Science with a Smile

The choice of career path—from teacher to musician to engineer—often results from experiences during one's formative years. For children born after 1985, it's likely a certain bow-tied, rumple-haired figure wearing a blue lab coat figured prominently in the lives of those who went on to pursue science and technology.

"I really admire Bill Nye due to his ability to inject a lot of entertainment and fun into teaching," says Caltech graduate student Sho Takatori. He was one of those kids who grew up watching Bill Nye the Science Guy, the long-running and award-winning science education series that originally aired on PBS Kids. "His wacky blend of engaging science concepts, wild experimentation, and humor was very compelling. His enthusiasm really got me fired up about science."

Growing up in Sacramento, California, in the 1990s, Takatori was a loyal fan of the show's fast-paced blend of science and amusement. This appreciation would later inspire him in ways he could have never guessed. After realizing the depth of his zeal for science in high school, Takatori moved on to UC Berkeley to earn a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering. While there, he worked with the California Environmental Protection Agency to help draft regulatory policies for the California Green Chemistry Initiative, a regulatory effort to develop safer chemicals and consumer products through the principles of green chemistry.

Takatori now works in the lab of John F. Brady, Chevron Professor of Chemical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, where his work focuses on the fluid mechanics of particles suspended in liquids.."

Read more on the E&S website

Home Page Title: 
Science with a Smile
Writer: 
Exclude from News Hub: 
No
News Type: 
In Our Community
Exclude from Home Page: 
Home Page Summary: 
Inspired by Bill Nye’s blend of science and entertainment, Sho Takatori approaches his teaching and lab work with enthusiastic dedication.

National Academy of Inventors Names Three Caltech Fellows

Caltech professors Harry Atwater, Mark Davis, and Ali Hajimiri have been named as fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). According to the NAI press release, fellows are "academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society."

Harry Atwater is the Howard Hughes Professor of Applied Physics and Materials Science as well as the director of the Department of Energy Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP). His research focuses on photovoltaics and solar energy—he helped develop an artificial leaf as part of his work with JCAP—as well as plasmonics (oscillations of electrons on the surface of materials) and optical metamaterials (materials comprised of nanostructures). Atwater joined the Caltech faculty in 1988 and is a fellow of the Materials Research Society and member of U.S. National Academy of Engineering.

Mark Davis is the Warren and Katharine Schlinger Professor of Chemical Engineering and a member of the City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center and the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. Davis's research aims to synthesize catalytic materials called zeolites—crystalline solids made of silicon, aluminum, and oxygen and containing "micropores"—and biocompatible materials for the delivery of macromolecular therapeutics. Davis arrived at Caltech in 1991 and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Engineering. In 2014, he received the Prince of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Research. Davis is the holder of more than 50 U.S. patents.

Ali Hajimiri is the Thomas G. Myers Professor of Electrical Engineering, the executive officer for Electrical Engineering, and director of Information Science and Technology. Hajimiri's research covers broad areas within high-speed and high-frequency electronics- and photonics-integrated circuits. This year, the Hajimiri group synthesized a 3-D camera—called a nanophotonic coherent imager—that provides the highest depth-measurement accuracy (similar to resolution) of any such nanophotonic 3-D imaging device. He joined the Caltech faculty in 1998 and holds 78 issued U.S. patents. Hajimiri is also a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

The 2015 fellows account for more than 5,300 issued U.S. patents. This year's fellows will be inducted on April 15, 2016, as part of the Fifth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the United States Patent and Trademark Office in Virginia.

Writer: 
Lori Dajose
Home Page Title: 
NAI Names Three Caltech Fellows
Writer: 
Exclude from News Hub: 
No
News Type: 
In Our Community
Teaser Image: 
Exclude from Home Page: 

15 for 2015: The Year in Research News at Caltech

The year 2015 proved to be another groundbreaking year for research at Caltech. From seeing quantum motion, to reconfiguring jellyfish limbs, to measuring stellar magnetic fields, researchers continued to ask and answer the deepest scientific questions.

In case you missed any of them, here are 15 stories highlighting a few of the discoveries, methods, and technologies that came to life at Caltech in 2015.

 

 

Home Page Title: 
15 for 2015: The Year in Research News at Caltech
Writer: 
Exclude from News Hub: 
No
News Type: 
Research News
Exclude from Home Page: 
Home Page Summary: 
Here are 15 stories highlighting a few of the discoveries, methods, and technologies that came to life at Caltech in 2015.

15 for 2015: The Year in Research News at Caltech

Frontpage Title: 
15 for 2015: The Year in Research News at Caltech
Slideshow: 
Credit: K.Batygin/Caltech

New Research Suggests Solar System May Have Once Harbored Super-Earths

Thanks to recent surveys of exoplanets—planets in solar systems other than our own—we know that most planetary systems typically have one or more super-Earths (planets that are substantially more massive than Earth but less massive than Neptune) orbiting closer to their suns than Mercury does. In March, researchers showed that our own solar system may have once had these super-Earths, but they were destroyed by Jupiter's inward and outward migration through the solar system. This migration would have gravitationally flung small planetesimals through the solar system, setting off chains of collisions that would push any interior planets into the sun.
Credit: Lance Hayashida/Caltech and the Hoelz Laboratory/Caltech

Caltech Biochemists Shed Light on Cellular Mystery

The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is an intricate portal linking the cytoplasm of a cell to its nucleus. It is made up of many copies of about 34 different proteins. Around 2,000 NPCs are embedded in the nuclear envelope of a single human cell and each NPC shuttles hundreds of macromolecules of different shapes and sizes between the cytoplasm and nucleus. In February, Caltech biochemists determined the structure of a significant portion of the NPC called the outer rings; in August, the same group solved the structure of the pore's inner ring. Understanding the structure of the NPC could lead to new classes of cancer drugs as well as antiviral medicines.
Credit: iStockphoto

Research Suggests Brain's Melatonin May Trigger Sleep

For decades, supplemental melatonin has been sold over the counter as a sleep aid despite the absence of scientific evidence proving its effectiveness. Few studies have investigated melatonin produced naturally in the human body. This March, Caltech researchers studying zebrafish—animals that, like humans, are awake during the day and asleep at night—determined that the melatonin hormone does help the body fall asleep and stay asleep. Specifically, they found that zebrafish larvae that could not produce melatonin slept for only half as long as normal larvae.
Credit: Gregg Hallinan/Caltech

Advances in Radio Astronomy

In May, a new radio telescope array called the Owens Valley Long Wavelength Array (OV-LWA) saw its first light. Developed by a consortium led by Caltech, the OV-LWA has the ability to image simultaneously the entire sky at radio wavelengths with unmatched speed, helping astronomers to search for objects and phenomena that pulse, flicker, flare, or explode.

In July, Caltech researchers used both radio and optical telescopes to observe a brown dwarf located 20 light-years away and found that these so-called failed stars host powerful auroras near their magnetic poles.
Credit: Michael Abrams and Ty Basinger

Injured Jellyfish Seek to Regain Symmetry

Some kinds of animals can regrow lost limbs and body parts, but moon jellyfish have a different strategy. In June, Caltech researchers reported that the star-shaped eight-armed moon jellyfish rearranges itself when injured to maintain symmetry. It is hypothesized that the rearrangement helps to preserve the jellyfish's propulsion mechanism.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Geologists Characterize Nepal Earthquake

In April, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake rocked Nepal. While the damage was extensive, it was not as severe as many geologists predicted. This year, a Caltech team of geologists used satellite radar imaging data and measurements from seismic instruments in Nepal to create models of fault rupture and ground movement. They found that the quake ruptured only a small fraction of the "locked" tectonic plate and that there is still the potential for the locked portion to produce a large earthquake.
Credit: Caltech/JPL

New Polymer Creates Safer Fuels

Plane crashes cause devastating damage, but this damage is often exacerbated by the highly explosive nature of jet fuel. This October, researchers at Caltech and JPL discovered a polymeric fuel additive that can reduce the intensity of postimpact explosions that occur during accidents and crashes. Preliminary results show that the additive can provide this benefit without adversely affecting fuel performance. The polymer works by inhibiting "misting"—the process that causes fuel to rapidly disperse and easily catch fire—under crash conditions.
Credit: Spencer Kellis/Caltech

Controlling a Robotic Arm with a Patient's Intentions

When you reach for a glass of water, you do not consciously think about moving your arm muscles or grasping with your fingers—you think about the goal of the movement. This May, by implanting neural prosthetic devices into the posterior parietal cortex (PCC)—the region of the brain that governs intentions for movement—rather than the motor cortex, which controls movement, Caltech researchers enabled a paralyzed patient to more smoothly and naturally control a prosthetic limb. In November, the researchers showed that there are individual neurons in the PPC that encode for entire hand shapes, such as those used for grasping or gesturing.

 

Caltech Scientists Develop Cool Process to Make Better Graphene

Graphene is an ultrastrong and conductive material made of a single layer of carbon atoms. While it is a promising material for scientific and engineering advances, manufacturing it on an industrially relevant scale has proven to be impractical, requiring temperatures of around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit and long periods of time. A new technique invented at Caltech allows the speedy production of graphene—in just a few minutes—at room temperatures. The technique also produces graphene that is stronger, smoother, and more electrically conductive than normally produced synthetic graphene.
Credit: Rafael A. García (SAp CEA), Kyle Augustson (HAO), Jim Fuller (Caltech) & Gabriel Pérez (SMM, IAC), Photograph from AIA/SDO

Astronomers Peer Inside Stars, Finding Giant Magnets

Before this October, astronomers have only been able to study the magnetic fields of stars on the stellar surfaces. Now, using a technique called asteroseismology, scientists were able to probe the fusion-powered hearts of dozens of red giants (stars that are evolved versions of our sun) to calculate the magnetic field strengths inside those stars. They found that the internal magnetic fields of the red giants were as much as 10 million times stronger than Earth's magnetic field. Magnetic fields play a key role in the interior rotation rate of stars, which has a dramatic effect on how the stars evolve.
Credit: Chan Lei and Keith Schwab/Caltech

Seeing Quantum Motion

To the casual observer, an object at rest is just that—at rest, motionless. But on the subatomic scale, the object is most certainly in motion—quantum mechanical motion. Quantum motion, or noise, is ever-present in nature, and in August, Caltech researchers discovered how to observe and manipulate that motion in a small device. By creating what they called a "quantum squeezed state," they were able to periodically reduce the quantum fluctuations of the device. The ability to control quantum noise could one day be used to improve the precision of very sensitive measurements.
Credit: Ali Hajimiri/Caltech

New Camera Chip Provides Superfine 3-D Resolution

3-D printing can produce a wide array of objects in relatively little time, but first the printer needs to have a blueprint of what to print. The blueprints are provided by 3-D cameras, which scan objects and create models for the printer. Caltech researchers have now developed a 3-D camera that produces the highest depth-measurement accuracy of any similar device, allowing it to deliver replicas of an object to be 3-D printed within microns of similarity to the original object. In addition, the camera, known as a nanophotonic coherent imager, is inexpensive and small.
Credit: Image provided courtesy of Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis; artwork by Darius Siwek.

One Step Closer to Artificial Photosynthesis and 'Solar Fuels'

Plants are masters of photosynthesis—the process of turning carbon dioxide, sunlight, and water into oxygen and sugar. Inspired by this natural and energy-efficient process, Caltech researchers have created an "artificial leaf" that takes in CO2, sunlight, and water to produce hydrogen fuels. This solar-powered system, one researcher says, shatters all of the combined safety, performance, and stability records for artificial leaf technology by factors of 5 to 10 or more.
Credit: Santiago Lombeyda and Robin Betz

Potassium Salt Outperforms Precious Metals As a Catalyst

Rare precious metals have been the standard catalyst for the formation of carbon-silicon bonds, a process crucial to the synthesis of a host of products from new medicines to advanced materials. However, they are expensive, inefficient, and produce toxic waste byproducts. This February, Caltech researchers discovered a much more sustainable catalyst in the form of a simple potassium salt that is one of the most abundant metals on Earth and thousands of times less expensive than other commonly used catalysts. In addition, the potassium salt is much more effective at running challenging chemical reactions than state-of-the-art precious metal complexes.
Credit: Qi Zhao/National University of Singapore

Probing the Mysterious Perceptual World of Autism

The way in which people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) perceive the world is unique. It has been a long-standing belief that people with ASD often miss facial cues, contributing to impaired social interaction. In a study published in October, Caltech researchers showed 700 images to 39 subjects and found that people with ASD pay closer attention to simple edges and patterns in images than to the faces of people. The study also found that subjects were strongly attracted to the center of images—regardless of what was placed there—and to differences in color and contrast rather than facial features. These findings may help doctors diagnose and more effectively treat the different forms of autism.
Body: 

The year 2015 proved to be another groundbreaking year for research at Caltech. From seeing quantum motion, to reconfiguring jellyfish limbs, to measuring stellar magnetic fields, researchers continued to ask and answer the deepest scientific questions.

In case you missed any of them, here are 15 stories highlighting a few of the discoveries, methods, and technologies that came to life at Caltech in 2015.

Written by Lori Dajose

Exclude from News Hub: 
Yes

Unlocking the Chemistry of Life

In just the span of an average lifetime, science has made leaps and bounds in our understanding of the human genome and its role in heredity and health—from the first insights about DNA structure in the 1950s to the rapid, inexpensive sequencing technologies of today. However, the 20,000 genes of the human genome are more than DNA; they also encode proteins to carry out the countless functions that are key to our existence. And we know much less about how this collection of proteins supports the essential functions of life.

In order to understand the role each of these proteins plays in human health—and what goes wrong when disease occurs—biologists need to figure out what these proteins are and how they function. Several decades ago, biologists realized that to answer these questions on the scale of the thousands of proteins in the human body, they would have to leave the comfort of their own discipline to get some help from a standard analytical-chemistry technique: mass spectrometry. Since 2006, Caltech's Proteome Exploration Laboratory (PEL) has been building on this approach to bridge the gap between biology and chemistry, in the process unlocking important insights about how the human body works.

Scientists can easily sequence an entire genome in just a day or two, but sequencing a proteome—all of the proteins encoded by a genome—is a much greater challenge says Ray Deshaies, protein biologist and founder of the PEL. "One challenge is the amount of protein. If you want to sequence a person's DNA from a few of their cheek cells, you first amplify—or make copies of—the DNA so that you'll have a lot of it to analyze. However, there is no such thing as protein amplification," Deshaies says. "The number of protein molecules in the cells that you have is the number that you have, so you must use a very sensitive technique to identify those very few molecules."

The best means available for doing this today is called shotgun mass spectrometry, Deshaies says. In general, mass spectrometry allows researchers to identify the amount and types of molecules that are present in a biological sample by separating and analyzing the molecules as gas ions, based on mass and charge; shotgun mass spectrometry—a combination of several techniques—applies this separation process specifically to digested, broken-down proteins, allowing researchers to identify the types and amounts of proteins that are present in a heterogeneous mixture.

"Up until this technique was invented, people had to take a mixture of proteins, run a current through a polyacrylamide gel to separate the proteins by size, stain the proteins, and then physically cut the stained bands out of the gel to have each individual protein species sequenced," says Deshaies. "But mass spectrometry technology has gotten so good that we can now cast a broader net by sequencing everything, then use data analysis to figure out what specific information is of interest after the dust settles down."

For more about the PEL, visit E&S+.

Home Page Title: 
Unlocking the Chemistry of Life
Writer: 
Exclude from News Hub: 
No
News Type: 
Research News
Exclude from Home Page: 
Home Page Summary: 
Caltech has an advantage in the quest to decipher details of the human proteome—the proteins encoded by the human genome.

Two Caltech Faculty Inducted into the AAAS

Erik Winfree (PhD '98) and Jay R. Winkler (PhD '84) have been elected as Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Winfree, a professor of computer science, computation and neural systems, and bioengineering, was recognized by the AAAS for his "foundational contributions to biomolecular computing and molecular programming." Winkler is a faculty associate and lecturer in chemistry in the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, as well as the director of the Beckman Institute Laser Resource Center. He was elected for "distinguished contributions to the field of electron transfer chemistry and the development of its applications in biology, materials science, and solar energy."

Winfree's research with biological computing aims to "coax DNA into performing algorithmic tricks," he says. An algorithm is a collection of mechanistic rules—information—that directs the creation and organization of structure and behavior. In biology, information in DNA can be likened to an algorithm: it encodes instructions for biochemical networks, body plans, and brain architectures, and thus produces complex life. The Winfree group is developing molecular engineering methods that exploit the same principles as those used by biology: they study theoretical models of computation based on realistic molecular biochemistry, write software for molecular system design and analysis, and experimentally synthesize promising systems in the laboratory using DNA nanotechnology.

"We are seeking to create a kind of molecular programming language: a set of elementary components and methods for combining them into complex systems that involve self-assembled structures and dynamical behaviors," Winfree says. "DNA is capable of and can be rationally designed to perform a wide variety of tasks. We want to know if DNA is a sufficient building block for constructing arbitrarily complex and sophisticated molecular machines."

Winfree became an assistant professor at Caltech in 2000, an associate professor in 2006, and was named full professor in 2010. He was also named a MacArthur Fellow in 2000.

Winkler works on developing new methods for using laser spectroscopy to study chemical kinetics and the intermediate molecules that form during chemical reactions. In particular, his work involves experimental investigations of the factors that affect the rates of long-range electron-tunneling processes—the processes by which electrons are transported between atoms and molecules.

"Electron transfer reactions are fundamental processes in many chemical transformations, including electrochemical catalysis, solar energy conversion, and biological energy transduction," Winkler says. "In the Beckman Institute Laser Center, we have spent the past 25 years studying electron transfer reactions in small inorganic molecules and in metalloproteins"—proteins that contain metal atoms. "Our studies are aimed at experimentally elucidating the molecular factors that regulate the speed and efficiency of electron flow.

"I have been fortunate to work on these projects with many dedicated and talented students and postdoctoral scholars at Caltech. It is extremely gratifying to have this work recognized by the AAAS," he adds.

Following postdoctoral work at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Winkler returned to Caltech as a Member of the Beckman Institute in 1990. He was first appointed as a lecturer in chemistry in 2002, and later a faculty associate in chemistry in 2008.

In addition to Winkler and Winfree, eight other Caltech alumni were named as AAAS Fellows: Edmund W. Bertschinger (BS '79), J. Edward Russo (BS '63), Mitchell Kronenberg (PhD '83), Donald P. Gaver III (BS '82), James W. Demmel II (BS '75), Jacqueline E. Dixon (PhD '92), Brian K. Lamb (PhD '78), and Shelly Sakiyama-Elbert (MS '98, PhD '00).

The AAAS is the world's largest general scientific society. This year, the AAAS awarded the distinction of Fellow to 347 of its members. New Fellows will be honored during the 2016 AAAS Annual Meeting in February.

Writer: 
Lori Dajose
Home Page Title: 
Two Caltech Faculty Inducted into the AAAS
Writer: 
Exclude from News Hub: 
No
News Type: 
In Our Community
Teaser Image: 
Exclude from Home Page: 

Tricking an Enzyme Into Making Better Insulin

Mary Boyajian, a junior majoring in chemical engineering at Caltech, spent her summer as a student in the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) program trying to trick an enzyme. The enzyme, tRNA synthetase, has a very specific chemical target, and Boyajian wanted the enzyme to ease up a bit on its requirements so that it might also find acceptable a slightly altered version of the target. The work might sound esoteric, but it was Boyajian's piece of a project with an end goal that could benefit millions: devising a faster-acting insulin-replacement therapy for the treatment of diabetes.

A normally functioning pancreas keeps blood sugar within a narrow range by releasing large bursts of the hormone insulin after meals. Insulin helps cells absorb excess glucose and prevents the liver from producing additional sugar. In the case of diabetics, however, either the cells become resistant to the effects of insulin or the body simply cannot produce enough of the hormone, so additional insulin is needed.

In the 1920s, insulin isolated from animals became the first insulin-replacement therapy for diabetics. Forty years later, scientists figured out how to make human insulin in the lab. However, that synthetic insulin behaves a bit differently in the body. For example, it tends to clump up and therefore takes a long time for the body to absorb.

To improve the speed or ease of absorption, chemists have designed replacement therapies that are analogs of human insulin, made by substituting some of insulin's building blocks, or amino acids, with other naturally occurring amino acids. However, there is room for improvement. For example, scientists would like to make therapies that kick in faster, last longer, and offer a longer shelf life.

In all current insulin-replacement therapies, certain naturally occurring amino acids are swapped for other naturally occurring amino acids. But in the lab of David Tirrell, the Ross McCollum–William H. Corcoran Professor and professor of chemistry and chemical engineering at Caltech, chemists are working with what are known as noncanonical amino acids. These variants are designed and made in the lab to have slightly altered chemical structures. If expressed in a protein, these synthetic amino acids can introduce entirely new functions or capabilities. Tirrell's group has the idea to swap out a naturally occurring amino acid from insulin with a noncanonical amino acid to create a replacement therapy that would outperform those on the market today.

Boyajian's role this summer was to introduce specific mutations in the enzyme tRNA synthetase. Each of the 20 amino acids that are expressed naturally in proteins has its own tRNA synthetase that hunts within cells for its specific amino acid target, so that the amino acid can be incorporated in the right sequence to make proteins. Even a small difference in an amino acid's structure will deter its tRNA synthetase.

"When I started this project, I had no idea that changing one amino acid could change so much about a protein, but it can," says Boyajian. "My job is to mutate the tRNA synthetase so that it won't see a modified amino acid—one of our noncanonical amino acids—and say, 'That's the wrong one. Take it out.'"

To get an idea of how she might mutate the enzyme, Boyajian studied the known structures of similar tRNA synthetases and how they interact with their target molecules.

Once she had an idea for a mutation, she introduced the changes into the gene that codes for the tRNA synthetase. Then she used a standard technique in molecular biology called polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to make many copies of it. Next she grew cells with the mutated enzymes on media lacking the naturally occurring amino acid—think of it as a type of food for cells. Once the cells ate up any small traces of the amino acid in the media, she fed them one of the noncanonical amino acids. If a mutated enzyme worked, it was able to "eat" the new amino acids; if not, the cells eventually died.

At the end of the summer, one of Boyajian's mutated tRNA synthetases showed promising results in terms of incorporating one of the noncanonical amino acids, and she is now working to scale-up the size of cultures to determine whether the new enzyme can be used to produce proteins for future experiments. In the long term, if the enzyme is found to efficiently incorporate a specific noncanonical amino acid, the Tirrell lab would use the enzyme to produce novel insulins that could be assessed as potential biopharmaceuticals to improve the quality of life for patients.

Boyajian, who also plays basketball and serves as one of the captains of the water polo team, says she learned a lot from her SURF experience. "My grad student mentors, Seth Lieblich and Kat Fang, were great, and everybody in the lab was very welcoming," she says. "It's really nice to see everything you learned in the classroom being applied."

Writer: 
Kimm Fesenmaier
Home Page Title: 
SURF: Working to Make a Better Insulin
Writer: 
Exclude from News Hub: 
No
News Type: 
In Our Community
Exclude from Home Page: 
Home Page Summary: 
Junior Mary Boyajian spent her summer working on a project that aims to devise a faster-acting insulin-replacement therapy for the treatment of diabetes.

Three's Not a Crowd

The public high school in Blue Springs, Missouri, just outside Kansas City, graduates more than 500 seniors each year. Remarkably, the valedictorian in 2015 was the younger sister of the valedictorian in 2014—who was the younger sister of the valedictorian in 2013.

And all three are now Caltech undergraduates.

These are the Butkovich sisters: junior Slava and sophomore Nina, both majoring in chemical engineering, and freshman Lazarina ("Laza"), currently deciding between chemical engineering and chemistry.

"In the nearly half-century since Caltech began admitting women to its undergraduate program, 2015 is almost certainly the first year we've had three sisters enrolled in three different graduating classes at the same time," notes Barbara Green, interim dean of undergraduate students." The sisters represent "a three-peat," says Caltech admissions director Jarrid Whitney, not a package deal. "All our applicants are reviewed independently and without regard to siblings, parents, or other legacies. For three family members to receive consecutive offers of admission indicates how tremendously talented all three of them must be."

For their part, Slava, Nina, and Laza find their own nearly identical trajectories unsurprising. "We were taught at a young age that science majors can do a lot of good for society," Slava explains. "Anyway," adds Nina, "science is more objective than other things, like English and law. It has right answers."

Instead, they give much of the credit for nurturing their talents to their father, who is a lawyer, and their mother, a chemical engineer. They also single out recently retired Blue Springs High chemistry teacher Evan Manuel. "He's the above-and-beyond teacher," says Nina. "His passion for the sciences inspires his students."

Manuel praises the sisters for having "high expectations—not just of themselves but of others around them. I'm sure it's because of how they were brought up. And they've generously shared that perspective with their peers."

For example, the three young women, whose own heritage is Slavic and Filipino, cofounded their school's Association for Cultural and Ethnic Diversity and hosted its monthly world culture celebrations. That willingness to serve, says Manuel, earned them the respect of their peers. "And it's not a far-removed, no-interaction, pedestal kind of respect," he adds. "They like helping people, so people like them. Their college recommendation letters were some of the easiest I've ever been asked to write."

Even before landing in Pasadena, they had already completed summer research projects in university chemistry labs: Slava at Baylor and Missouri S&T, her sisters at the University of Iowa. They also tutored classmates in a variety of subjects in between sitting for a combined total of almost four dozen AP exams, many in subjects not even offered by their school.

At Caltech, all three Butkoviches will be pursuing summer research opportunities. Slava, who is planning a career in anti-cancer research, was named a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) fellow last year. They are active in the undergraduate house system (Nina is a member of Ruddock House; Laza and Slava are members of Dabney) and have taken part in yoga, tennis, tai chi, karate, and the NERF club. Their course loads are challenging, but none are carrying an overload. "I don't think extreme units is smart," Nina says.

In fact, according to all three, one of the biggest challenges since leaving high school has been learning to rely on something they had honestly never needed before now: study groups.

Home Page Title: 
Three's Not a Crowd
Writer: 
Exclude from News Hub: 
No
News Type: 
In Our Community
Exclude from Home Page: 
Home Page Summary: 
The Butkovich sisters—junior Slava, sophomore Nina, and freshman Lazarina—find their own nearly identical trajectories unsurprising.

When Harry Met Arnold

A Milestone in Chemistry

On November 12 and 13, the Beckman Institute at Caltech hosted a symposium on "The Shared Legacy of Arnold Beckman and Harry Gray." The two began a close working relationship in the late 1960s, when Gray arrived at Caltech. In this interview, Gray provides some background.

How did you come to Caltech?

I grew up in southern Kentucky. I got my BS in chemistry in 1957, and my professors told me to go to grad school at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, to continue my studies in synthetic organic chemistry. They didn't give me a choice. Western Kentucky College had physical chemistry, analytical chemistry, organic chemistry, and that was it.

When I got to Northwestern I met Fred Basolo, who became my mentor. He did inorganic chemistry, which I was very surprised to discover even existed as a research field. I was so excited by his work, which was studying the mechanisms of inorganic reactions, that I decided to switch fields and do what he did. I got my PhD in 1960 from work on the syntheses and reaction mechanisms of platinum, rhodium, palladium, and nickel complexes. A complex has a metal atom sitting in the middle of as many as six ions or molecules called ligands. The metal has empty orbitals that it wants to fill with paired-up electrons, and the ligands have electron pairs they aren't using, so the metal and its ligands form stable bonds.

I had gotten into chemistry in the first place because I'd always been interested in colors. Even when I was a little kid, colors fascinated me. I really wanted to understand them, and many complexes have brilliant, beautiful colors. At Northwestern I heard about crystal-field theory, which was the first attempt to explain how metal complexes got their colors. All the crystal-field theory's big shots were in Copenhagen, so I decided to go there as a postdoc. Which I did.

I soon found out that crystal-field theory didn't go far enough. It only explained the colors of a limited set of metal ions in solution, and it couldn't explain charge transfers and a lot of other things. All the atoms were treated as point charges, with no provision for the bonds between the metal and the ligands. There weren't any bonds. So I helped develop a new theory, called ligand-field theory, which put the bonds back in the complexes. Carl Ballhausen, a professor at the University of Copenhagen, and I wrote a paper on a "metal-oxo" complex in which an oxygen atom was triple-bonded to a vanadium ion. The triple bond in our theory was required to account for the blue color of the vanadium-oxo complex. We also could explain charge transfers in other oxo complexes. Bonds were back in metal complexes!

Metal-oxo bonds are very important in biology. They are crucial in a lot of reactions, such as the oxygen-producing side of photosynthesis; the metabolism of drugs by cytochrome P-450, which often leads to toxic interactions with other drugs; and respiration. When we breathe in O2, our respiratory system splits the O=O bond, forming a metal-oxo complex as a reactive intermediate on the way to the product, which is water.

My work on bonding in metal oxo complexes got me a job as an assistant professor at Columbia University in 1961. By '65 I was a full professor and getting offers from many places, including Caltech. I loved Columbia, and I would have stayed there, but the chemistry department was very small. I knew it would be hard to build inorganic chemistry in a small department that concentrated on organic and physical chemistry.

There weren't any inorganic chemists at Caltech, either, but division chair Jack Roberts encouraged me to build the field up to five or six faculty members. I came to Caltech in 1966, and we now have a very strong inorganic chemistry group.

When I got here, I started work in two new areas at the interface of inorganic chemistry and biology. I'm best known for my work showing how electrons flow through proteins in respiration and photosynthesis. I won the Wolf Prize and the Welch Prize and the National Medal of Science for this work.

I also got into inorganic photochemistry—solar-energy research. That work started well before the first energy crisis in 1973, and continued until oil became cheap again in the early 1980s and solar-energy research was no longer supported. In the late '90s, I restarted the work. Now I'm leading an NSF Center for Chemical Innovation in Solar Fuels, which has an outreach activity I proudly call the Solar Army.

And how's that going?

The Solar Army keeps growing. We now have at least 60 brigades at high schools across the U.S., and 10 more abroad. I'd say that about 1,000 students have been through the program since 2008. We're getting young scientists involved in research that could have a profound effect on the world they're going to inherit. They're helping us look for light absorbers and catalysts to turn water into hydrogen fuel, using nothing but sunlight. The solar materials need to be sturdy metal oxides that are abundant and dirt cheap. But there are many metals in the periodic table. When you start combining them in twos and threes in varying amounts, there are literally millions of possibilities to be tested. We already have found several very good water oxidation and reduction catalysts, and since the National Science Foundation has just renewed our CCI Solar Fuels grant, we expect to make great progress in the coming years in understanding how they work.

Let's shift gears and talk about the Beckman Institute. How did you first meet Arnold Beckman [PhD '28, inventor of the pH meter, founder of Beckman Instruments, and a Life Trustee of Caltech]?

I gave a talk back in 1967, probably on Alumni Day. Arnold was the chair of Caltech's Board of Trustees at the time, and he and his wife, Mabel, were seated in the second row. When the talk was over, they came down and introduced themselves. Mabel said—and I remember this very well—she said, "Arnold, I didn't understand much of what this young man said, but I really liked the way he said it." Arnold gave me the thumbs up, and that started our relationship.

When I became chairman of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering in 1978, I asked him to be on my advisory committee. I didn't ask him for money, but I asked him for advice, and we became quite close. He said he wanted to do something for us. That led to his gift for the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Laboratory of Chemical Synthesis, as well as a gift for instrumentation.

He liked it that we raised money to match his instrument gift. He told me that he wanted to do something bigger, so we started thinking about building the Beckman Institute. [Caltech President] Murph Goldberger and I would go down to Orange County about every week with a new plan. He rejected the first four or five until we came up with the idea of developing technology to support chemistry and biology—methods and instruments for fundamental research—and creating resource centers to house them.

Once we agreed on what the building should house, we started planning the building itself. But when we showed Arnold our design, which was four stories plus a basement, he said, "That's not big enough. You need another floor for growth." So we added a subbasement that was quickly occupied by a resource center for magnetic-resonance imaging and optical imaging that has been heavily used by biologists, chemists, and other investigators.

The Beckman Institute has done a lot over the last 25 years. But it develops technology for general research use, so it doesn't often make the headlines itself. Are you OK with that?

Many advances in science and technology have been made in the Beckman Institute over the last 25 years. The methods and instruments that have been developed in BI resource centers have made enormous impacts at the frontiers of chemistry and biology. Solar-fuels science and human biology are just two examples of areas where work in the Beckman Institute has made a big difference. And there are many more. Am I proud? You bet I am!

Writer: 
Douglas Smith
Home Page Title: 
When Harry Met Arnold
Listing Title: 
When Harry Met Arnold
Writer: 
Exclude from News Hub: 
No
Short Title: 
When Harry Met Arnold
News Type: 
In Our Community
Exclude from Home Page: 
Home Page Summary: 
Caltech celebrates the 25th year of the Beckman Institute and the 80th birthday of Harry Gray, the Beckman Professor of Chemistry and the founding director of the institute.
Monday, November 30, 2015

Microbial diners, drive-ins, and dives: deep-sea edition

Pages