Monday, April 1, 2013
Center for Student Services, 3rd Floor, Brennan Conference Room – Center for Student Services

Head TA Network Kick-off Meeting & Happy Hour

03/07/2013 13:42:29
Douglas Smith
Francis H. Clauser (BS '34, MS '35, PhD '37), the Clark Blanchard Millikan Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, passed away on March 3, 2013, at age 99. Born in the decade following the Wright Brothers' first powered flight, he was a founder of modern aeronautics and helped usher in the Space Age.
03/11/2013 08:08:49
Kimm Fesenmaier
A team of Caltech engineers, for the first time ever, has developed electronic chips that repair themselves.
02/11/2013 14:14:33
Douglas Smith
What makes an earthquake go off? Why are earthquakes so difficult to forecast? Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Geophysics Nadia Lapusta gives us a close-up look at the moving parts, as it were, at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 13, 2013, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
02/10/2013 16:34:18
Kimm Fesenmaier
Richard M. Murray and Michael Ortiz of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, an honor considered among the highest professional distinctions that an engineer can receive. In total, the academy welcomed 69 new American members and 11 foreign associates this year.
02/07/2013 19:35:51
Kimm Fesenmaier
Laying the groundwork for an on-chip optical quantum network, a team of Caltech researchers has shown that defects in diamond can be used as quantum building blocks that interact with one another via photons, the basic units of light.
01/31/2013 11:16:14
Katie Neith
The recent renovations of the Jorgensen Laboratory included many upgrades that were designed to reflect Caltech's commitment to sustainability. Now the building has achieved LEED Platinum certification, the highest honor of the U.S. Green Building Council.
01/22/2013 09:40:51
Douglas Smith
At Caltech, Guruswami "Ravi" Ravichandran studies impacts that pack a wallop of up to a million times the pressure of Earth's atmosphere.
01/17/2013 11:58:00
Katie Neith
When Matanya Horowitz started his undergraduate work in 2006 at University of Colorado at Boulder, he knew that he wanted to work in robotics—mostly because he was disappointed that technology had not yet made good on his sci-fi–inspired dreams of humanoid robots. "The best thing we had at the time was the Roomba, which is a great product, but compared to science fiction it seemed really diminutive," says Horowitz. He therefore decided to major in not just electrical engineering, but also economics, applied math, and computer science. "I thought that the answer to better robots would lie somewhere in the middle of these different subjects, and that maybe each one held a different key," he explains. Now a doctoral student at Caltech—he earned his masters in the same four years as his multiple undergrad degrees—Horowitz is putting his range of academic experience to work in the labs of engineers Joel Burdick and John Doyle to help advance robotics and intelligent systems
Friday, January 25, 2013

Course Ombudspeople Lunch