Cosmic Structures Formed

Astrophysicists have had an exceedingly difficult time charting the mysterious stuff called dark matter that permeates the universe because it's--well--dark. Now, a unique "mass map" of a cluster of galaxies shows in unprecedented detail how dark matter is distributed with respect to the shining galaxies.

International Teams Set New Long-range Speed Record with Next-generation Internet Protocol

Scientists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) have set a new Internet2 land speed record using the next-generation Internet protocol IPv6. The team sustained a single stream TCP rate of 983 megabits per second for more than one hour between the CERN facility in Geneva and Chicago, a distance of more than 7,000 kilometers. This is equivalent to transferring a full CD in 5.6 seconds.

The performance is remarkable because it overcomes two important challenges:

Hydrogen economy might impactEarth's stratosphere, study shows

According to conventional wisdom, hydrogen-fueled cars are environmentally friendly because they emit only water vapor -- a naturally abundant atmospheric gas. But leakage of the hydrogen gas that can fuel such cars could cause problems for the upper atmosphere, new research shows.

In an article appearing this week in the journal Science, researchers from the California Institute of Technology report that the leaked hydrogen gas that would inevitably result from a hydrogen economy, if it accumulates, could indirectly cause as much as a 10-percent decrease in atmospheric ozone.

Astronomers "weigh" pulsar's planets

For the first time, the planets orbiting a pulsar have been "weighed" by measuring precisely variations in the time it takes them to complete an orbit, according to a team of astronomers from the California Institute of Technology and Pennsylvania State University.

Reporting at the summer meeting of the American Astronomical Society, Caltech postdoctoral researcher Maciej Konacki and Penn State astronomy professor Alex Wolszczan announced today that masses of two of the three known planets orbiting a rapidly spinning pulsar 1,500 light-years away in the constellation Virgo have been successf

Why Fearful Animals Flee—or Freeze

Mapping and manipulating the neural circuits involved in such innate behaviors as fear.

Caltech biology professor to directresearch program on brain signaling

California Institute of Technology biologist Mary Kennedy has been named project director for a $4 million federal project grant to better understand how the brain processes signals. Progress could lead to new insights into how drugs can be better custom-designed to treat a host of neurodegenerative disorders, mental illnesses, and disabilities, including Alzheimer's disease, depression, and schizophrenia.

The funding will come from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

New Insight Into How Flies Fly

April 18, 2003 Science paper shows that tiny insects use their wings to overcome inertia, and not--as conventional wisdom has held--friction.

Astronomers find new evidence aboutuniverse's heaviest phase of star formation

New distance measurements from faraway galaxies further strengthen the view that the strongest burst of star formation in the universe occurred about two billion years after the Big Bang.

Reporting in the April 17 issue of the journal Nature, California Institute of Technology astronomers Scott Chapman and Andrew Blain, along with their United Kingdom colleagues Ian Smail and Rob Ivison, provide the redshifts of 10 extremely distant galaxies which strongly suggest that the most luminous galaxies ever detected were produced over a rather short period of time.

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