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Center for Student Services 360 (Workshop Space)

Experiences from two years of MOOCs at Caltech: A WEST Public Seminar

Spring Break in the Galápagos

Teaser Title Text: 
Spring Break in the Galápagos
Slideshow: 
Credit: Kevin Yu

As the culminating event of the new Evolution course at Caltech, a dozen Techers, their TA, and two professors—Rob Phillips and Victoria Orphan—spent a week of spring break living as field researchers on the Galápagos Islands.

Credit: Kevin Yu

Ecuadorian naturalist Ernesto Vaca led the group in their studies of the natural world on the Galápagos. Here, at Playa Las Bachas on Santa Cruz Island, he is describing the molting of the Sally Lightfoot crab. The students kept scientific journals during the trip, writing down questions and observations along the way.

Credit: Laura Santoso

Marine iguanas are endemic to the Galápagos and are the only modern lizards that swim. They offer an excellent example of the way isolation on islands can lead to unique speciation.

Credit: Jeff Marlow

The group's home base for the trip was the research vessel Daphne, shown here anchored in James Bay.

Credit: Jeff Marlow

The group walks over solidified volcanic ash on Santiago Island.

Credit: Victoria Orphan

Flightlessness is one of the key evolutionary adaptations seen on islands. Here, a flightless cormorant is seen diving to gather food.

Credit: Kevin Yu

The landscape of Cerro Dragón (Dragon Hill) on Santa Cruz Island. This was one of many sites where the students were able to see the impact of invasive species such as goats.

Credit: Laura Santoso

The group's mascot—a Darwin bobblehead doll—posing in front of the third largest oceanic caldera in the world at the Sierra Negra volcano.

Credit: Pushpa Neppala

The Sierra Negra volcano on Santa Cruz Island.

Credit: Jeff Marlow

A young sea lion serves as an unexpected roadblock upon the group's arrival at North Seymour Island.

Credit: Ketaki Panse

A blue-footed booby perched atop a volcanic rock on North Seymour Island.

Credit: Laura Santoso

A land iguana with the island Daphne Minor in the background. One of the central questions about the iguanas on the Galápagos is how they arrived on the islands in the first place.

Credit: Aleena Patel

Part of the group explores a mangrove lagoon in Elizabeth Bay on Isla Isabela. According to Orphan, the mangroves are a nursery for many animals, and she encouraged the students to examine the mangrove roots closely. "Really looking closely, you start to see little transparent shrimp running up and down. There's a lot of richness that you can see even by just sitting and observing," she says.

Credit: Ketaki Panse

A beautiful sunset seen from the top of Bartholomew Island.

Body: 

As the final element of Evolution, Caltech's new Bi/Ge 105 course, a dozen students spent their spring break snorkeling with penguins and sharks, hiking a volcano, and otherwise taking in the natural laboratory for evolution that is the Galápagos Islands. The second-term course was created and is taught by Rob Phillips, the Fred and Nancy Morris Professor of Biophysics and Biology, and Victoria Orphan, professor of geobiology, and is designed to give students both a broad picture of evolution and a chance to make their own up-close-and-personal observations.

 

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