Monday, May 5, 2014
Center for Student Services 360 (Workshop Space)

Experiences from two years of MOOCs at Caltech: A WEST Public Seminar

Friday, April 11, 2014
Center for Student Services 360 (Workshop Space)

Spring Ombudsperson Training

Quantum Photon Properties Revealed in Another Particle—the Plasmon

For years, researchers have been interested in developing quantum computers—the theoretical next generation of technology that will outperform conventional computers. Instead of holding data in bits, the digital units used by computers today, quantum computers store information in units called "qubits." One approach for computing with qubits relies on the creation of two single photons that interfere with one another in a device called a waveguide. Results from a recent applied science study at Caltech support the idea that waveguides coupled with another quantum particle—the surface plasmon—could also become an important piece of the quantum computing puzzle.

The work was published in the print version of the journal Nature Photonics the week of March 31.

As their name suggests, surface plasmons exist on a surface—in this case the surface of a metal, at the point where the metal meets the air. Metals are conductive materials, which means that electrons within the metal are free to move around. On the surface of the metal, these free electrons move together, in a collective motion, creating waves of electrons. Plasmons—the quantum particles of these coordinated waves—are akin to photons, the quantum particles of light (and all other forms of electromagnetic radiation).

"If you imagine the surface of a metal is like a sea of electrons, then surface plasmons are the ripples or waves on this sea," says graduate student Jim Fakonas, first author on the study.

These waves are especially interesting because they oscillate at optical frequencies. Therefore, if you shine a light at the metal surface, you can launch one of these plasmon waves, pushing the ripples of electrons across the surface of the metal. Because these plasmons directly couple with light, researchers have used them in photovoltaic cells and other applications for solar energy. In the future, they may also hold promise for applications in quantum computing.

However, the plasmon's odd behavior, which falls somewhere between that of an electron and that of a photon, makes it difficult to characterize. "According to quantum theory, it should be possible to analyze these plasmonic waves using quantum mechanics"—the physics that governs the behavior of matter and light at the atomic and subatomic scale—"in the same way that we can use it to study electromagnetic waves, like light," Fakonas says. However, in the past, researchers were lacking the experimental evidence to support this theory.

To find that evidence, Fakonas and his colleagues in the laboratory of Harry Atwater, Howard Hughes Professor of Applied Physics and Materials Science, looked at one particular phenomenon observed of photons—quantum interference—to see if plasmons also exhibit this effect.

The applied scientists borrowed their experimental technique from a classic test of quantum interference in which two single, identical photons are launched at one another through opposite sides of a 50/50 beam splitter, a device that acts as an imperfect mirror, reflecting half of the light that reaches its surface while allowing the the other half of the light to pass through. If quantum interference is observed, both identical photons must emerge together on the same side of the beam splitter, with their presence confirmed by photon detectors on both sides of the mirror.

Since plasmons are not exactly like photons, they cannot be used in mirrored optical beam splitters. Therefore, to test for quantum interference in plasmons, Fakonas and his colleagues made two waveguide paths for the plasmons on the surface of a tiny silicon chip. Because plasmons are very lossy—that is, easily absorbed into materials that surround them—the path is kept short, contained within a 10-micron-square chip, which reduces absorption along the way.

The waveguides, which together form a device called a directional coupler, act as a functional equivalent to a 50/50 beam splitter, directing the paths of the two plasmons to interfere with one another. The plasmons can exit the waveguides at one of two output paths that are each observed by a detector; if both plasmons exit the directional coupler together—meaning that quantum interference is observed—the pair of plasmons will only set off one of the two detectors.

Indeed, the experiment confirmed that two indistinguishable photons can be converted into two indistinguishable surface plasmons that, like photons, display quantum interference.

This finding could be important for the development of quantum computing, says Atwater. "Remarkably, plasmons are coherent enough to exhibit quantum interference in waveguides," he says. "These plasmon waveguides can be integrated in compact chip-based devices and circuits, which may one day enable computation and measurement schemes based on quantum interference."

Before this experiment, some researchers wondered if the photon–metal interaction necessary to create a surface plasmon would prevent the plasmons from exhibiting quantum interference. "Our experiment shows this is not a concern," Fakonas says.

"We learned something new about the quantum mechanics of surface plasmons. The main thing is that we were able to validate the theoretical prediction; we showed that this type of interference is possible with plasmons, and we did a pretty clean measurement," he says. "The quantum interference displayed by plasmons appeared to be almost identical to that of photons, so I think it would be very difficult for someone to design a different structure that would improve upon this result."

The work was published in a paper titled "Two-plasmon quantum interference." In addition to Fakonas and Atwater, the other coauthors are Caltech undergraduate Hyunseok Lee and former undergraduate Yousif A. Kelaita (BS '12). The work was supported by funding from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the waveguide was fabricated at the Kavli Nanoscience Institute at Caltech.

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Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Center for Student Services 360 (Workshop Space)

Teaching & Learning in the American System: Student-Teacher Interactions

Raiders of the Lost Can

There is more than one way to get an empty soup can to the top of a five-foot pyramid. One option might be to pick up the soup can with your hand, walk to the pyramid, and place it on top. But that would be the easy way out, and that's not how Caltech's mechanical engineering majors roll.

In fact, the students in this year's Mechanical Engineering 72 (ME72) class, a two-term engineering design lab for mechanical engineering majors, not only rolled, they crawled and flew their robotic inventions to deliver their team's soup can to the top of a wooden pyramid outfitted with steel ramps, while simultaneously deploying other robotic vehicles to conduct defensive maneuvers, preventing the opposing team from beating them to the top with their own color-coded soup can.

This was the 29th year of the ME72 competition, which doubles as the final exam for students enrolled in the class. Gathering in the Brown Gymnasium on March 11th were six teams, each composed of 3–5 students, along with 250 visiting middle school students from the Pasadena Unified School District and an enthusiastic crowd of alumni, onlookers, and photographers.

"This is the only time I have ever watched any sort of competition in a gym while I've been at Caltech," says Erika DeBenedictis, a senior from Blacker House. The spirit of competition was palpable as teams with names such as the Avengers, 40 Pc Chicken McNuggets, and Fellowship of the Can rallied to send their robots to the summit. There were midair collisions and numerous ground-based encounters that sometimes sent the much-sought soup can careening toward the bleachers while team members paced around the perimeter, driving their vehicles with handheld controllers.

The rules of this year's competition and the precise dimensions of the central pyramid were developed over the summer by ME72's instructor, Carl Ruoff, division technologist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Last October when the class began, each team was given $400 worth of controllers and batteries and an $800 budget to construct whatever vehicles they dreamed up to meet the soup can challenge. Working with Ruoff, lecturer John Van Deusen, four teaching assistants, and a machine shop assistant, students periodically demonstrated their vehicles in front of their competitors, although, says Sandra Fang, one of course's teaching assistants and a senior in mechanical engineering at Caltech, "they often conceal some of the capabilities of their vehicles from other teams."

Fang declined to declare a favorite at the outset of the competition. As a student in last year's ME72 class, she knows how rugged the process can be, though she admits, "most of the TAs do have a favorite. After watching them work so hard all year, you really want to see your favorite team win."

The Avengers team opted for two tractor-like vehicles named "The Hulk" and "Iron Man." "During the first term," says junior Derek Kearney, an Avenger team member, "we figured out how to drive them and turn them right and left. In the second term we worked on getting them to pick up the can and climb up the ramp." Caltech junior Richie Hernandez, another Avenger team member, pointed out the intricate network of bicycle chain, sprockets, rubber bands, and magnets that made "The Hulk" a formidable warrior in the competition.

For the visiting middle schoolers, Raiders of the Lost Can was the culmination of a day spent on the Caltech campus "taking a lab tour, hearing a lecture on neuroscience, and talking about the relationship between neuroscience and programming robotics," according to Mitch Aiken, Caltech's associate director for educational outreach.

The competition got off to a rocky start. In the first three heats (teams competed two at a time, in four-minute heats), no one had successfully moved their soup can to the top of the pyramid, though they came close several times, either pitching it over the top or pushing it partway up a ramp. But finally success was achieved, and at the end of the double-elimination competition, 40 Pc Chicken McNuggets emerged victorious. One suspects they retired to the golden arches to enjoy the product that fueled their success.

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Cynthia Eller
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Students Face Off in Mechanical Engineering Competition
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Caltech Appoints Diana Jergovic to Newly Created Position of Vice President for Strategy Implementation

Caltech has named Diana Jergovic as its vice president for strategy implementation. In the newly created position, Jergovic will collaborate closely with the president and provost, and with the division chairs, faculty, and senior leadership on campus and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to execute and integrate Caltech's strategic initiatives and projects and ensure that they complement and support the overall education and research missions of the campus and JPL. This appointment returns the number of vice presidents at the Institute to six.

"Supporting the faculty is Caltech's highest priority," says Edward Stolper, provost and interim president, "and as we pursue complex interdisciplinary and institutional initiatives, we do so with the expectation that they will evolve over a long time horizon. The VP for strategy implementation will help the Institute ensure long-term success for our most important new activities."

In her present role as associate provost for academic and budgetary initiatives at the University of Chicago, Jergovic serves as a liaison between the Office of the Provost and the other academic and administrative offices on campus, and advances campus-wide strategic initiatives. She engages in efforts spanning every university function, including development, major construction, and budgeting, as well as with faculty governance and stewardship matters. Jergovic also serves as chief of staff to University of Chicago provost Thomas F. Rosenbaum, Caltech's president-elect.

"In order to continue Caltech's leadership role and to define new areas of eminence, we will inevitably have to forge new partnerships and collaborations—some internal, some external, some both," Rosenbaum says. "The VP for strategy implementation is intended to provide support for the faculty and faculty leaders in realizing their goals for the most ambitious projects and collaborations, implementing ideas and helping create the structures that make them possible. I was looking for a person who had experience in delivering large-scale projects, understood deeply the culture of a top-tier research university, and could think creatively about a national treasure like JPL."

"My career has evolved in an environment where faculty governance is paramount," Jergovic says. "Over the years, I have cultivated a collaborative approach working alongside a very dedicated faculty leadership. My hope is to bring this experience to Caltech and to integrate it into the existing leadership team in a manner that simultaneously leverages my strengths and allows us together to ensure that the Institute continues to flourish, to retain its position as the world's leading research university, and to retain its recognition as such."

Prior to her position as associate provost, Jergovic was the University of Chicago's assistant vice president for research and education, responsible for the financial management and oversight of all administrative aspects of the Office of the Vice President for Research and Argonne National Laboratory. She engaged in research-related programmatic planning with a special emphasis on the interface between the university and Argonne National Laboratory. This ranged from the development of the university's Science and Technology Outreach and Mentoring Program (STOMP), a weekly outreach program administered by university faculty, staff, and students in low-income neighborhood schools on the South Side of Chicago, to extensive responsibilities with the university's successful bid to retain management of Argonne National Laboratory.

From 1994 to 2001, Jergovic was a research scientist with the university-affiliated National Opinion Research Center (NORC) and, in 2001, served as project director for NORC's Florida Ballot Project, an initiative that examined, classified, and created an archive of the markings on Florida's 175,000 uncertified ballots from its contested 2000 presidential election.

Jergovic earned a BS in psychology and an MA and PhD in developmental psychology, all from Loyola University Chicago, and an MBA from the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago.

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An Equation to Describe the Competition Between Genes

Caltech researchers develop and verify predictive mathematical model

In biology, scientists typically conduct experiments first, and then develop mathematical or computer models afterward to show how the collected data fit with theory. In his work, Rob Phillips flips that practice on its head. The Caltech biophysicist tackles questions in cellular biology as a physicist would—by first formulating a model that can make predictions and then testing those predictions. Using this strategy, Phillips and his group have recently developed a mathematical model that accounts for the way genes compete with each other for the proteins that regulate their expression.

A paper describing the work appears in the current issue of the journal Cell. The lead authors on the paper are Robert Brewster and Franz Weinert, postdoctoral scholars in Phillips's lab.

"The thing that makes this study really interesting is that we did our calculations before we ever did any experiments," says Phillips, the Fred and Nancy Morris Professor of Biophysics and Biology at Caltech and principal investigator on the study. "Just as it is amazing that we have equations for the orbits of planets around stars, I think it's amazing that we are beginning to be able to write equations that predict the complex behaviors of a living cell."

A number of research teams are interested in modeling gene expression—accurately describing all the processes involved in going from a gene to the protein or other product encoded by that DNA. For simplicity's sake, though, most such models do not take competition into consideration. Instead, they assume that each gene has plenty of whatever it needs in order to be expressed—including the regulatory proteins called transcription factors. However, Phillips points out, there often is not enough transcription factor around to regulate all of the genes in a cell.  For one thing, multiple copies of a gene can exist within the same cell. For example, in the case of genes expressed on circular pieces of DNA known as plasmids, it is common to find hundreds of copies in a single cell. In addition, many transcription factors are capable of binding to a variety of different genes. So, as in a game of musical chairs, the genes must compete for a scarce resource—the transcription factors.

Phillips and his colleagues wanted to create a more realistic model by adding in this competition. To do so, they looked at how the level of gene expression varies depending on the amount of transcription factor present in the cell. To limit complexity, they worked with a relatively simple case—a gene in the bacterium E. coli that has just one binding site where a transcription factor can attach. In this case, when the transcription factor binds to the gene, it actually prevents the gene from making its product—it represses expression.

To build their mathematical model, the researchers first considered all the various ways in which the available transcription factor can interact with the copies of this particular gene that are present in the cell, and then developed a statistical theory to represent the situation.

"Imagine that you go into an auditorium, and you know there are a certain number of seats and a certain number of people. There are many different seating arrangements that could accommodate all of those people," Phillips says. "If you wanted to, you could systematically enumerate all of those arrangements and figure out things about the statistics—how often two people will be sitting next to each other if it's purely random, and so on. That's basically what we did with these genes and transcription factors."

Using the resulting model, the researchers were able to make predictions about what would happen if the level of transcription factor and the number of gene copies were independently varied so that the proteins were either in high demand or there were plenty to go around, for example.

With predictions in hand, the researchers next conducted experiments while looking at E. coli cells under a microscope. To begin, they introduced the genes on plasmids into the cells. They needed to track exactly how much transcription factor was present and the rate of gene expression in the presence of that level of transcription factor. Using fluorescent proteins, they were able to follow these changes in the cell over time: the transcription factor lit up red, while the protein expressed by the gene without the transcription factor attached glowed green. Using video fluorescence microscopy and a method, developed in the lab of Caltech biologist Michael Elowitz, for determining the brightness of a single molecule, the researchers were able to count the level of transcription factor present and the rate at which the green protein was produced as the cells grew and divided.

The team found that the experimental data matched the predictions they had made extremely well. "As expected, we find that there are two interesting regimes," says Brewster. "One is that there's just not enough protein to fill the demand. Therefore, all copies of the gene cannot be repressed simultaneously, and some portion will glow green all the time. In that case, there are correlations between the various copies of the genes. They know, in some sense, that the others exist. The second case is that there is a ton of this transcription factor around; in that case, the genes act almost exactly as if the other genes aren't there—there is enough protein to shut off all of the genes simultaneously."

The data fit so well with their model, in fact, that Phillips and his colleagues were able to use plots of the data to predict how many copies of the plasmid would be found in a cell as it grew and multiplied at various points throughout the cell cycle.

"Many times in science you start out trying to understand something, and then you get so good at understanding it that you are able to use it as a tool to measure something else," says Phillips. "Our model has become a tool for measuring the dynamics of how plasmids multiply. And the dynamics of how they multiply isn't what we would have naively expected. That's a little hint that we're pursuing right now."

Overall, he says, "this shows that the assertion that biology is too complicated to be predictive might be overly pessimistic, at least in the context of bacteria."

The work described in the paper, "The Transcription Factor Titration Effect Dictates Level of Gene Expression," was supported by the National Institutes of Health and by the Fondation Pierre-Gilles de Gennes. Additional coauthors are Mattias Rydenfelt, a graduate student in physics at Caltech; Hernan Garcia, a former member of Phillips's lab who is now at Princeton University; and Dan Song, a graduate student at Harvard Medical School.

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Kimm Fesenmaier
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Bending the Light with a Tiny Chip

A silicon chip developed by Caltech researchers acts as a lens-free projector—and could one day end up in your cell phone.

Imagine that you are in a meeting with coworkers or at a gathering of friends. You pull out your cell phone to show a presentation or a video on YouTube. But you don't use the tiny screen; your phone projects a bright, clear image onto a wall or a big screen. Such a technology may be on its way, thanks to a new light-bending silicon chip developed by researchers at Caltech.

The chip was developed by Ali Hajimiri, Thomas G. Myers Professor of Electrical Engineering, and researchers in his laboratory. The results were presented at the Optical Fiber Communication (OFC) conference in San Francisco on March 10.

Traditional projectors—like those used to project a film or classroom lecture notes—pass a beam of light through a tiny image, using lenses to map each point of the small picture to corresponding, yet expanded, points on a large screen. The Caltech chip eliminates the need for bulky and expensive lenses and bulbs and instead uses a so-called integrated optical phased array (OPA) to project the image electronically with only a single laser diode as light source and no mechanically moving parts.

Hajimiri and his colleagues were able to bypass traditional optics by manipulating the coherence of light—a property that allows the researchers to "bend" the light waves on the surface of the chip without lenses or the use of any mechanical movement. If two waves are coherent in the direction of propagation—meaning that the peaks and troughs of one wave are exactly aligned with those of the second wave—the waves combine, resulting in one wave, a beam with twice the amplitude and four times the energy as the initial wave, moving in the direction of the coherent waves.

"By changing the relative timing of the waves, you can change the direction of the light beam," says Hajimiri. For example, if 10 people kneeling in line by a swimming pool slap the water at the exact same instant, they will make one big wave that travels directly away from them. But if the 10 separate slaps are staggered—each person hitting the water a half a second after the last—there will still be one big, combined wave, but with the wave bending to travel at an angle, he says.

Using a series of pipes for the light—called phase shifters—the OPA chip similarly slows down or speeds up the timing of the waves, thus controlling the direction of the light beam. To form an image, electronic data from a computer are converted into multiple electrical currents; by applying stronger or weaker currents to the light within the phase shifter, the number of electrons within each light path changes—which, in turn, changes the timing of the light wave in that path. The timed light waves are then delivered to tiny array elements within a grid on the chip. The light is then projected from each array in the grid, the individual array beams combining coherently in the air to form a single light beam and a spot on the screen.

As the electronic signal rapidly steers the beam left, right, up, and down, the light acts as a very fast pen, drawing an image made of light on the projection surface. Because the direction of the light beam is controlled electronically—not mechanically—it can create a sort of line very quickly. Since the light draws many times per second, the eye sees the process as a single image instead of a moving light beam, says Hajimiri.

"The new thing about our work is really that we can do this on a tiny, one-millimeter-square silicon chip, and the fact that we can do it very rapidly—rapidly enough to form images, since we phase-shift electronically in two dimensions," says Behrooz Abiri, a graduate student in Hajimiri's group and a coauthor on the paper. So far, the images Hajimiri and his team can project with the current version of the chip are somewhat simple—a triangle, a smiley face, or single letters, for example. However, the researchers are currently experimenting with larger chips that include more light-delivering array elements that—like using a larger lens on a camera—can improve the resolution and increase the complexity of the projected images.

In their recent experiments, Hajimiri and his colleagues have used the silicon chip to project images in infrared light, but additional work with different types of semiconductors will also allow the researchers to expand the tiny projector's capabilities into the visible spectrum. "Right now we are using silicon technology, which works better with infrared light. If you want to project visible light, you can take the exact same architecture and do it in what's called compound semiconductor III-V technology," says Firooz Aflatouni, another coauthor on the paper, who in January finished his two-year postdoctoral appointment at Caltech and joined the University of Pennsylvania as an assistant professor. "Silicon is good because it can be easily integrated into electronics, but these other compound semiconductors could be used to do the same thing."

"In the future, this can be incorporated into a phone, and since there is no need for a lens, you can have a phone that acts as a projector all by itself," Hajimiri says. However, although the chip could easily be incorporated into a cell phone, he points out that a tiny projection device can have many applications—including light-based radar systems (called "LIDAR"), which are used in positioning, robotics, geographical measurements, and mapmaking. Such equipment already exists, but current LIDAR technology requires complex, bulky, and expensive equipment—equipment that could be streamlined and simplified to a single chip at a much lower cost.

"But I don't want to limit the device to just a few purposes. The beauty of this thing is that these chips are small and can be made at a very low cost—and this opens up lots of interesting possibilities," he says.

These results were described in a presentation titled "Electronic Two-Dimensional Beam Steering for Integrated Optical Phased Arrays." Along with Hajimiri, Abiri, and Aflatouni, Caltech senior Angad Rekhi also contributed to the work. The study was funded by grants from the Caltech Innovation Initiative, and the Information Science and Technology initiative at Caltech.

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Monday, March 17, 2014
Jorgensen Lobby

Caltech New Media Art Exhibition

Monday, March 31, 2014
Center for Student Services 360 (Workshop Space)

Unleashing Collaborative Learning through Technology: A Study of Tablet-Mediated Student Learning

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