New Gut Bacterium Discovered in Termite's Digestion of Wood

When termites munch on wood, the small bits are delivered to feed a community of unique microbes living in their guts, and in a complex process involving multiple steps, these microbes turn the hard, fibrous material into a nutritious meal for the termite host. One key step uses hydrogen to convert carbon dioxide into organic carbon—a process called acetogenesis—but little is known about which gut bacteria play specific roles in the process.

Bruce Murray

Bruce Churchill Murray, Caltech Professor of Planetary Science, Emeritus, and former head of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), succumbed to complications of Alzheimer's disease on August 29, 2013. He was 81.
Friday, October 4, 2013

Undergraduate Teaching Assistant Orientation

Monday, August 12, 2013
Cahill, Hameetman Auditorium

Magnetic Fields: A Window to a Planet's Interior and Habitability

Seeing Snow in Space

An international team of researchers, including Caltech's Geoffrey Blake, has used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to capture the first image of a snow line around a Sun-like star. The findings appear in the current issue of Science Express.

Evidence for a Martian Ocean

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have discovered evidence for an ancient delta on Mars where a river might once have emptied into a vast ocean. This ocean, if it existed, could have covered much of Mars's northern hemisphere—stretching over as much as a third of the planet.
Thursday, September 26, 2013
Ramo Auditorium

Graduate TA Orientation & Teaching Conference

A Stepping-Stone for Oxygen on Earth

For most terrestrial life on Earth, oxygen is necessary for survival. But the planet's atmosphere did not always contain this life-sustaining substance, and one of science's greatest mysteries is how and when oxygenic photosynthesis—the process responsible for producing oxygen on Earth through the splitting of water molecules—first began. Now, a team led by geobiologists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has found evidence of a precursor photosystem involving manganese that predates cyanobacteria, the first group of organisms to release oxygen into the environment via photosynthesis.

Bethany Ehlmann Selected as National Geographic Emerging Explorer

National Geographic Society has named Bethany Ehlmann, assistant professor of planetary science at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), a 2013 Emerging Explorer. Ehlmann joins 16 other young scientists, educators, artists, and entrepreneurs recognized by National Geographic for making an impact on the world while still in the early stages of their careers.

Ehlmann accepted her award at the Emerging Explorers Symposium in Washington, D.C., on June 12. The symposium was part of the society's 125th anniversary celebration running June 10-14.

Brown, Farley, and Seinfeld Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Based on their distinguished achievements in original research, three Caltech professors—Mike Brown, Ken Farley, and John Seinfeld—are among the newly elected members and foreign associates.

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