Monday, May 23, 2016
Brown Gymnasium – Scott Brown Gymnasium

Animal magnetism

Monday, February 29, 2016
Brown Gymnasium – Scott Brown Gymnasium

Animal magnetism

Thursday, May 26, 2016
Avery House – Avery House

The Mentoring Effect: Conference on Mentoring Undergraduate Researchers

Tuesday, April 12, 2016
Center for Student Services 360 (Workshop Space) – Center for Student Services

TA Workshop: Getting the Biggest ‘Bang for Your Buck’ - Teaching strategies for busy TAs

JPL News: Investigating the Mystery of Migrating '"Hot Jupiters"

The last decade has seen a bonanza of exoplanet discoveries. Nearly 2,000 exoplanets -- planets outside our solar system -- have been confirmed so far, and more than 5,000 candidate exoplanets have been identified. Many of these exotic worlds belong to a class known as "hot Jupiters." These are gas giants like Jupiter but much hotter, with orbits that take them feverishly close to their stars.

At first, hot Jupiters were considered oddballs, since we don't have anything like them in our own solar system. But as more were found, in addition to many other smaller planets that orbit very closely to their stars, our solar system started to seem like the real misfit.

Read the full story from JPL News

Images: 
Home Page Title: 
JPL News: The Mystery of Migrating "Hot Jupiters"
Exclude from News Hub: 
No
News Type: 
Research News
Exclude from Home Page: 
Home Page Summary: 
How do some gas giant planets end up so feverishly close to their stars? NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope finds new clues.
Monday, March 28, 2016 to Friday, April 15, 2016
Center for Student Services 360 (Workshop Space) – Center for Student Services

Spring TA Training -- 2016

JPL News: Astronomers Discover Colossal "Super Spiral" Galaxies

A strange new kind of galactic beast has been spotted in the cosmic wilderness. Dubbed "super spirals," these unprecedented galaxies dwarf our own spiral galaxy, the Milky Way, and compete in size and brightness with the largest galaxies in the universe.

Super spirals have long hidden in plain sight by mimicking the appearance of typical spiral galaxies. A new study using archived NASA data reveals these seemingly nearby objects are in fact distant, behemoth versions of everyday spirals. Rare, super spiral galaxies present researchers with the major mystery of how such giants could have arisen.

"We have found a previously unrecognized class of spiral galaxies that are as luminous and massive as the biggest, brightest galaxies we know of," says Patrick Ogle, an astrophysicist at Caltech's Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) and the lead author of a new paper on the findings published in The Astrophysical Journal. "It's as if we have just discovered a new land animal stomping around that is the size of an elephant but had shockingly gone unnoticed by zoologists."

Read the full story from JPL News

Home Page Title: 
Discovered: Colossal "Super Spiral" Galaxies
Exclude from News Hub: 
No
News Type: 
Research News
Exclude from Home Page: 
Home Page Summary: 
Dubbed "super spirals," these unprecedented galaxies compete in size and brightness with the largest galaxies in the universe.
Wednesday, March 30, 2016
Noyes 147 (J. Holmes Sturdivant Lecture Hall) – Arthur Amos Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics

CPET Spring Seminar with Professor Laura Tucker

Thursday, April 7, 2016
Athenaeum – The Athenaeum

Memorial Service for Charlie Barnes

Quintessentially Caltech

How best to recognize Caltech's own Ahmed Zewail, the Linus Pauling Professor of Chemistry and professor of physics, and director of the Physical Biology Center for Ultrafast Science and Technology, who has served on Caltech's faculty for 40 years? President Thomas F. Rosenbaum had the answer: what he would later call a "quintessentially Caltech conference."

And so, on Friday, February 26, more than 1,000 people gathered to hear exceptional researchers, including 5 Nobel Laureates, from across disciplines consider our future as part of the full-day "Science and Society" conference that honored the career of Zewail, whom Rosenbaum called "a wizard of scientific innovation."

Read the full story and view the slideshow

Written by Alex Roth

Home Page Title: 
Quintessentially Caltech
Exclude from News Hub: 
Yes
News Type: 
In Our Community
Exclude from Home Page: 
Home Page Summary: 
More than 1,000 people gathered to hear exceptional researchers consider our future at a conference honoring Ahmed Zewail.

Pages