Life rebounded quickly after collision 65 million years ago that wiped out dinosaurs

Though the dinosaurs fared poorly in the comet or meteor impact that destroyed two-thirds of all living species 65 million years ago, new evidence shows that various other forms of life rebounded from the catastrophe in a remarkably short period of time.

Stevenson Receives Feynman Prize for Excellence in Teaching

PASADENA, Ca.— "One hopes that students are being taught to think and not just grind through lots of homework," says Caltech's David Stevenson about the importance of teaching. In recognition of his passion for undergraduate education, Stevenson has been awarded this year's Richard P. Feynman Prize for Excellence in Teaching.

New planets still being createdIn our stellar neighborhood, study shows

In a study that strengthens the likelihood that solar systems like our own are still being formed, an international team of scientists is reporting today that three young stars in the sun's neighborhood have the raw materials necessary for the formation of Jupiter-sized planets.

New results on Martian meteorite support hypothesisthat life can jump between planets

According to one version of the "panspermia" theory, life on Earth could originally have arrived here by way of meteorites from Mars, where conditions early in the history of the solar system are thought to have been more favorable for the creation of life from nonliving ingredients.

Astronomers improve "cosmic yardstick" by measuringdistance to star in Gemini with Palomar Testbed Interferometer

Researchers using the testbed interferometer at Palomar Observatory have achieved the best-ever distance measurement to a type of star known as a Cepheid variable. The new results improve the "cosmic yardstick" used to infer the size and age of the universe.

Packard Foundation Gives Caltech $1 Million

Caltech receives a $1 million grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation Science Program.

East and West Antarctica once began separating but then stopped, new research shows

PASADENA—Earth was well on its way to having two Antarcticas long ago, but a tectonic separation between the eastern and western portions of the continent suddenly stopped after 17 million years of spreading, researchers say.

Astrobiologists should look for both water and energy sources when searching for life on other worlds, researcher says

PASADENA—When planetary scientists first saw evidence of a water ocean beneath the frozen surface of Europa, everyone immediately began pondering the likelihood that the Jovian moon could harbor advanced life forms—perhaps even fishlike creatures.

But last summer a group of planetary scientists from the California Institute of Technology and Jet Propulsion Laboratory threw water on the theory—so to speak—when they took a novel approach and concluded that advanced life forms were not likely.

Snowball Earth episode 2.4 billion years ago was hard on life, but good for modern industrial economy, research shows

For the primitive organisms unlucky enough to be around 2.4 billion years ago, the first global freeze was a real wipeout, likely the worst in the history of life on Earth. Few of the organisms escaped extinction, and those that did were forced into an evolutionary bottleneck that altered the diversity of life for eons.

Thunderstorms found to be an energy source for Jupiter's Great Red Spot

PASADENA-Using data from the Galileo spacecraft currently in orbit around Jupiter, scientists have discovered that thunderstorms beneath the upper cloud cover are supplying energy to the planet's colorful large-scale weather patterns-including the 300-year-old Great Red Spot.

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