Supporting Academic Writers at Caltech

Caltech scholars and students are developing their skills as scientists every day—but they also are honing their skills as academic writers. To this end, the Hixon Writing Center provides collaborative and interactive one-to-one tutoring sessions for students who wish to improve their writing, as well as consultation and feedback for faculty interested in developing their use of student writing in the classroom. It also conducts presentations and workshops, and holds events related to academic writing. Led by Susanne Hall, the Campus Writing Coordinator, the Center employs both undergraduate peer tutors and professional writing specialists.

In 2015, the Center received support from the Moore-Hufstedler Fund to create a series of videos that aim to introduce incoming freshmen to college writing. In addition to practical advice about techniques and the writing process, the videos also feature brief interviews with faculty and students about their experiences with academic writing.

"Scientists and engineers know that writing and communication are fundamental to their work and that there are many varied occasions for writing in their fields," Hall says. "These videos introduce our incoming students to this reality and then offer them concrete instructional support as they transition to college writing. The videos address the challenges we know many students face, so putting this information online is one more way we hope to support Caltech students' continued growth as writers during their time here."

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Toward a Smarter Grid

Steven Low, professor of computer science and electrical engineering at Caltech, says we are on the cusp of a historic transformation—a restructuring of the energy system similar to the reimagining and revamping that the communication and computer networks experienced over the last two decades, making them layered, with distributed and interconnected intelligence everywhere.

The power network of the future—aka the smart grid—will have to be much more dynamic and responsive than the current electric grid, handling tremendous loads while incorporating intermittent energy production from renewable resources such as wind and solar, all while ensuring that when you or I flip a switch at home or work, the power still comes on without fail.

The smart grid will also be much more distributed than the current network, which controls a relatively small number of generators to provide power to millions of passive endpoints—the computers, machines, buildings, and more that simply consume energy. In the future, thanks to inexpensive sensors and computers, many of those endpoints will become active and intelligent loads like smart devices, or distributed generators such as solar panels and wind turbines. These endpoints will be able to generate, sense, communicate, compute, and respond.

Given these trends, Low says, it is only reasonable to conclude that in the coming decades, the electrical system is likely to become "the largest and most complex cyberphysical system ever seen." And that presents both a risk and an opportunity. On the one hand, if the larger, more active system is not controlled correctly, blackouts could be much more frequent. On the other hand, if properly managed, it could greatly improve efficiency, security, robustness, and sustainability.

At Caltech, Low and an interdisciplinary group of engineers, economists, mathematicians, and computer scientists pulled together by the Resnick Sustainability Institute, along with partners like Southern California Edison and the Department of Energy, are working to develop the devices, systems, theories, and algorithms to help guide this historic transformation and make sure that it is properly managed.

In 2012, the Resnick Sustainability Institute issued a report titled Grid 2020: Towards a Policy of Renewable and Distributed Energy Resources, which focused on some of the major engineering, economic, and policy issues of the smart grid. That report led to a discussion series and working sessions that in turn led to the publication in 2014 of another report called More Than Smart: A Framework to Make the Distribution Grid More Open, Efficient and Resilient.

"One thing that makes the smart grid problem particularly appealing for us is that you can't solve it just as an engineer, just as a computer scientist, just as a control theorist, or just as an economist," says Adam Wierman, professor of computer science and Executive Officer for the Computing and Mathematical Sciences Department. "You actually have to bring to bear tools from all of these areas to solve the problem."

For example, he says, consider the problem of determining how much power various parts of the grid should generate at a particular time. This requires generating an amount of power that matches or closely approximates the amount of electricity demanded by customers. Currently this involves predicting electricity demand a day in advance, updating that prediction several hours before it is needed, and then figuring out how much nuclear power, natural gas, or coal will be produced to meet the demand. That determination is made through markets. In California, the California Independent System Operator runs a day-ahead electricity market in which utility companies and power plants buy and sell power generation for the following day. Then any small errors in the prediction are fixed at the last minute by engineers in a control office, with markets completely out of the picture.

"So you have a balance between the robustness and certainty provided by engineered control and the efficiency provided by markets and economic control," says Wierman. "But when renewable energy comes onto the table, all of a sudden the predictions of energy production are much less accurate, so the interaction between the markets and the engineering is up in the air, and no one knows how to handle this well." This, he says, is the type of problem the Caltech team, with its interdisciplinary approach, is uniquely equipped to address.

Indeed, the Caltech smart grid team is working on projects on the engineering side, projects on the markets side, and projects at the interface.

On the engineering side, a major project has revolved around a complex mathematical problem called optimal power flow that underlies many questions dealing with power system operations and planning. "Optimal power flow can tell you when things should be on or conserving energy, how to stabilize the voltage in the network as solar or wind generation fluctuates, or how to set your thermostat so that you maintain comfort in your building while stabilizing the voltage on the grid," explains Mani Chandy, the Simon Ramo Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus. "The problem has been around for 50 years but is extremely difficult to solve."

Chandy worked with Low; John Doyle, the Jean-Lou Chameau Professor of Control and Dynamical Systems, Electrical Engineering, and Bioengineering; and a number of Caltech students to devise a clever way to solve the problem, allowing them, for the first time, to compute a solution and then check whether that solution is globally optimal.

"We said, let's relax the constraints and optimize the cost over a bigger set that we can design to be solvable," explains Low. For example, if a customer is consuming electricity at a single location, the problem might ask how much electricity that individual is actually consuming; a relaxation would say that that person is consuming no more than a certain amount—it is a way of adding flexibility to a problem with tight constraints. "Almost magically, it turns out that if I design my physical set in a clever way, the solution for this larger simple set turns out to be the same as it would be for the original set."

The new approach produces a feasible solution for almost all distribution systems—the low-voltage networks that take power from larger substations and ultimately deliver it to the houses, buildings, street lights, and so on in a region. "That's important because many of the innovations in the energy sector in the coming decade will happen on distribution systems," says Low.

Another Caltech project attempts to predict how many home and business owners are likely to adopt rooftop solar panels over the next 5, 10, 20, or 30 years. In Southern California, the number of solar installations has increased steadily for several years. For planning purposes, utility companies need to anticipate whether that growth will continue and at what pace. For example, Low says, if the network is eventually going to comprise 15 or 20 percent renewables, then the current grid is robust enough. "But if we are going to have 50 or 80 percent renewables," he says, "then the grid will need huge changes in terms of both engineering and market design."

Working with Chandy, graduate students Desmond Cai and Anish Agarwal (BS '13, MS '15) developed a new model for predicting how many homes and businesses will install rooftop solar panels. The model has proven highly accurate. Researchers believe that whether or not people "go solar" depends largely on two factors: how much money they will save and their confidence in the new technology. The Caltech model, completed in 2012, indicates that the amount of money that people can save by installing rooftop solar has a huge influence on whether they will adopt the technology. Based on their research, the team has also developed a web-based tool that predicts how many people will install solar panels using a utility company's data. Southern California Edison's planning department is actively using the tool.

On the markets side, Caltech researchers are doing theoretical work looking at the smart grid and the network of markets it will produce. Electricity markets can be both complicated and interesting to study because unlike a traditional market—a single place where people go to buy and sell something—the electricity "market" actually consists of many networked marketplaces interacting in complicated ways.

One potential problem with this system and the introduction of more renewables, Wierman says, is that it opens the door for firms to manipulate prices by turning off generators. Whereas the operational status of a normal generator can be monitored, with solar and wind power, it is nearly impossible to verify how much power should have been produced because it is difficult to know whether it was windy or sunny at a certain time. "For example, you can significantly impact prices by pushing—or not pushing—solar energy from your solar farm," Wierman says. "There are huge opportunities for strongly manipulating market structure and prices in these environments. We are beginning to look at how to redesign markets so that this isn't as powerful or as dangerous."

An area of smart grid research where the Caltech team takes full advantage of its multidisciplinary nature is at the interface of engineering and markets. One example is a concept known as demand response, in which a mismatch between energy supply and demand can be addressed from the demand side (that is, by involving consumers), rather than from the power-generation side.

As an example of demand response, some utilities have started programs where participants, who have smart thermostats installed in their homes in exchange for some monetary reward, allow the company to turn off their air conditioners for a short period of time when it is necessary to reduce the demand on the grid. In that way, household air conditioners become "shock absorbers" for the system.

"But the economist says wait a minute, that's really inefficient. You might be turning the AC off for people who desperately want it on and leaving it on for people who couldn't care less," says John Ledyard, the Allen and Lenabelle Davis Professor of Economics and Social Sciences. A counter proposal is called Prices to Devices, where the utility sends price signals to devices, like thermostats, in homes and offices, and customers decide if they want to pay for power at those prices. Ledyard says while that is efficient rationing in equilibrium, it introduces a delay between the consumer and the utility, creating an instability in the dynamics of the system.

The Caltech team has devised an intermediate proposal that removes the delay in the system. Rather than sending a price and having consumers react to it, their program has consumers enter their sensitivity to various prices ahead of time, right on their smart devices. This can be done with a single number. Then those devices deliver that information to the algorithm that operates the network. For example, a consumer might program his or her smart thermostat, to effectively say, "If a kilowatt of power costs $1 and the temperature outside is 90 degrees, I want you to keep the air conditioner on; if the price is $5 and the temperature outside is 80 degrees, go ahead and turn it off."

"The consumer's response is handled by the algorithm, so there's no lag," says Ledyard.

Currently, the Caltech smart grid team is working closely with Southern California Edison to set up a pilot test in Orange County involving several thousand households. The homes will be equipped with various distributed energy resources including rooftop solar panels, electric vehicles, smart thermostats for air conditioners, and pool pumps. The team's new approach to the optimal power flow problem and demand response will be tested to see whether it can keep stable a miniature version of the future smart grid.

Such experiments are crucial for preparing for the major changes to the electrical system that are certainly coming down the road, Low says. "The stakes are high. In the face of this historic transformation, we need to do all that we can to minimize the risk and make sure that we realize the full potential."

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Toward a Smarter Grid
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Friday, November 13, 2015 to Saturday, November 14, 2015

New Directions in Applied Microeconomics: Theory and Evidence

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The Caltech–Huntington Library Materialities, Texts and Images Collaboration Opens Its Final Chapter

Two scholars are nearing the end of a yearlong journey into history, utilizing the humanities expertise of Caltech and the archival holdings of the Huntington Library, just a mile distant. Now in its third year, the Materialities, Texts and Images (MTI) program is part of a long-standing collaboration between the two institutions. Started by John Brewer, the Eli and Edye Broad Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences, in collaboration with Steve Hindle, the W. M. Keck Foundation Director of Research at the Huntington, MTI has allowed the two visiting scholars, Julie Park, an associate professor for research at Vassar College, and Susan Barbour, a lecturer at Somerville College, University of Oxford, to examine the Huntington's collections in support of their research. The holdings include art, literature, and personal and business correspondence from Western European and American society, dating from the Middle Ages through the 20th century.

"John Brewer established the MTI program based on his belief that the humanities should be more than the sum of the parts," says Jean-Laurent Rosenthal, the Rea A. and Lela G. Axline Professor of Business Economics and chair of the Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences. "At Caltech, there has always been the idea that we can bring a bunch of people together to solve interesting problems in science, engineering, and social science. So John thought, why not do the same in the humanities? The MTI program really showed that this can be very productive."

Hindle shares leadership of the collaboration. "MTI was designed to bring an institutional structure to a series of relationships between the Huntington and Caltech that had in the past been relatively informal and interpersonal," he says. "Each year we have appointed two postdoctoral researchers, and they split the time in the program between the two institutions. It's been immensely successful."

At the core of the MTI program is the study of things—actual objects—within the context of Western European history. These can include books, paintings, manuscripts, and even calling cards (the Huntington has one of the largest collections of 18th- and 19th-century calling cards in the world). Anything that represents a material form of communication or authorship can be studied. What messages did these items convey and how did they do so? What do the objects show us about their authors or creators? How have the processes involved in their creation altered this message, and what does that communicate to the end-user? These are some of the research areas that exist within the MTI program.

"Things and materiality have really become a very hot topic in the humanities and social sciences," says Park. "I think it's really beautiful the way the two areas have come together. It's a truly interdisciplinary area."

Park's MTI project examined the physical and material environment of mental life in 18th-century England, and the relationship between those environments and the rise of the novel. The 18th-century English novel re-created how people saw the world around them, in particular the insides of homes and public spaces. "I'm looking at both the literary genre of the novel and the material environment that works with what was then a new construction of physical space that the novel represented," she explains.

Barbour has also focused on materiality, largely through the writings of Susan Howe, a 20th-century painter, writer, and poet. Howe's wide range of artistic expression, which includes poetry, criticism, and music, lends itself to interpretation via materiality, Barbour notes. "Howe investigates disparities between handwritten documents and printed text," she says. "She looks at the blots, drawings, and other material signifiers that are not included in mechanical reproduction and that only exist in the original document. These become emblematic of the way individual lives and stories are lost to historical narratives driven by utility and relevance." In other words, commercial reproductions and other mass-produced examples of an artist's work cannot convey the full range of the artist's expression—due, as least in part, to the material differences between the originals and the representations.

The working relationship between Caltech and the Huntington has specific advantages, Barbour says. "The experience of being one of a smaller group of nonscientific 'others' at a scientific institute has distinct benefits," she says. "Because the humanities and social sciences department is at once smaller and broader, one hones the ability to appreciate overlapping methodologies of research projects that at first glance may bear little in common with one another."

Two new researchers began their MTI fellowships last month. Cora Gilroy-Ware, who has curated exhibitions at the London Tate Gallery and the Huntington Art Gallery, will be exploring the material and chemical properties of classical painting and sculpture in 18th- and 19th-century Britain, investigating how the artist's technical processes were shaped by economic and socio-political developments. Alexandre Dubé, an assistant professor of art history at Washington University in St. Louis, will research how the buying and selling of goods in French Louisiana during the colonial period affected the politics of the time.

The new fellowship appointments represent the final chapter of the MTI program, but not of Caltech's partnership with the Huntington. A continuing collaboration within the humanities is now under development and will be inaugurated when MTI concludes in June, 2016. 

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The Caltech-Huntington Materialities, Texts and Images collaboration is about to open its final chapter.
Wednesday, November 11, 2015
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Alumnus Arthur McDonald Wins 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics

Arthur B. McDonald (PhD '70), director of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) in Ontario, Canada, and Takaaki Kajita, at the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Japan, have shared the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery that neutrinos can change their identities as they travel through space.

McDonald and Kajita lead two large research teams whose work has upended the standard model of particle physics and settled a debate that has raged since 1930, when the neutrino's existence was first proposed by physicist Wolfgang Pauli. Pauli initially devised the neutrino as a bookkeeping device—one to carry away surplus energy from nuclear reactions in stars and from radioactive decay processes on Earth. In order to make the math work, he gave it no charge, almost no mass, and only the weakest of interactions with ordinary matter. Billions of them are coursing through our bodies every second, and we are entirely unaware of them.

There are three types of neutrinos—electron, muon, and tau—and they were, for many years, assumed to be massless and immutable. The technology to detect electron neutrinos emerged in the 1950s, and it slowly became apparent that as few as one-third of the neutrinos the theorists said the sun should be emitting were actually being observed. Various theories were proposed to explain the deficit, including the possibility that the detectable electron neutrinos were somehow transmuting into their undetectable kin en route to Earth.

Solving the mystery of the missing neutrinos would require extremely large detectors in order to catch enough of the elusive particles to get accurate statistics. Such sensitive detectors also require enormous amounts of shielding to avoid false readings.

The University of Tokyo's Super-Kamiokande neutrino detector, which came online in 1996, was built 1,000 meters underground in a zinc mine. Its detector, which counts muon neutrinos and records their direction of travel, found fewer cosmic-ray neutrinos coming up through the Earth than from any other direction. Since they should not be affected in any way by traveling through the 12,742-kilometer diameter of our planet, Kajita and his colleagues concluded that the extra distance had given them a little extra time to change their identities.

McDonald's SNO, built 2,100 meters deep in a nickel mine, began taking data in 1999. It has two counting systems. One is exclusively sensitive to electron neutrinos, which are the type emitted by the sun; the other records all neutrinos but does not identify their types. The SNO also recorded only about one-third of the predicted number of solar electron-type neutrinos—but the aggregate of all three types measured by the other counting systems matched the theory.

The conclusion, for which McDonald and Kajita were awarded the Nobel Prize, was that neutrinos must have a nonzero mass. Quantum mechanics treats particles as waves, and the potentially differing masses associated with muons and taus gives them different wavelengths. The probability waves of the three particle types are aligned when the particle is formed, but as they propagate they get out of synch. Therefore, there is a one-third chance of seeing any particular neutrino in its electron form. Because these particles have this nonzero mass, their gravitational effects on the large-scale behavior of the universe must be taken into account—a profound implication for cosmology.

McDonald came to Caltech in 1965 to pursue a PhD in physics in the Kellogg Radiation Laboratory under the mentorship of the late Charles A. Barnes, professor of physics, emeritus, who passed away in August 2015. "Charlie Barnes was a great mentor who was very proud of his students," says Bradley W. Filippone, professor of physics and a postdoctoral researcher under Barnes. "It is a shame that Charlie didn't get to see Art receive this tremendous honor."

A native of Sydney, Canada, McDonald received his bachelor of science and master's degrees, both in physics, from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 1964 and 1965, respectively. After receiving his doctorate, he worked for the Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario until 1982, when he became a professor of physics at Princeton University. He left Princeton in 1989 and became a professor at Queen's University in Kingston, Canada; the same year, he became the director of the SNO. In 2006, he became the holder of the Gordon and Patricia Gray Chair in Particle Astrophysics, a position he held until his retirement in 2013.

Among many other awards and honors, McDonald is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Royal Society of Canada, and of Great Britain's Royal Society. He is the recipient of the Killam Prize in the Natural Sciences; the Henry Marshall Tory Medal from the Royal Society of Canada, its highest award for scientific achievement; and the European Physics Society HEP Division Giuseppe and Vanna Cocconi Prize for Particle Astrophysics.

To date, 34 Caltech alumni and faculty have won a total of 35 Nobel Prizes. Last year, alumnus Eric Betzig (BS '83) received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

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Alumnus Arthur McDonald Wins 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics
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Summer Interns Return with a World of Experiences

Caltech undergraduate students returned to campus this week, many after spending the summer working at companies in biotechnology, technology, and finance, among other fields. These students have had the opportunity to learn firsthand about the career opportunities and paths that may be available to them after graduation. They also had the chance to put Caltech's rigorous academic and problem-solving training to the test.

In the summer of 2015, nearly a third of returning sophomores, juniors, and seniors were placed in an internship position through Caltech's Summer Undergraduate Internship Program (SUIP). The program, run through the Institute's Career Development Center (CDC), helps connect current undergraduate students with a wide range of companies and businesses that can provide practical skills and work experiences that give the students an edge in the future job market.

Many undergraduates find paid summer internships through the CDC, says Lauren Stolper, the director of fellowships, advising, study abroad, and the CDC. The center organizes fall and winter career fairs and offers workshops related to finding internships; provides individual advising on internship options and conducting a job hunt for an internship; organizes interviews for students through its on-campus recruiting program; and provides web-based internship listings and company information through Techerlink, its online job-posting system.

Through the formal establishment of SUIP two years ago—thanks, in part, to the initiative of Craig SanPietro (BS '68, engineering; MS '69, mechanical engineering) and with seed money provided by him and three of his alumni friends and former Dabney House roommates, Peter Cross (BS '68, engineering), Eric Garen (BS '68, engineering), and Charles Zeller (BS '68, engineering)—the CDC has been able to dedicate even more time and attention to helping undergraduates secure these important positions, Stolper says.

"Through internships, students have the opportunity to learn more about the practical applications of their knowledge by contributing to ongoing projects under the guidance of professionals," says Aneesha Akram, a career counselor for internship development/advising, who oversees SUIP.

"Completing summer internships help undergraduates become competitive candidates for full-time positions," says Akram. "When it comes to recruiting for full-time positions, companies seek out candidates with previous internship experience. We have found that many large companies extend return offers and full-time conversions to students who previously interned with them."

The infographic at the above right provides a snapshot of Caltech undergraduate internships over this past summer. Students seeking internships for next summer can contact Akram or look at the CDC website for more information.

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Thursday, February 4, 2016
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