Tuesday, December 10, 2013
Noyes 153 (J. Holmes Sturdivant Lecture Hall) – Arthur Amos Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics

Advice for Future New Faculty: Caltech Postdoc Association Event

Friday, January 10, 2014
Center for Student Services 360 (Workshop Space) – Center for Student Services

Undergraduate Teaching Assistant Orientation

Caltech Names Thomas F. Rosenbaum as New President

To: The Caltech Community

From: Fiona Harrison, Benjamin M. Rosen Professor of Physics and Astronomy, and Chair, Faculty Search Committee; and David Lee, Chair, Board of Trustees, and Chair, Trustee Selection Committee

Today it is our great privilege to announce the appointment of Thomas F. Rosenbaum as the ninth president of the California Institute of Technology.

Dr. Rosenbaum, 58, is currently the John T. Wilson Distinguished Service Professor of Physics at the University of Chicago, where he has served as the university's provost for the past seven years. As a distinguished physicist and expert on condensed matter physics, Dr. Rosenbaum has explored the quantum mechanical nature of materials, making major contributions to the understanding of matter near absolute zero, where such quantum mechanical effects dominate. His experiments in quantum phase transitions in matter are recognized as having played a key role in placing these transitions on a theoretical level equivalent to that which has been developed for classical systems.

But Dr. Rosenbaum's scientific achievements were not solely what captured and held the attention of those involved in the presidential search. We on the search committee were impressed by Dr. Rosenbaum's deep dedication, as Chicago's provost, to both undergraduate and graduate education—both critical parts of Caltech's mission. He has had responsibility for an unusually broad range of institutions and intellectual endeavors. Among his achievements as provost was the establishment of the Institute for Molecular Engineering in 2011, the University of Chicago's very first engineering program, in collaboration with Argonne National Lab.

We also believe that Dr. Rosenbaum's focus on strengthening the intellectual ties between the University of Chicago and Argonne National Lab will serve him well in furthering the Caltech-JPL relationship.

As provost, Dr. Rosenbaum was also instrumental in establishing collaborative educational programs serving communities around Chicago's Hyde Park campus, including the university's founding of a four-campus charter school that was originally designed to further fundamental research in education but which has also achieved extraordinary college placement results for disadvantaged Chicago youths.

This successful conclusion to our eight-month presidential search was result of the hard work of the nine-member Faculty Search Committee, chaired by Fiona Harrison, and the 10-member Trustee Selection Committee, chaired by David Lee. We are grateful both to the trustees and faculty on our two committees who made our job so very easy as well as to those faculty, students, staff, and alumni who provided us with input and wisdom as we scoured the country for just the right person for our Caltech.

"Tom embodies all the qualities the faculty committee hoped to find in our next president," Harrison says. "He is a first-rate scholar and someone who understands at a deep level the commitment to fundamental inquiry that characterizes Caltech. He is also the kind of ambitious leader who will develop the faculty's ideas into the sorts of innovative ventures that will maintain Caltech's position of prominence in the next generation of science and technology."

"The combination of deep management experience and visionary leadership Tom brings will serve Caltech extremely well in the coming years," Lee adds. "The Board is excited about collaborating closely with Tom to propel the Institute to new levels of scientific leadership."

"The Caltech community's palpable and deep commitment to the Institute came through in all my conversations, and it forms the basis for Caltech's and JPL's lasting impact," Dr. Rosenbaum says. "It will be a privilege to work closely with faculty, students, staff, and trustees to explore new opportunities, building on Caltech's storied accomplishments."

Dr. Rosenbaum received his bachelor's degree in physics with honors from Harvard University in 1977, and both an MA and PhD in physics from Princeton University in 1979 and 1982, respectively. He did research at Bell Laboratories and at IBM Watson Research Center before joining the University of Chicago's faculty in 1983. Dr. Rosenbaum directed the university's Materials Research Laboratory from 1991 to 1994 and its interdisciplinary James Franck Institute from 1995 to 2001 before serving as vice president for research and for Argonne National Laboratory from 2002 to 2006. He was named the university's provost in 2007. His honors include an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, a Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the William McMillan Award for "outstanding contributions to condensed matter physics." Dr. Rosenbaum is an elected fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Joining the Caltech faculty will be Dr. Rosenbaum's spouse, Katherine T. Faber, the Walter P. Murphy Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University. Dr. Faber's research focuses on understanding stress fractures in ceramics, as well as on the fabrication of ceramic materials with controlled porosity, which are important as thermal and environmental barrier coatings for engine components. Dr. Faber is also the codirector of the Northwestern University-Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts (NU-ACCESS), which employs advanced materials science techniques for art history and restoration. Dr. Rosenbaum and Dr. Faber have two sons, Daniel, who graduated from the University of Chicago in 2012, and Michael, who is currently a junior there.

Dr. Rosenbaum will succeed Jean-Lou Chameau, who served the Institute from 2006 to 2013, and will take over the helm from interim president and provost Ed Stolper on July 1, 2014. The board, the search committee, and, indeed, the entire Institute owes Dr. Stolper a debt of gratitude for his unwavering commitment to Caltech, and for seamlessly continuing the Institute's forward momentum through his interim presidency.

As you meet Dr. Rosenbaum today and over the coming months, and learn more about his vision for Caltech's future, we believe that you will quickly come to see why he is so well suited to guide Caltech as we continue to pursue bold investigations in science and engineering, to ready the next generation of scientific and thought leaders, and to benefit humankind through research that is integrated with education.

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Caltech Nobelist Zewail Named to UN Scientific Advisory Board

Ahmed Zewail, Linus Pauling Professor of Chemistry and professor of physics, has been selected as one of 26 members of a new Scientific Advisory Board established by the United Nations secretary-general.

The board, which will meet twice per year, will provide advice on science, technology, and innovation concerning sustainable development to the secretary-general and the heads of UN organizations. The creation of this new board, which was formally announced September 24 at the UN's first High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development, was the result of a recommendation from the report of the High-Level Panel on Global Sustainability in January 2012.

Made up of scientists from various fields in the natural, social, and human sciences, the board will have the main objective of improving the linkage between science and policy and of ensuring that up-to-date and rigorous science is reflected in policy discussions within the UN. In addition, board members will also advise on issues related to the public visibility and public understanding of science. The United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) will serve as the secretariat of the board.

"I am pleased to be a member of this United Nations Scientific Advisory Board. Its objectives coincide with my vision to promote science in education and science in diplomacy," Zewail says. "The UN is an excellent platform for an outreach to all nations."

In 1999, Professor Zewail was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing the field of femtochemistry, which uses ultrashort laser flashes to enable the study of chemical reactions in real time at the scale of quadrillionths of a second. He and his group later developed a technique called four-dimensional electron microscopy for the direct imaging of matter in the three dimensions of space and in time with applications spanning the physical and biological sciences.

He is currently director of the Center for Physical Biology at Caltech funded by the Moore Foundation.

Zewail's new involvement with the UN reflects his long-standing interest in global affairs, particularly as they relate to science, education, and world peace. His commentaries on such global issues have been presented in numerous articles, a number of books, and public addresses all over the world. Since the 2011 revolution in Egypt—his native country—Zewail has also played a critical role in that nation's events.

In addition to his international interests, Zewail has been involved in domestic science policy. In 2009, he was appointed to President Obama's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, and he was named the first U.S. Science Envoy to the Middle East as part of a program sponsored by the White House and the State Department to foster science and technology collaborations between the United States and nations throughout the Middle East, North Africa, and South and Southeast Asia.

Among other honors, Zewail has received the Albert Einstein World Award of Science, the Benjamin Franklin Medal, the Robert A. Welch Award, the Leonardo da Vinci Award, the Wolf Prize, the Priestley Medal, and the King Faisal International Prize. He is a recipient of the Grand Collar of the Order of the Nile, Egypt's highest state honor, and has been featured on postage stamps issued to honor his contributions to science and humanity. Zewail holds honorary degrees from 40 universities around the world and is an elected member of many professional academies and societies, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, The Royal Society of London, and the Swedish, Russian, Chinese, and French academies. In recognition of his contributions as a world leader in science and public service, he has received the Top American Leaders award given jointly by the Washington Post and Harvard Kennedy School's Center for Public Leadership.

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Caltech Named World's Top University in Times Higher Education Global Ranking

For the third year in a row, the California Institute of Technology has been rated the world's number one university in the Times Higher Education global ranking of the top 200 universities.

Harvard University, Oxford University, Stanford University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology round out the top five schools in the 2013–2014 rankings.

Times Higher Education compiled the listing using the same methodology as in the 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 surveys. Thirteen performance indicators representing research (worth 30 percent of a school's overall ranking score), teaching (30 percent), citations (30 percent), international outlook (which includes the total numbers of international students and faculty and the ratio of scholarly papers with international collaborators, 7.5 percent), and industry income (a measure of innovation, 2.5 percent) make up the data. The data were collected, analyzed, and verified by Thomson Reuters.

The Times Higher Education site has the full list of the world's top 400 schools and all of the performance indicators.

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Kathy Svitil
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Friday, October 4, 2013

Undergraduate Teaching Assistant Orientation

Caltech Researchers Synthesize Catalyst Important In Nitrogen Fixation

Inspired by an enzyme in soil microorganisms, researchers develop first synthetic iron-based catalyst for the conversion of nitrogen to ammonia.

As farming strategies have evolved to provide food for the world's growing population, the manufacture of nitrogen fertilizers through the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia has taken on increased importance.

The industrial technique used to make these fertilizers employs a chemical reaction that mirrors that of a natural process—nitrogen fixation. Unfortunately, vast amounts of energy, in the form of high heat and pressure, are required to drive the reaction. Now, inspired by the natural processes that take place in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms, researchers at Caltech have synthesized an iron-based catalyst that allows for nitrogen fixation under much milder conditions.

In the early 20th century, scientists discovered a way to artificially produce ammonia for the manufacture of commercial fertilizers, through a nitrogen fixation technique called the Haber-Bosch process. Today, this process is used industrially to produce more than 130 million tons of ammonia annually. Microorganisms in the soil that live near the roots of certain plants can produce a similar amount of ammonia each year—but instead of using high heat and pressure, they benefit from enzyme catalysts, called nitrogenases, that convert nitrogen from the air into ammonia at room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

In work described in the September 5 issue of Nature, Caltech graduate students John Anderson and Jon Rittle, under the supervision of their research adviser Jonas Peters, Bren Professor of Chemistry and executive officer for chemistry, have developed the first molecular iron complex that catalyzes nitrogen fixation, modeling the natural enzymes found in nitrogen-fixing soil organisms. The research may eventually lead to the development of more environmentally friendly methods of ammonia production.

Natural nitrogenase enzymes, which prime inert atmospheric nitrogen for fixation through the addition of electrons and protons, generally contain two metals, molybdenum and iron. Over decades of research, this duality has caused a number of debates about which metal was actually responsible for nitrogenase's catalytic activity. Since a few research groups had modest success in synthesizing molybdenum-based molecular catalysts, many in the field believed that the debate had been settled. The discovery by Peters' group that synthetic iron complexes are also capable of this type of catalytic activity will reopen the discussion.

This finding, along with a wealth of data from structural biologists, biochemists, and spectroscopists, suggests that it may be iron—and not molybdenum—that is the key player in the nitrogen fixation in natural enzymes. The iron catalyst discovered by Peters and his colleagues may also help unravel the mystery of how these enzymes perform this reaction at the molecular level.

"We've pursued this type of synthetic iron catalyst for about a decade, and have banged our heads against plenty of walls in the process. So have a lot of other very talented folks in my field, and some for much longer than a decade," Peters says.

The finding is a first for the field, but Peters says that their current iron-based catalyst has limitations—the Haber-Bosch process is still the industrial standard. "Now that we finally have an example that actually works, everyone wants to know: 'Can it be used to make ammonia more efficiently?' The simple answer, for now, is no. While we're delighted to finally have our hands on an iron fixation catalyst, it's pretty inefficient and dies quickly. But," he adds, "this catalyst is a really important advance for us; there is so much we will now be able to learn from it that we couldn't before."

Funding for the research outlined in the Nature paper, titled "Catalytic conversion of nitrogen to ammonia by an iron model complex," was provided by the National Institutes of Health and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

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Arnold Appointed New Director of Rosen Bioengineering Center

Now in its sixth year of exploring the intersection between biology and engineering, the Donna and Benjamin M. Rosen Bioengineering Center has chosen Caltech professor Frances Arnold as its new director. Arnold, the Dick and Barbara Dickinson Professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering and Biochemistry began her tenure as director on June 1.

A recipient of the 2011 National Medal of Technology and Innovation, Arnold pioneered methods of "directed evolution" – processes now widely used to create biological catalysts that are important in the production of fuels from renewable resources. She was selected for the directorship because "of her demonstrated leadership in the field of bioengineering," says Stephen Mayo, William K. Bowes Jr. Foundation Chair of the Division of Biology and Biological Engineering.

The Rosen Center supports bioengineering research through the funding of fellows and faculty from many disciplines, including applied physics, chemical engineering, synthetic biology, and computer science.

"Bioengineering is an incredibly exciting field right now," Arnold says. "Solutions to some of the biggest problems in science, medicine, and sustainability will come from the interface between biology and engineering, and Caltech is well positioned to be at the forefront. The Rosen Center will help make that happen with innovative programs for bioengineering research and education."

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Tom Miller Wins Teacher-Scholar Award

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation has recognized Thomas F. Miller, professor of chemistry at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), with a 2013 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award.

The award provides a $75,000 unrestricted research grant to "support the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences," according to the foundation.

"I am very grateful to my colleagues in the Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division here at Caltech for nominating me for this award," Miller says. "I am also thankful to the Dreyfus Foundation for its generous grant, which will greatly benefit my research efforts."

Miller is an expert in developing theoretical and computational methods to understand a variety of molecular processes including enzyme catalysis, solar energy conversion, dendrite formation in lithium batteries, and the transport of proteins across cell membranes.

The Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards program is open to institutions in the United States that offer a bachelor's degree or higher in the chemical sciences, biochemistry, materials chemistry, and chemical engineering. Academic institutions may nominate one researcher per year for the award.

Miller earned a bachelor of science degree from Texas A&M University in 2000 and a PhD at the University of Oxford in 2005. He became an assistant professor at Caltech in 2008 and in 2013 was named professor of chemistry. He is the recipient of a Dreyfus New Faculty Award, Sloan Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation CAREER Award, American Chemical Society Hewlett-Packard Outstanding Junior Faculty Award, and an Associated Students of Caltech Teaching Award.

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John D. Roberts Awarded AIC Gold Medal

John D. Roberts, Institute Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) received the 2013 American Institute of Chemists Gold Medal. The AIC awarded the medal to Roberts at the Heritage Day event in April in Philadelphia hosted by its awarding partner, the Chemical Heritage Foundation (CHF).

The AIC established the Gold Medal, its highest award, in 1926 to recognize service to the science of chemistry and to the profession of chemist and chemical engineer in the United States. The Gold Medal has been presented jointly by the AIC and the CHF since 2003.

"I am very honored to have been selected to receive the American Institute of Chemists Gold Medal," Roberts says. "Throughout my career, I have been fortunate in being able to collaborate with the world's leading researchers, study and teach in highly respected institutions, and participate in some of the most important scientific discoveries since the middle of the 20th century."

Roberts is an expert on the leading research into the mechanisms of organic reactions, the chemistry of small ring compounds, and applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to organic chemistry and biochemistry. He serves on the boards of directors of Organic Syntheses Inc. and University Science Books, and was a consultant to DuPont from 1950 to 2008.

Roberts received his Ph.D. in chemistry from UCLA in 1944. Following a period as an instructor in chemistry there, Roberts was awarded a National Research Council Fellowship at Harvard University in 1945. He joined the staff of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1946, becoming an associate professor by 1950. In 1953, Roberts became a professor of organic chemistry at Caltech. In 1972, he was appointed Institute Professor of Chemistry and in 1988, Institute Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus and Lecturer. From 1980 to 1983 he served Caltech as vice president, provost, and dean of the faculty.

In addition to his many scientific achievements and chemistry lab discoveries, Roberts also was responsible for breaking the longstanding gender barrier at Caltech by sponsoring Dorothy Semenow (PhD '55) to become the Institute's first female doctoral candidate in 1953. Bringing Semenow from MIT to study at Caltech is "clearly the best thing I have done at Caltech in the 60 years I have been here," he says.

Roberts is a recipient of the American Chemical Society Award in Pure Chemistry (1954), the Priestley Medal (1987), the National Medal of Science and  the Welch Award in Chemistry (both in 1990), the Glenn T. Seaborg Medal (1991), the Chemical Pioneer Award of the American Institute of Chemists and the Arthur C. Cope Award of the American Chemical Society (both in 1994), the National Academy of Sciences Award in Chemical Sciences (1999), and the National Academy of Sciences Award for Chemistry in Service to Society (2009).

In 1998, Chemical & Chemical Engineering News named him as one of the 75 most influential chemists in the last 75 years. In 2008, he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and in 2009, Fellow of the American Chemical Society. He is a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences.

Roberts is the author, with M. C. Caserio, of Basic Principles of Organic Chemistry (1965 and 1977 editions) and has written other textbooks on NMR and Hückel molecular orbital calculations, and more than 500 scientific papers. ACS Books published his autobiography, The Right Place at the Right Time, in 1990.

The AIC is a professional organization dedicated to fostering the advancement of the chemical profession in the United States. Previous AIC Gold Medalists include Alfred Bader, Arnold O. Beckman, Paul Berg, Elizabeth Blackburn, Herbert C. Brown, F. Albert Cotton, Carl Djerassi, Walter Gilbert, Harry B. Gray, Ralph F. Hirschmann, Roald Hoffmann, Robert L. McNeil, Jr., Glenn T. Seaborg, Oliver Smithies, Max Tishler, and George M. Whitesides.

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