Astronomers Observe Planets Around Another Star Like Never Before

PASADENA, Calif.—Thanks to a new high-tech gadget, astronomers have observed four planets orbiting a star relatively close to the sun in unprecedented detail, revealing the roughly ten-Jupiter-mass planets to be among the most exotic ones known.

The team, which includes several researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), describes its findings in a paper accepted for publication by the Astrophysical Journal.

Ryan Patterson Awarded Sloan Research Fellowship

Ryan Patterson, assistant professor of physics at Caltech, is one of 126 young scholars to receive a Sloan Research Fellowship for 2013.

According to the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the purpose of the Sloan Research Fellowships is to "stimulate fundamental research by early-career scientists and scholars of outstanding promise." Candidates are nominated by their fellow scientists and chosen by an independent panel of senior scholars. Fellows receive $50,000 to be used to further their research.

Viewing the Cosmos from the South Pole: An Interview with Jamie Bock

Almost immediately after the Big Bang—roughly after ten trillionths of a trillionth of a trillionth of a second—the universe suddenly grew. Very fast. The entire cosmos, which at the time was smaller than an atom, expanded to the size of a beach ball in less than a millionth of a trillionth of a trillionth of a second—before settling down to a more leisurely rate of growth that continues to this day.

Caltech Senior Wins Churchill Scholarship

Caltech senior Andrew Meng has been selected to receive a Churchill Scholarship, which will fund his graduate studies at the University of Cambridge for the next academic year. Meng, a chemistry and physics major, was one of only 14 students nationwide who were chosen to receive the fellowship this year.

John Johnson Wins Astronomy Prize

John A. Johnson, assistant professor of planetary astronomy at Caltech, received the 2012 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize at the 221st meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS), in Long Beach, California.
Friday, January 25, 2013
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Course Ombudspeople Lunch

A Cloudy Mystery

It's the mystery of the curiously dense cloud. And astronomers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) are on the case. Near the crowded galactic center, where billowing clouds of gas and dust cloak a supermassive black hole three million times as massive as the sun—a black hole whose gravity is strong enough to grip stars that are whipping around it at thousands of kilometers per second—one particular cloud has baffled astronomers. Indeed, the cloud, dubbed G0.253+0.016, defies the rules of star formation.

Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

Professor of Physics Harvey Newman has been searching for signs of dark matter, extra dimensions, and the elusive Higgs particle at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. He'll be reporting from the high-energy frontier of particle physics at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 9, 2013, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.

From Theory to Reality: An Interview with Jason Alicea

Quantum computers—computers that harness the bizarre laws of quantum mechanics to become vastly more powerful than conventional computers—have been touted as the next leap in technology. Although useful quantum-computing technology is probably years—and possibly decades—away, physicists like Jason Alicea, who joined Caltech's faculty this fall as an associate professor of theoretical physics, are working hard to make it a reality. Alicea's research involves translating purely theoretical ideas into real-life experiments and applications. He recently answered a few questions about himself and his research.

A Close Encounter of the First Kind

A new era in planetary science began in 1962, when Mariner 2 and the 200-inch Hale telescope simultaneously took a close look at Venus.

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