Physicists Successful in Trapping Ultracold Neutrons at Los Alamos National Laboratory

Free neutrons are usually pretty speedy customers, buzzing along at a significant fraction of the speed of light. But physicists have created a new process to slow neutrons down to about 15 miles per hour—the pace of a world-class mile runner—which could lead to breakthroughs in understanding the physical universe at its most fundamental level.

From Cosmos to Climate, Six Caltech Professors Awarded Sloan Research Fellowships

Six members of the Caltech faculty have received Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowships for 2004.

Caltech, Cornell announce new $2-million study for building giant submillimeter telescope

The California Institute of Technology and Cornell University are in the planning stages for a new 25-meter telescope to be built in Chile. The submillimeter telescope will cost an estimated $60 million and will be nearly two times larger in diameter than the largest submillimeter telescope currently in existence.

Researchers Using Hubble and Keck Telescopes Find Farthest Known Galaxy in the Universe

PASADENA, California--The farthest known object in the universe may have been discovered by a team of astrophysicists using the Keck and Hubble telescopes. The object, a galaxy behind the Abell 2218 cluster, may be so far from Earth that its light would have left when the universe was just 750 million years old.

The discovery demonstrates again that the technique known as gravitational lensing is a powerful tool for better understanding the origin of the universe.

Astronomers measure distance to star celebrated in ancient literature and legend

PASADENA—The cluster of stars known as the Pleiades is one of the most recognizable objects in the night sky, and for millennia has been celebrated in literature and legend. Now, a group of astronomers has obtained a highly accurate distance to one of the stars of the Pleiades known since antiquity as Atlas. The new results will be useful in the longstanding effort to improve the cosmic distance scale, as well as to research the stellar life-cycle.

The coming global peak in oil productionis a grave concern, according to new book

Ancient Persians tipped their fire arrows with it, and Native Americans doctored their ails with it. Any way you look at petroleum, the stuff has been around for a long time. Problem is, it's not going to be around much longer--or at least not in the quantities necessary to keep our Hummers humming.

Moore Foundation Awards Additional $17.5 Million for Thirty-Meter Telescope Plans

PASADENA—The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation awarded $17.5 million to the University of California for collaboration with the California Institute of Technology on a project intended to build the world's most powerful telescope. Coupled with an award by the foundation to Caltech for the same amount, a total of $35 million is now available for the two institutions to collaborate on this visionary project to build the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT).

Caltech, SLAC, and LANL Set New Network Performance Marks

PHOENIX, Ariz.--Teams of physicists, computer scientists, and network engineers from Caltech, SLAC, LANL, CERN, Manchester, and Amsterdam joined forces at the Supercomputing 2003 (SC2003) Bandwidth Challenge and captured the Sustained Bandwidth Award for their demonstration of "Distributed particle physics analysis using ultra-high speed TCP on the Grid," with a record bandwidth mark of 23.2 gigabits per second (or 23.2 billion bits per second).

Gamma-Ray Bursts, X-Ray Flashes, and Supernovae Not As Different As They Appear

For the past several decades, astrophysicists have been puzzling over the origin of powerful but seemingly different explosions that light up the cosmos several times a day. A new study this week demonstrates that all three flavors of these cosmic explosions--gamma-ray bursts, X-ray flashes, and certain supernovae of type Ic--are in fact connected by their common explosive energy, suggesting that a single type of phenomenon, the explosion of a massive star, is the culprit. The main difference between them is the "escape route" used by the energy as it flees from the dying star and its newly born black hole.

Aeronautical Lab Celebrates Its 75th

PASADENA, Calif. – It might seem a bit of a stretch to see what the flight control of a 747 and the way a boxfish maneuvers in very turbulent water have in common. But such thinking is all in a day's work within the walls of the California Institute of Technology's Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories (GALCIT), which this week celebrates its 75th anniversary.

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