Caltech Researchers Reveal Three Distinct Modes of Dynamic Friction Rupture with Implications for Earthquake Behavior

A new study by researchers at the California Institute of Technology has revealed important findings about the nature of ruptures and sliding behavior, which could impact how we respond to earthquakes and other disasters.

Caltech Researchers Announce Invention of the Optofluidic Microscope

The old optical microscopes that everyone used in high-school biology class may be a step closer to the glass heap. Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have announced their invention of an optofluidic microscope that uses no lens elements and could revolutionize the diagnosis of certain diseases such as malaria.

Researchers Announce New Way to Assess How Buildings Would Stand Up in Big Quakes

How much damage will certain steel-frame, earthquake-resistant buildings located in Southern California sustain when a large temblor strikes? It's a complicated, multifaceted question, and researchers from the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the University of Pau, France, have answered it with unprecedented specificity using a new modeling protocol.

Physicists Devise New Technique for Detecting Heavy Water

Scientists at the California Institute of Technology have created a new method of detecting heavy water that is 30 times more sensitive than any other existing method. The detection method could be helpful in the fight against international nuclear proliferation.

Jerry Marsden Elected to Royal Society

Jerry Marsden, the Carl F. Braun Professor of Engineering and Control and Dynamical Systems at the California Institute of Technology, has been named a member of the Royal Society of the United Kingdom. Marsden joins 43 other scientists as the new inductees of a society that through the years has counted Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin, Albert Einstein, and Stephen Hawking among its members.

Aerospace Engineers and Biologists Solve Long-Standing Heart Development Mystery

An engineer comparing the human adult heart and the embryo heart might never guess that the former developed from the latter. While the adult heart is a fist-shaped organ with chambers and valves, the embryo heart looks more like tube attached to smaller tubes. Physicians and researchers have assumed for years, in fact, that the embryonic heart pumps through peristaltic movements, much as material flows through the digestive system.

Candes Receives Waterman Award

Emmanuel Candes, an applied mathematician in the Division of Engineering and Applied Science at the California Institute of Technology, has been selected to receive the National Science Board's prestigious Alan T. Waterman Award, the highest honor awarded by the National Science Foundation.

Fluid Mechanics Experts Come Up with New Test for Heart Disease

Building on years of research on the way that blood flows through the heart valves, researchers from the California Institute of Technology and Oregon Health Science University have devised a new index for cardiac health based on a simple ultrasound test. The index is now ready for use, and provides a new diagnostic tool for cardiologists in searching for the very early signs of certain heart diseases.

Murray Awarded Feynman Teaching Prize

Richard M. Murray was a freshman attending frosh camp at Camp Fox on Catalina Island when he first encountered famed physicist Richard Feynman. "I was sitting down, looking across a field, and a professor sat down next to me and started talking about some shells he had found while he was swimming. Lo and behold, it was Richard Feynman-although I was an engineering student and not in physics, and I'm not sure I knew who he was at the time. That willingness to talk to a student typified his approach to teaching."

Caltech Scientist Creates New Method for Folding Strands of DNA to Make Microscopic Structures

In a new development in nanotechnology, a researcher at the California Institute of Technology has devised a way of weaving DNA strands into any desired two-dimensional shape or figure, which he calls "DNA origami."

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