Energy-Efficient Refrigeration from Ultranarrow Silicon Wires

Supernarrow silicon wires, or silicon nanowires, are laying the foundation for a new type of cheap yet energy-efficient microscopic refrigeration, with no moving parts, report researchers from the California Institute of Technology in a study published today in the journal Nature.

Caltech Chemist Peter Dervan Wins National Medal of Science

Peter B. Dervan, the Bren Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology, has been named one of eight recipients of the 2006 National Medal of Science. The award was announced Monday, July 16, by the White House.

Ralph M. Parsons Foundation Awards $1 Million Grant to Caltech for New Research Laboratory

The Ralph M. Parsons Foundation has pledged $1 million to the California Institute of Technology toward construction of a new building for chemistry and chemical engineering positioned to be the centerpiece of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering's plan for the future.

Researchers Announce New Discovery about Polymers; Could Lead to Better Plastics

In the late 1960s, the memorable advice given to a certain graduate of movie fame was to go into plastics. Forty years later, Caltech chemical engineering professor Julia Kornfield would like to add the word "shish-kebabs."

Moore Funds Center to Facilitate Chemical Discovery

Facilities to automate the work of experimental chemistry may soon accelerate the process of chemical discovery at the California Institute of Technology, thanks to a grant of over $11 million from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Caltech and UCLA Researchers Create Memory Circuit the Size of a Human White Blood Cell

Don't throw away your laptop yet, but there's a promising new high-tech invention being announced this week. Researchers have created a memory circuit the size of a white blood cell that has enough capacity to store the Declaration of Independence and have space left over. With 160 kilobits of capacity, it's the densest memory circuit ever fabricated.

Researchers Improve Understanding of Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes With New Computer Simulation

Carbon nanotubes are tiny garden-hose-like hollow tubes that have considerable promise for future applications such as nano-sized plumbing and nanolithography, and for the creation of numerous tiny devices such as mass sensors and actuators. Such applications require improved understanding of the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes. Previous studies pointed out that carbon nanotubes behave like macroscopic elastic hoses similar to garden hoses made of rubber.

Chemist Nelson J. Leonard Dies

Nelson J. Leonard, one of the most important chemists of the 20th century, died Monday, October 9, at his home in Pasadena, California. He was 90.

Caltech Chemist Jacqueline Barton Receives Gibbs Medal from American Chemical Society

Jacqueline Barton, the Arthur and Marian Hanisch Memorial Professor and professor of chemistry at the California Institute of Technology, has been named the 2006 recipient of the Willard Gibbs Award. The honor was bestowed on Barton at a special award dinner hosted by the Chicago section of the American Chemical Society on May 12 in Des Plaines, Illinois.

Caltech Researchers Create New Proteins by Recombining the Pieces of Existing Proteins

An ongoing challenge in biochemistry is getting a handle on protein folding-that is, the way that DNA sequences determine the unique structure and functions of proteins, which then act as "biology's workhorses." Gaining mastery over the construction of proteins will someday lead to breakthroughs in medicine and pharmaceuticals.

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