Tuesday, April 9, 2013
Avery Library

Spring Teaching Assistant Orientation

Julia Greer Receives NASA Research Grant and Early Career Awards

Julia Greer is going to need to find space in her office for all of the awards, medals, and grant acceptance letters she has been receiving lately.

While celebrating her recent Breakthrough Award from Popular Mechanics magazine, Greer—a Caltech assistant professor of materials science and mechanics—received notice from NASA that she is among a select group of 10 recipients of the agency's inaugural Space Technology Research Opportunities Early Career Faculty grants.

Progress for Paraplegics

Caltech engineers, who last year helped enable a paraplegic man to stand and move his legs voluntarily, have developed a new method to automate the system, which provides epidural electrical stimulation to people with spinal-cord injuries. This advancement could make the technology widely available to rehab clinics and thousands of patients worldwide. It would also reduce the system's training time and costs for hospitals and clinics and make it easier for patients to continue their rehabilitation at home.

Reconsidering the Global Thermostat

Many ideas have been floated about how to potentially manipulate the planet's climate in order to counteract the effects of global warming—a concept known as geoengineering. But because some of these efforts could affect areas of the planet inequitably, geoengineering has often raised an ethical question: Whose hand would control the global thermostat? Now a team of researchers from Caltech, Harvard, and the Carnegie Institution says there doesn't have to be just a single global control.

Engineering with Impact

Guruswami (Ravi) Ravichandran is an expert on breakups—of ceramics and metals, not relationships. The John E. Goode, Jr., Professor of Aerospace and professor of mechanical engineering and the director of the Graduate Aerospace Laboratories at Caltech, Ravichandran will talk about his work at the leading edge of impact mechanics on Wednesday, October 24, at 8:00 p.m. in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.

Developing the Next Generation of Microsensors

Setting the stage for a new class of motional sensors, Caltech researchers have developed a new ultrasensitive, microchip-scale accelerometer that uses laser light to measure displacement.

How I Spent My Summer Vacation

Last summer, Caltech junior Julie Jester worked on a project that might one day partially counteract blindness caused by a deteriorating retina. Her job: to help Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Azita Emami and her graduate students create the communications link between a tiny camera and a novel wireless neural stimulator that can be surgically inserted into the eye.

Now in its 34th year, Caltech's Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) program has paired nearly 7,000 students with real-world, hands-on projects in the labs of Caltech faculty and JPL staff.

A "Gifted" Professor

Gifted teacher. Inspired researcher. Knowledgeable adviser. Personal friend. These are a few of the ways in which professor emeritus Frank Marble's former students describe him. Not too surprisingly, these sentiments also capture some of the many reasons why 20 of Marble's former PhD and graduate student advisees have joined together to honor and thank their mentor by creating an endowed professorship in his and his wife's names.

Caltech Again Named World's Top University in <i>Times Higher Education</i> Global Ranking

PASADENA, Calif.—The California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has been rated the world's number one university in the 2012–2013 Times Higher Education global ranking of the top 200 universities.

Oxford University, Stanford University, Harvard University, and MIT round out the top five.

Caltech Faculty Members Honored by <i>Popular Mechanics</i>

Caltech engineers and scientists often work at the frontiers of science—pushing the limits of what is known and what is possible. Now, with its eighth annual Breakthrough Awards, Popular Mechanics magazine is recognizing two projects that fall into this category and in which Caltech faculty members have played major roles—the development of ultralight micro-lattices by materials scientist Julia Greer and colleagues, and the Voyager 1 and 2 missions, whose project scientist, physicist Ed Stone, has been at Caltech for the missions' entire 35-year ride.

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