Kent and Joyce Kresa Endow Leadership Chair for Caltech’s Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy

Gift will transform back-of-the-napkin ideas into groundbreaking science

The Kent and Joyce Kresa Leadership Chair for Caltech's Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy (PMA) will generate funds to give the division chair agility to respond immediately when singular opportunities arise. The unrestricted $10 million endowment for PMA, one of Caltech's six academic divisions, is named for senior trustee and board chair emeritus Kent Kresa and his late wife, Joyce, who established the fund.

"Kent and Joyce Kresa have given to Caltech as institutional leaders and now as major benefactors," says President Thomas F. Rosenbaum, holder of Caltech's Sonja and William Davidow Presidential Chair and professor of physics. "Deeply understanding the special nature of Caltech, their gift will empower generations of faculty and students to push the boundaries of discovery and change the world."

According to Kresa, the gift's potential impact hinges on a quality that he and his wife found to be unique to Caltech: the fact that such a small place with such a small faculty and student body can do such big science—and make such a big difference in the world.

"Caltech is a nurturer of good ideas and new things," Kresa says. "Of anywhere in the world, the ideas per student and ideas per faculty member are probably the highest at Caltech.

"We wanted to give a gift that would allow the faculty to decide where they should spend the money, and have that available in perpetuity."

B. Thomas Soifer, the inaugural holder of the Kent and Joyce Kresa Leadership Chair, says that this kind of support will have a dramatic impact. "For years, I've kept a wish list—literally a black notebook on my desk—where I capture the most exciting ideas I hear from faculty and students. This gift will transform notes like those into tangible realities by providing unrestricted funds to support groundbreaking projects. The division's greatest contributions to science all started as ventures that Caltech had the foresight to encourage, and the Kresas' gift helps ensure that this will always be true."

Kent Kresa, who is an alumnus of MIT, believes that both universities make an enormous difference in the world. Initially attracted to Caltech by the proximity of a great research institution to his West Coast home, he soon came to appreciate both the distinctive mental stimulation afforded by Caltech's highly collaborative academic environment and his friendships with faculty and staff. During his 21 years as a trustee, he has involved himself deeply, chairing the board from 2005 to 2012 and cofounding the Institute's new Space Innovation Council.

"Over the years, Kent and Joyce have supported Caltech in many diverse and important ways," says Caltech Provost Edward M. Stolper, holder of the Carl and Shirley Larson Provostial Chair and William E. Leonhard Professor of Geology. "In addition to contributing his leadership, expertise, guidance, and wisdom, Kent is one of the Institute's most thoughtful and enthusiastic supporters. It is no surprise to all of us who have known them that Kent and Joyce once again stepped forward to support one of Caltech's most important priorities."

Although the Kresas' most recent gift focuses on PMA, their philanthropy spans divisions at Caltech. In 2009, the couple endowed the Joyce and Kent Kresa Professorship in Engineering and Applied Science. Kent Kresa is intrigued by the work of the current chairholder, Sergio Pellegrino, who is developing small satellites and devices that organize themselves in space.

"There is a lot still to do in aeronautics and astronautics," Kresa says. "I'm thrilled that there are people pushing the envelope."

A member of the National Academy of Engineering and past president of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Kresa worked for Northrop Grumman Corporation for 28 years, ultimately serving as its president, chairman, and CEO. Kresa has served on the boards of many organizations, including the TCW Group, the W. M. Keck Foundation, General Motors—where he was interim chairman—and Avery Dennison—where he was chairman. He also spent years with the MIT Lincoln Laboratory and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Joyce Kresa, trained as a vocalist, became a well-known champion of the arts, education, medicine, and science. She served on the board of the Los Angeles Philharmonic and was president of the Blue Ribbon, a support organization for the Music Center.

After decades of success in aerospace, Kent Kresa sees his latest gift to Caltech as a way to express his thankfulness for a rewarding career in engineering and science and to provide similar opportunities for future generations.

"I can't think of a better place to give back to than a place that will create new things," he says. "For those who have the ability to be philanthropic during their lives or to leave something after their lives are finished, there couldn't be a nicer thing to do than to honor Caltech with some of those resources."

The Kresas join a growing list of donors who have given generously to create leadership chairs that provide funding for the president, provost, and division chairs to use at their discretion. Caltech's other leadership chairs are the Sonja and William Davidow Presidential Chair; the Carl and Shirley Larson Provostial Chair; the Otis Booth Leadership Chair in the Division of Engineering and Applied Science; and the William K. Bowes Jr. Leadership Chair in the Division of Biology and Biological Engineering.

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Caltech Professors Named Fellows of the American Physical Society

John Dabiri and Maria Spiropulu have been named fellows of the American Physical Society (APS) for their exceptional contributions to physics.

The APS Division of Fluid Dynamics nominated Dabiri, professor of aeronautics and bioengineering, for his contributions to "vortex dynamics and biological propulsion, and for pioneering new concepts in wind energy."

Dabiri, the director of the Center for Bioinspired Engineering, studies the mechanics and dynamics of biological propulsion—particularly using jellyfish as a model. His group aims to discover biologically inspired design principles that can be applied in engineering systems.

In addition, Dabiri oversees the Caltech Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy (FLOWE), an experimental wind farm for testing the energy-generating efficiency of various configurations of vertical-axis wind turbines. By optimizing the placement of the wind turbines based on observations of schools of fish, Dabiri and his group demonstrated that power output can be increased tenfold.

Professor of Physics Maria Spiropulu is an experimental particle physicist. She has worked with particle accelerators and detectors for the past 22 years and has pioneered new methods of data analysis in order to learn about the physics of the universe at both astrophysical and atomic scales. She was nominated by the APS Division of Particles and Fields for her work searching for evidence of supersymmetry (a theory that says that every fundamental particle has a supersymmetric partner) and extra dimensions at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab in Illinois. Spiropulu was also noted for her work on the characterization of the Higgs boson—a long-sought fundamental particle thought to give other particles their mass—at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland.

In addition to Dabiri and Spiropulu, 39 other Caltech faculty and researchers have been elected as fellows of the APS since the program began in 1980.

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Caltech Professors Awarded 2015 Sloan Fellowships

Five Caltech faculty members have been named among the 2015 class of Sloan Research Fellows. The fellowships, awarded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, honor "early-career scientists whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders." This year, 126 young scientists were awarded fellowships in eight scientific and technical fields: chemistry, computer science, economics, mathematics, computational and evolutionary biology, neuroscience, ocean sciences, and physics. Candidates must be nominated by a department head or other senior researcher and are reviewed by a selection committee of three distinguished scientists in each field.

Viviana Gradinaru (BS' 05), an assistant professor of biology and the faculty director of the Beckman Institute Pilot Center for Optogenetics and CLARITY, received her fellowship in the area of neuroscience. The CLARITY technique, codeveloped by Gradinaru, is used to render tissues, organs, and even whole organisms transparent. Her research focuses on developing tools and methods for neuroscience as well as investigating the mechanisms underlying deep brain stimulation and its long-term effects on neuronal health, function, and behavior.

Mitchell Guttman, an assistant professor of biology, received the fellowship in the category of computational and evolutionary molecular biology. His work exploring unknown regions of the genome has led to the identification of genes that do not produce proteins, known as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which act as efficient administrators, gathering and organizing key proteins necessary for packaging genetic information and regulating gene expression. Guttman and his colleagues recently discovered that lncRNAs can shape chromosome structure to remodel the genome and pull in necessary target genes, unlike other proteins that must travel to their targets.

Gregg Hallinan, an assistant professor of astronomy, received his fellowship in the physics category. His group studies the universe at radio wavelengths, particularly examining the radio emissions produced by stars and their planets. His team recently completed construction of a new radio telescope at Caltech's Owens Valley Radio Observatory that can survey the entire sky instantaneously. This project aims to deliver the first detection of radio waves produced by the interaction of the magnetic field of an exoplanet—a planet outside our own solar system—with the stellar wind of its host star.

Heather Knutson, an assistant professor of planetary science, received the fellowship in the physics category. She studies the structure, chemistry, and atmospheric dynamics of extrasolar planets. These planets are often classified into broad categories based on their mass and radius. Knutson's research measuring exoplanet temperatures and characterizing atmospheric compositions adds detail to these classifications. She has helped develop many of the techniques that are now used to study exoplanet atmospheric dynamics.

Xinwen Zhu, an associate professor of mathematics, received the fellowship in the mathematics category. His research interests focus on geometric representation theory, in particular the geometric aspects of the Langlands program, a kind of "unified theory of mathematics" linking together many different mathematical fields of research. This research aims to provide a more intuitive visualization of prime numbers by relating the field to diverse topics such as geometry and quantum physics.

Also included among this year's class of fellows are six other Caltech alumni: Brandi Cossairt (BS '06), Jennifer A. Dionne (MS '05, PhD '09), Aaron Esser-Kahn (BS '04), Michael Kesden (PhD '05), Neal Mankad (PhD '10), and Stephanie Waterman (MS '02).

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