Caltech planetary scientist has "modest proposal" for sending probe to Earth's core

PASADENA, Calif. - Dave Stevenson has spent his career working on "swing-by" missions to the other planets. Now he has a modest proposal he'd like to swing by some government agency with a few billion dollars in available funding.

According to Stevenson's calculations, it should be possible to send a probe all the way to Earth's core by combining several proven technologies with a few well-grounded scientific assumptions about the workings of the planet.

Three Caltech Faculty Named to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

PASADENA, Calif. — The American Academy of Arts and Sciences has elected three California Institute of Technology faculty members as academy fellows. They are Fred C. Anson, Elizabeth Gilloon Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus; Joseph L. Kirschvink, professor of geobiology; and Colin F. Camerer, Rea A. and Lela G. Axline Professor of Business Economics.

The 2003 class of 187 fellows and 29 foreign honorary members includes four college presidents, three Nobel laureates, and four Pulitzer Prize winners.

Six Caltech Professors Awarded Sloan Research Fellowships

Six Caltech professors recently received Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowships for 2003.

Antarctic landmarks named afterCaltech experts on glacier ice flow

Barclay Kamb and Hermann Engelhardt, longtime researchers on the workings of the Antarctic ice streams, have been honored by the American Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (ACAN) with the renaming of two features near the gigantic Ross Ice Shelf, a Texas-sized mass of floating ice.

The Martian polar caps are almost entirelywater ice, Caltech research shows

Reporting in the February 14 issue of the journal Science, Caltech planetary science professor Andy Ingersoll and his graduate student, Shane Byrne, present evidence that the decades-old model of the polar caps being made of dry ice is in error.

Clouds discovered on Saturn's moon Titan

Teams of astronomers at the California Institute of Technology and at the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered methane clouds near the south pole of Titan, resolving a fierce debate about whether clouds exist amid the haze of the moon's atmosphere.

The new observations were made using the W. M. Keck II 10-meter and the Gemini North 8-meter telescopes atop Hawaii's Mauna Kea volcano in December 2001. Both telescopes are outfitted with adaptive optics that provide unprecedented detail of features not seen even by the Voyager spacecraft during its flyby of Saturn and Titan.

New Theory Accounts for Existence of Binaries in Kuiper Belt

In the last few years, researchers have discovered more than 500 objects in the Kuiper belt, a gigantic outer ring in the outskirts of the solar system, beyond the orbit of Neptune. Of these, seven so far have turned out to be binaries--two objects that orbit each other. The surprise is that these binaries all seem to be pairs of widely separated objects of similar size. This is surprising because more familiar pairings, such as the Earth/moon system, tend to be unequal in size and/or rather close together.

Caltech Professor to Explore Abrupt Climate Changes

By analyzing stalagmites from caves in Sarawak, which is the Malaysian section of Borneo and the location of one of the world's oldest rain forests, and by studying deep-sea corals from the North Atlantic Ocean, California Institute of Technology researcher Jess Adkins will explore the vital link between the deep ocean, the atmosphere, and abrupt changes in global climates.

New study describes workings of deep oceanduring the Last Glacial Maximum

Scientists know quite a bit about surface conditions during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), a period that peaked about 18,000 years ago, when ice covered significant portions of Canada and northern Europe.

But to really understand the mechanisms involved in climate change, scientists need to have detailed knowledge of the interaction between the ocean and the atmosphere. And until now, a key component of that knowledge has been lacking for the LGM because of limited understanding of the glacial deep ocean.

Rupture of Denali fault responsible for 7.9-magAlaskan earthquake of November 3

Geologists just back from a reconnaissance of the 7.9-magnitude Alaska earthquake of November 3 confirm that rupture of the Denali fault was the principal cause of the quake.

According to Caltech geology professor Kerry Sieh, Central Washington University geological sciences professor Charles Rubin, and Peter Haeussler of the U.S. Geological Survey, investigations over a week-long period revealed three large ruptures with a total length of about 320 kilometers.

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