Niles Pierce Awarded 2003 Feynman Teaching Prize

Head says it all.

Caltech applied physicists invent waveguideto bypass diffraction limits for new optical devices

Four hundred years ago, a scientist could peer into one of the newfangled optical microscopes and see microorganisms, but nothing much smaller. Nowadays, a scientist can look in the latest generation of lens-based optical microscopes and also see, well, microorganisms, but nothing much smaller. The limiting factor has always been a fundamental property of the wave nature of light that fuzzes out images of objects much smaller than the wavelength of the light that illuminates those objects. This has hampered the ability to make and use optical devices smaller than the wavelength.

Caltech applied physicists create ultrahigh-Q microcavity on a silicon chip

In an advance that holds promise for integrating previously disparate functions on a chip, applied physicists at the California Institute of Technology have created a disk smaller than the diameter of a human hair that can store light energy at extremely high efficiency.

Fuel Cells: Powering Progress in the 21st Century

Watson lecture about fuel cells

Caltech Students to Clash--Robotically

ME 72 machine design competition.

Wu elected to Chinese Academy of Science

PASADENA, Calif. — The Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has announced that Theodore Yaotsu Wu, professor, emeritus, of engineering science at the California Institute of Technology, was elected as a Foreign Member of the Academy.

Wu, 78, who earned degrees from Shanghai Jiaotong University in China, Iowa State University, and a Ph.D. in aeronautics from Caltech in 1952, is being recognized for his work in fluid mechanics and for his international academic interaction and collaboration, especially with CAS.

White House names Caltech's Erik Winfree as Presidential Early Career Award winner

Erik Winfree, a computer expert who hopes someday to use DNA molecules to perform computations, has been named a 2002 winner of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The honor, announced June 27 by the White House, is made each year to young American scientists and engineers whose innovative work is expected to lead to future breakthroughs.

Winfree, 32, is an assistant professor of computer science and computation and neural systems at the California Institute of Technology. A Caltech graduate, he has been a member of the faculty since 1999.

Alquist Medal for earthquake safetyawarded to Caltech engineer

Wilfred Iwan, a professor of applied mechanics at the California Institute of Technology, has been named the 2002 recipient of the Alquist Medal by the California Earthquake Safety Foundation.

Iwan, who is also director of Caltech's Earthquake Engineering Research Laboratory, was chosen for the award in honor of "his lifetime of service to the profession of structural engineering and its application to the safety of the people of California and the world," the foundation announced.

Caltech's annual machine competitionto be held December 6

Caltech mechanical engineering students are putting in quality tool time these days to prepare for the annual ME 72 engineering design contest, a celebrated campus event in which teams of robot rovers are pitted against each other in a test of engineering design acumen, strategy, teamwork, and sheer driving skill.

This year's contest, the 17th in the annual series, will be held at 2 p.m., Thursday, December 6, in Beckman Auditorium on the Caltech campus.

Machinist provides undergrads withquality time in the Caltech shop

Machinist John Van Deusen looks on approvingly as two Caltech undergraduates prepare to see how well their new robot climbs a curved wall.

The robot performs its task admirably—not necessarily a foregone conclusion in the Caltech machine shop, where dysfunctional robots have been known to come into creation. Van Deusen, ever the diplomat, passes by without commenting one way or the other.

"In ME 72 we bite our tongues a lot," Van Deusen says later. The robot the two undergrads have built is pretty much a set of felt-lined caterpillar treads linked by a single aluminum bar.

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