Caltech Researchers Achieve First Electrowetting of Carbon Nanotubes

If you can imagine the straw in your soda can being a million times smaller and made of carbon, you pretty much have a mental picture of a carbon nanotube. Scientists have been making them at will for years, but have never gotten the nanotubes to suck up liquid metal to form tiny wires. In fact, conventional wisdom and hundreds of refereed papers say that such is not even possible.

Researchers uncover new details about how signals are transmitted in the brain

An international team of scientists has announced a new breakthrough in understanding the molecular details of how signals move around in the human brain. The work is basic research, but could help pharmacologists design new drugs for treating a host of neurological disorders, as well as drugs for reducing alcohol and nicotine craving.

Caltech Chemist Robert Grubbs Wins Nobel Prize

Robert Grubbs, an organic chemist whose work on catalysis has led to a wide variety of applications in medicine and industry, has won the 2005 Nobel Prize in chemistry. The announcement was made this morning by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm.

Scientists Uncover Rules that Govern the Rate of Protein Evolution

Humans and insects and pond scum-and all other living things on Earth-are constantly evolving. The tiny proteins these living things are built from are also evolving, accumulating mutations mostly one at a time over billions of years. But for reasons that hitherto have been a mystery, some proteins evolve quickly, while others take their sweet time-even when they reside in the same organism.

Caltech, MIT Chemists Look for Better Waysto Use Chemical Bonds to Store Solar Energy

With gasoline prices hovering at $3 per gallon, probably few Americans need convincing that another energy crisis is imminent. But what precisely is to be done about our future energy needs is still a puzzle. There's talk about a "hydrogen economy," but hydrogen itself poses some formidable challenges.

All-Female Chemical Engineering Graduating Class at Caltech This Year

"I am not a novelty. . . It is not amazing that girls are engineers-it's normal," says Victoria Loewer, a member of the class of 2005 at the California Institute of Technology. Loewer is referring to the fact that she is a member of the first all-female chemical engineering graduating class at Caltech, a significant milestone in the history of the Institute.

Caltech Chemical Biologist SpecializingIn Brain Chemistry Named HHMI Investigator

California Institute of Technology chemical biologist Linda Hsieh-Wilson has been named one of this year's new Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators. Hsieh-Wilson's research integrates chemistry and neurobiology to understand how the cells of the brain communicate with one another.

Toward a Longer, Healthier Life

In two separate awards from the Ellison Medical Foundation, two scientists from the California Institute of Technology are taking a much more scholarly approach to the ravages of aging. Harry Gray, a chemist, has been awarded $970,000 to reveal the structure of a protein and a peptide that underlie two age-related diseases, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, while biologist Alexander Varshavsky has been awarded $972,000 to conduct a systematic investigation of the genetics and biochemistry of aging.

Systems Biology Could Augur New Age for Predictive and Preventive Medicine

Writing in the current issue of the journal Science, Institute for Systems Biology immunologist and technologist Leroy Hood and California Institute of Technology chemist Jim Heath and their colleagues explain how a new approach to the way that biological information is gathered and processed could soon lead to breakthroughs in the prevention and early treatment of a number of diseases.

Chemists at Caltech devise new, simpler wayto make carbohydrates

Chemists at the California Institute of Technology have succeeded in devising a new method for building carbohydrate molecules in a simple and straightforward way that requires very few steps. The new synthesis strategy should be of benefit to scientists in the areas of chemistry and biology and in the pharmaceutical industry.

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