Caltech geophysicists gain new insights on Earth's core–mantle boundary

Earth's core–mantle boundary is a place none of us will ever go, but researchers using a special high-velocity cannon have produced results showing there may be molten rock at this interface at about 1,800 miles. Further, this molten rock may have rested peacefully at the core-mantle boundary for eons.

Atmospheric scientists still acquire samples the old-fashioned way--by flying up and getting them

Just as Ishmael always returned to the high seas for whales after spending time on land, an atmospheric researcher always returns to the air for new data.

Old Caltech Telescope Yields New Science

Mike Brown uses Robinson scope to find weather on Titan.

Atmospheric researchers present new findingson the natural hydrogen cycle

Two months after a pivotal study on the potential impact of a future hydrogen economy on the environment, further evidence is emerging on what would happen to new quantities of hydrogen released into the atmosphere through human activity.

Gravity Variations Predict Earthquake Behavior

PASADENA, Calif. — In trying to predict where earthquakes will occur, few people would think to look at Earth's gravity field.

Hydrogen economy might impactEarth's stratosphere, study shows

According to conventional wisdom, hydrogen-fueled cars are environmentally friendly because they emit only water vapor -- a naturally abundant atmospheric gas. But leakage of the hydrogen gas that can fuel such cars could cause problems for the upper atmosphere, new research shows.

In an article appearing this week in the journal Science, researchers from the California Institute of Technology report that the leaked hydrogen gas that would inevitably result from a hydrogen economy, if it accumulates, could indirectly cause as much as a 10-percent decrease in atmospheric ozone.

Caltech planetary scientist has "modest proposal" for sending probe to Earth's core

PASADENA, Calif. - Dave Stevenson has spent his career working on "swing-by" missions to the other planets. Now he has a modest proposal he'd like to swing by some government agency with a few billion dollars in available funding.

According to Stevenson's calculations, it should be possible to send a probe all the way to Earth's core by combining several proven technologies with a few well-grounded scientific assumptions about the workings of the planet.

Three Caltech Faculty Named to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

PASADENA, Calif. — The American Academy of Arts and Sciences has elected three California Institute of Technology faculty members as academy fellows. They are Fred C. Anson, Elizabeth Gilloon Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus; Joseph L. Kirschvink, professor of geobiology; and Colin F. Camerer, Rea A. and Lela G. Axline Professor of Business Economics.

The 2003 class of 187 fellows and 29 foreign honorary members includes four college presidents, three Nobel laureates, and four Pulitzer Prize winners.

Six Caltech Professors Awarded Sloan Research Fellowships

Six Caltech professors recently received Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowships for 2003.

Antarctic landmarks named afterCaltech experts on glacier ice flow

Barclay Kamb and Hermann Engelhardt, longtime researchers on the workings of the Antarctic ice streams, have been honored by the American Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (ACAN) with the renaming of two features near the gigantic Ross Ice Shelf, a Texas-sized mass of floating ice.

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