How I Landed on Mars

Caltech geology graduate student Katie Stack says her Caltech experience has provided her with the best of both worlds. Literally. As one of five Caltech graduate students currently staffing the Mars Science Laboratory mission, Stack is simultaneously exploring the geologic pasts of both Mars and Earth. She and her student colleagues apply their knowledge of Earth's history and environment—gleaned from Caltech classes and field sites across the globe—to the analysis of Curiosity's discoveries as well as the hunt for evidence of past life on the Red Planet.

Developmental Bait and Switch

During the early developmental stages of vertebrates—animals that have a backbone and spinal column, including humans—cells undergo extensive rearrangements, and some cells migrate over large distances to populate particular areas and assume novel roles as differentiated cell types. Understanding how and when such cells switch their purpose in an embryo is an important and complex goal for developmental biologists. A recent study, led by researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), provides new clues about this process—at least in the case of neural crest cells, which give rise to most of the peripheral nervous system, to pigment cells, and to large portions of the facial skeleton.

Progress for Paraplegics

Caltech engineers, who last year helped enable a paraplegic man to stand and move his legs voluntarily, have developed a new method to automate the system, which provides epidural electrical stimulation to people with spinal-cord injuries. This advancement could make the technology widely available to rehab clinics and thousands of patients worldwide. It would also reduce the system's training time and costs for hospitals and clinics and make it easier for patients to continue their rehabilitation at home.

Reconsidering the Global Thermostat

Many ideas have been floated about how to potentially manipulate the planet's climate in order to counteract the effects of global warming—a concept known as geoengineering. But because some of these efforts could affect areas of the planet inequitably, geoengineering has often raised an ethical question: Whose hand would control the global thermostat? Now a team of researchers from Caltech, Harvard, and the Carnegie Institution says there doesn't have to be just a single global control.

Technology Has Improved Voting Procedures

Thanks to better voting technology over the last decade, the country's election process has seen much improvement, according to a new report released today by researchers at Caltech and MIT. However, the report notes, despite this progress, some problems remain.

Caltech Modeling Feat Sheds Light on Protein Channel's Function

Chemists at Caltech have managed, for the first time, to simulate the biological function of a channel called the Sec translocon, which allows specific proteins to pass through membranes. The feat required bridging timescales from the realm of nanoseconds all the way up to full minutes, exceeding the scope of earlier simulation efforts by more than six orders of magnitude. The result is a detailed molecular understanding of how the translocon works.

Developing the Next Generation of Microsensors

Setting the stage for a new class of motional sensors, Caltech researchers have developed a new ultrasensitive, microchip-scale accelerometer that uses laser light to measure displacement.

How I Spent My Summer Vacation

Last summer, Caltech junior Julie Jester worked on a project that might one day partially counteract blindness caused by a deteriorating retina. Her job: to help Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Azita Emami and her graduate students create the communications link between a tiny camera and a novel wireless neural stimulator that can be surgically inserted into the eye.

Now in its 34th year, Caltech's Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) program has paired nearly 7,000 students with real-world, hands-on projects in the labs of Caltech faculty and JPL staff.

Traveling with Purpose

Pamela Bjorkman has been studying HIV at Caltech since 2005. In the lab, she has made significant gains in the fight against the virus, developing antibodies that neutralize most strains. But years spent at the bench were beginning to make her feel disconnected from the possible impact of her work. So this summer she visited India, spending time with HIV-positive women and others who are at risk.

Caltech Biologist Named MacArthur Fellow

Sarkis Mazmanian, a microbiology expert at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) whose studies of human gut bacteria have revealed new insights into how these microbes can be beneficial, was named a MacArthur Fellow and awarded a five-year, $500,000 “no strings attached” grant.

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