11/27/2012 16:29:47
Ann Motrunich
The confirmed count of planets in other solar systems has skyrocketed to more than 850, plus thousands of identified candidates. The opportunity to characterize so many solar systems has brought together Caltech planetary scientists and astronomers, who are forming a Center for Planetary Astronomy.
Tuesday, April 9, 2013
Avery Library – Avery House

Spring Teaching Assistant Orientation

11/06/2012 19:33:25
Shayna Chabner McKinney
As one of five Caltech graduate students currently staffing the Mars Science Laboratory mission, Katie Stack is simultaneously exploring the geologic pasts of both Mars and Earth.
10/16/2012 09:03:06
Douglas Smith
Fifteen years after its launch, the Cassini mission to Saturn continues to give us a close-up, long-term view of the ringed planet and its astonishingly diverse collection of moons. Here are some of the highlights so far.
10/14/2012 19:21:52
Shayna Chabner McKinney
Andrew Ingersoll's research has included studies of the so-called runaway greenhouse effect that is thought to have boiled away Venus's oceans, the presence of liquid water on Mars, and the atmospheric dynamics of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.
10/03/2012 13:00:50
Kathy Svitil
The California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has been rated the world's number one university in the 2012–2013 Times Higher Education global ranking of the top 200 universities.
09/27/2012 13:12:18
Kimm Fesenmaier
An ankle- or hip-deep stream once flowed with force across the surface of Mars in the very spot where the Curiosity rover is currently exploring. The finding provides new information about a once wet environment in Gale Crater.
09/25/2012 12:12:42
Katie Neith
Two members of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) faculty have been given National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director's Awards. The awards are administered through the NIH's Common Fund, which provides support for research deemed to be both innovative and risky.
09/12/2012 07:00:00
Kimm Fesenmaier

Several hypotheses have been proposed to explan how clay minerals detected on the surface of Mars were formed. Now, publishing in the journal Nature Geoscience, a team of French and American scientists including Caltech's Bethany Ehlmann, has suggested a new possibility. The Los Angeles Times recently spoke to Ehlmann about the paper and its implications.

08/14/2012 07:00:00
Marcus Woo

Sometimes risking life and limb, Caltech field geologists travel to some of the most remote corners of the globe—all in the name of science

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