Friday, October 4, 2013

Undergraduate Teaching Assistant Orientation

A Home for the Microbiome

The human body is full of tiny microorganisms—hundreds to thousands of species of bacteria collectively called the microbiome, which are believed to contribute to a healthy existence. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract—and the colon in particular—is home to the largest concentration and highest diversity of bacterial species. But how do these organisms persist and thrive in a system that is constantly in flux due to foods and fluids moving through it? A team led by California Institute of Technology (Caltech) biologist Sarkis Mazmanian believes it has found the answer, at least in one common group of bacteria: a set of genes that promotes stable microbial colonization of the gut.

Arnold Appointed New Director of Rosen Bioengineering Center

The Rosen Center supports bioengineering research through the funding of fellows and faculty from many disciplines, including applied physics, chemical engineering, synthetic biology, and computer science.

A Secret to Making Macrophages

Biologists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have worked out the details of a mechanism that leads undifferentiated blood stem cells to become macrophages—immune cells that attack bacteria and other foreign pathogens.
Thursday, September 26, 2013
Ramo Auditorium

Graduate TA Orientation & Teaching Conference

New Research Sheds Light on M.O. of Unusual RNA Molecules

A team of researchers led by newly arrived Caltech biologist Mitchell Guttman and Kathrin Plath of UCLA, has figured out how some RNA molecules take advantage of their position within the 3-D structure of genomic material to home in on targets.

Caltech Seniors Receive Fulbright Fellowships

Three graduating Caltech seniors, Alex Wang, Joy Xie, and Philip Kong, have been selected to receive 2013–2014 Fulbright scholarships to pursue graduate studies abroad.

Beauty and the Brain: Electrical Stimulation of the Brain Makes You Perceive Faces as More Attractive

Researchers, led by scientists at Caltech, have used a well-known, noninvasive technique to electrically stimulate a specific region deep inside the brain, causing volunteers to judge faces as more attractive than before their brains were stimulated.

Keeping Stem Cells Strong

A team of researchers led by biologists at Caltech has found that, in mouse models, the molecule microRNA-146a (miR-146a) acts as a critical regulator and protector of blood-forming stem cells during chronic inflammation, suggesting that a deficiency of miR-146a may be one important cause of blood cancers and bone marrow failure.

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