Monday, April 7, 2014
Center for Student Services 360 (Workshop Space)

Planning Session for the Fall 2014 Teaching Conference

Wednesday, April 23, 2014
Beckman Institute Auditorium

The Art of Scientific Presentations

Wednesday, April 2, 2014
Beckman Institute Auditorium

Juggling Teaching at a Community College and Research at Caltech

A Changing View of Bone Marrow Cells

Caltech researchers show that the cells are actively involved in sensing infection

In the battle against infection, immune cells are the body's offense and defense—some cells go on the attack while others block invading pathogens. It has long been known that a population of blood stem cells that resides in the bone marrow generates all of these immune cells. But most scientists have believed that blood stem cells participate in battles against infection in a delayed way, replenishing immune cells on the front line only after they become depleted.

Now, using a novel microfluidic technique, researchers at Caltech have shown that these stem cells might be more actively involved, sensing danger signals directly and quickly producing new immune cells to join the fight.

"It has been most people's belief that the bone marrow has the function of making these cells but that the response to infection is something that happens locally, at the infection site," says David Baltimore, president emeritus and the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology at Caltech. "We've shown that these bone marrow cells themselves are sensitive to infection-related molecules and that they respond very rapidly. So the bone marrow is actually set up to respond to infection."

The study, led by Jimmy Zhao, a graduate student in the UCLA-Caltech Medical Scientist Training Program, will appear in the April 3 issue of the journal Cell Stem Cell.

In the work, the researchers show that blood stem cells have all the components needed to detect an invasion and to mount an inflammatory response. They show, as others have previously, that these cells have on their surface a type of receptor called a toll-like receptor. The researchers then identify an entire internal response pathway that can translate activation of those receptors by infection-related molecules, or danger signals, into the production of cytokines, signaling molecules that can crank up immune-cell production. Interestingly, they show for the first time that the transcription factor NF-κB, known to be the central organizer of the immune response to infection, is part of that response pathway.

To examine what happens to a blood stem cell once it is activated by a danger signal, the Baltimore lab teamed up with chemists from the lab of James Heath, the Elizabeth W. Gilloon Professor and professor of chemistry at Caltech. They devised a microfluidic chip—printed in flexible silicon on a glass slide, complete with input and output ports, control valves, and thousands of tiny wells—that would enable single-cell analysis. At the bottom of each well, they attached DNA molecules in strips and introduced a flow of antibodies—pathogen-targeting proteins of the immune system—that had complementary DNA. They then added the stem cells along with infection-related molecules and incubated the whole sample. Since the antibodies were selected based on their ability to bind to certain cytokines, they specifically captured any of those cytokines released by the cells after activation. When the researchers added a secondary antibody and a dye, the cytokines lit up. "They all light up the same color, but you can tell which is which because you've attached the DNA in an orderly fashion," explains Baltimore. "So you've got both visualization and localization that tells you which molecule was secreted." In this way, they were able to measure, for example, that the cytokine IL-6 was secreted most frequently—by 21.9 percent of the cells tested.

"The experimental challenges here were significant—we needed to isolate what are actually quite rare cells, and then measure the levels of a dozen secreted proteins from each of those cells," says Heath. "The end result was sort of like putting on a new pair of glasses—we were able to observe functional properties of these stem cells that were totally unexpected."

The team found that blood stem cells produce a surprising number and variety of cytokines very rapidly. In fact, the stem cells are even more potent generators of cytokines than other previously known cytokine producers of the immune system. Once the cytokines are released, it appears that they are able to bind to their own cytokine receptors or those on other nearby blood stem cells. This stimulates the bound cells to differentiate into the immune cells needed at the site of infection.

"This does now change the view of the potential of bone marrow cells to be involved in inflammatory reactions," says Baltimore.

Heath notes that the collaboration benefited greatly from Caltech's support of interdisciplinary work. "It is a unique and fertile environment," he says, "one that encourages scientists from different disciplines to harness their disparate areas of expertise to solve tough problems like this one."

Additional coauthors on the paper, "Conversion of danger signals into cytokine signals by hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for regulation of stress-induced hematopoiesis," are Chao Ma, Ryan O'Connell, Arnav Mehta, and Race DiLoreto. The work was supported by grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institutes of Health, a National Research Service Award, the UCLA-Caltech Medical Scientist Training Program, a Rosen Fellowship, a Pathway to Independence Award, and an American Cancer Society Research Grant.

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Kimm Fesenmaier
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Friday, March 14, 2014
Avery Dining Hall

Workshop: Comedy as a Teaching Tool

Caltech's "Secrets" to Success

Everyone who really knows Caltech understands that it is unique among universities around the world. But just what makes Caltech so special? We've asked that question before, and the numbers don't tell the full story. So, is it our focus? Our culture? Our people?

The UK's Times Higher Education magazine recently tackled the topic, asking more specifically, "How does a tiny institution create such an outsized impact?" Caltech faculty share their perspectives in the cover story of the magazine's latest issue.

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In Our Community

Caltech-Developed Method for Delivering HIV-Fighting Antibodies Proven Even More Promising

In 2011, biologists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) demonstrated a highly effective method for delivering HIV-fighting antibodies to mice—a treatment that protected the mice from infection by a laboratory strain of HIV delivered intravenously. Now the researchers, led by Nobel Laureate David Baltimore, have shown that the same procedure is just as effective against a strain of HIV found in the real world, even when transmitted across mucosal surfaces.

The findings, which appear in the February 9 advance online publication of the journal Nature Medicine, suggest that the delivery method might be effective in preventing vaginal transmission of HIV between humans.

"The method that we developed has now been validated in the most natural possible setting in a mouse," says Baltimore, president emeritus and the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology at Caltech. "This procedure is extremely effective against a naturally transmitted strain and by an intravaginal infection route, which is a model of how HIV is transmitted in most of the infections that occur in the world."

The new delivery method—called Vectored ImmunoProphylaxis, or VIP for short—is not exactly a vaccine. Vaccines introduce substances such as antigens into the body to try to get the immune system to mount an appropriate attack—to generate antibodies that can block an infection or T cells that can attack infected cells. In the case of VIP, a small, harmless virus is injected and delivers genes to the muscle tissue, instructing it to generate specific antibodies.  

The researchers emphasize that the work was done in mice and that the leap from mice to humans is large. The team is now working with the Vaccine Research Center at the National Institutes of Health to begin clinical evaluation.

The study, "Vectored immunoprophylaxis protects humanized mice from mucosal HIV transmission," was supported by the UCLA Center for AIDS Research, the National Institutes of Health, and the Caltech-UCLA Joint Center for Translational Medicine. Caltech biology researchers Alejandro B. Balazs, Yong Ouyang, Christin H. Hong, Joyce Chen, and Steven M. Nguyen also contributed to the study, as well as Dinesh S. Rao of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and Dong Sung An of the UCLA AIDS Institute.

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Kimm Fesenmaier
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A Detailed Look at HIV in Action

Researchers gain a better understanding of the virus through electron microscopy

The human intestinal tract, or gut, is best known for its role in digestion. But this collection of organs also plays a prominent role in the immune system. In fact, it is one of the first parts of the body that is attacked in the early stages of an HIV infection. Knowing how the virus infects cells and accumulates in this area is critical to developing new therapies for the over 33 million people worldwide living with HIV. Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) are the first to have utilized high-resolution electron microscopy to look at HIV infection within the actual tissue of an infected organism, providing perhaps the most detailed characterization yet of HIV infection in the gut.

The team's findings are described in the January 30 issue of PLOS Pathogens.

"Looking at a real infection within real tissue is a big advance," says Mark Ladinsky, an electron microscope scientist at Caltech and lead author of the paper. "With something like HIV, it's usually very difficult and dangerous to do because the virus is an infectious agent. We used an animal model implanted with human tissue so we can study the actual virus under, essentially, its normal circumstances."

Ladinsky worked with Pamela Bjorkman, Max Delbrück Professor of Biology at Caltech, to take three-dimensional images of normal cells along with HIV-infected tissues from the gut of a mouse model engineered to have a human immune system. The team used a technique called electron tomography, in which a tissue sample is embedded in plastic and placed under a high-powered microscope. Then the sample is tilted incrementally through a course of 120 degrees, and pictures are taken of it at one-degree intervals. All of the images are then very carefully aligned with one another and, through a process called back projection, turned into a 3-D reconstruction that allows different places within the volume to be viewed one pixel at a time.

"Most prior electron microscopy studies of HIV have focused on the virus itself or on infection of laboratory-grown cell cultures," says Bjorkman, who is also an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. "Ours is the first major electron microscopy study to look at HIV interacting with other cells in the actual gut tissue of an infected animal model."

By procuring such detailed images, Ladinsky and Bjorkman were able to confirm several observations of HIV made in prior, in vitro studies, including the structure and behavior of the virus as it buds off of infected cells and moves into the surrounding tissue and structural details of HIV budding from cells within an infected tissue. The team also described several novel observations, including the existence of "pools" of HIV in between cells, evidence that HIV can infect new cells both by direct contact or by free viruses in the same tissue, and that pools of HIV can be found deep in the gut.

"The study suggests that an infected cell releases newly formed viruses in a semisynchronous wave pattern," explains Ladinsky. "It doesn't look like one virus buds off and then another in a random way. Rather, it appears that groups of virus bud off from a given cell within a certain time frame and then, a little while later, another group does the same, and then another, and so on."

The team came to this conclusion by identifying single infected cells using electron microscopy. Then they looked for HIV particles at different distances from the original cell and saw that the groups of particles were more mature as their distance from the infected cell increased.

"This finding showed that indeed these cells were producing waves of virus rather than individual ones, which was a neat observation," says Ladinsky.

In addition to producing waves of virus, infected cells are also thought to spread HIV through direct contact with their neighbors. Bjorkman and Ladinsky were able to visualize this phenomenon, known as a virological synapse, using electron microscopy.

"We were able to see one cell producing a viral bud that is contacting the cell next to it, suggesting that it's about to infect directly," Ladinsky says. "The space between those two cells represents the virological synapse."

Finally, the team found pools of HIV accumulating between cells where there was no indication of a virological synapse. This suggested that a virological synapse, which may be protected from some of the body's immune defenses, is not the only way in which HIV can infect new cells. The finding of HIV transfer via free pools of free virus offers hope that treatment with protein-based drugs, such as antibodies, could be an effective means of augmenting or replacing current treatment regimens that use small-molecule antiretroviral drugs.

"We saw these pools of virus in places where we had not initially expected to see them, down deep in the intestine," he explains. "Most of the immune cells in the gut are found higher up, so finding large amounts of the virus in the crypt regions was surprising."

The team will continue their efforts to look at HIV and related viruses under natural conditions using additional animal models, and potentially people.

"The end goal is to look at a native infection in human tissue to get a real picture of how it's working inside the body, and hopefully make a positive difference in fighting this epidemic," says Bjorkman.

Additional authors on the PLOS Pathogens paper, "Electron Tomography of HIV-1 Infection in Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue," are Collin Kieffer, a postdoctoral scholar in biology at Caltech; Gregory Olson and Douglas S. Kwon from the Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), MIT, and Harvard; and Maud Deruaz, Vladimir Vrbanac, and Andrew M. Tager from MGH and Harvard Medical School. The work was supported by the Center for the Structural Biology of Cellular Host Elements in Egress, Trafficking and Assembly of HIV (CHEETAH).

 

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Katie Neith
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Worry on the Brain

Caltech researchers pinpoint neural circuitry that promotes stress-induced anxiety

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, over 18 percent of American adults suffer from anxiety disorders, characterized as excessive worry or tension that often leads to other physical symptoms. Previous studies of anxiety in the brain have focused on the amygdala, an area known to play a role in fear. But a team of researchers led by biologists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) had a hunch that understanding a different brain area, the lateral septum (LS), could provide more clues into how the brain processes anxiety. Their instincts paid off—using mouse models, the team has found a neural circuit that connects the LS with other brain structures in a manner that directly influences anxiety.

"Our study has identified a new neural circuit that plays a causal role in promoting anxiety states," says David Anderson, the Seymour Benzer Professor of Biology at Caltech, and corresponding author of the study. "Part of the reason we lack more effective and specific drugs for anxiety is that we don't know enough about how the brain processes anxiety. This study opens up a new line of investigation into the brain circuitry that controls anxiety."

The team's findings are described in the January 30 version of the journal Cell.

Led by Todd Anthony, a senior research fellow at Caltech, the researchers decided to investigate the so-called septohippocampal axis because previous studies had implicated this circuit in anxiety, and had also shown that neurons in a structure located within this axis—the LS—lit up, or were activated, when anxious behavior was induced by stress in mouse models. But does the fact that the LS is active in response to stressors mean that this structure promotes anxiety, or does it mean that this structure acts to limit anxiety responses following stress? The prevailing view in the field was that the nerve pathways that connect the LS with different brain regions function as a brake on anxiety, to dampen a response to stressors. But the team's experiments showed that the exact opposite was true in their system.

In the new study, the team used optogenetics—a technique that uses light to control neural activity—to artificially activate a set of specific, genetically identified neurons in the LS of mice. During this activation, the mice became more anxious. Moreover, the researchers found that even a brief, transient activation of those neurons could produce a state of anxiety lasting for at least half an hour. This indicates that not only are these cells involved in the initial activation of an anxious state, but also that an anxious state persists even after the neurons are no longer being activated.

"The counterintuitive feature of these neurons is that even though activating them causes more anxiety, the neurons are actually inhibitory neurons, meaning that we would expect them to shut off other neurons in the brain," says Anderson, who is also an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI).

So, if these neurons are shutting off other neurons in the brain, then how can they increase anxiety? The team hypothesized that the process might involve a double-inhibitory mechanism: two negatives make a positive. When they took a closer look at exactly where the LS neurons were making connections in the brain, they saw that they were inhibiting other neurons in a nearby area called the hypothalamus. Importantly, most of those hypothalamic neurons were, themselves, inhibitory neurons. Moreover, those hypothalamic inhibitory neurons, in turn, connected with a third brain structure called the paraventricular nucleus, or PVN. The PVN is well known to control the release of hormones like cortisol in response to stress and has been implicated in anxiety.

This anatomical circuit seemed to provide a potential double-inhibitory pathway through which activation of the inhibitory LS neurons could lead to an increase in stress and anxiety. The team reasoned that if this hypothesis were true, then artificial activation of LS neurons would be expected to cause an increase in stress hormone levels, as if the animal were stressed. Indeed, optogenetic activation of the LS neurons increased the level of circulating stress hormones, consistent with the idea that the PVN was being activated. Moreover, inhibition of LS projections to the hypothalamus actually reduced the rise in cortisol when the animals were exposed to stress. Together these results strongly supported the double-negative hypothesis.

"The most surprising part of these findings is that the outputs from the LS, which were believed primarily to act as a brake on anxiety, actually increase anxiety," says Anderson.

Knowing the sign—positive or negative—of the effect of these cells on anxiety, he says, is a critical first step to understanding what kind of drug one might want to develop to manipulate these cells or their molecular constituents. If the cells had been found to inhibit anxiety, as originally thought, then one would want to find drugs that activate these LS neurons, to reduce anxiety. However, since the group found that these neurons instead promote anxiety, then to reduce anxiety a drug would have to inhibit these neurons.

"We are still probably a decade away from translating this very basic research into any kind of therapy for humans, but we hope that the information that this type of study yields about the brain will put the field and medicine in a much better position to develop new, rational therapies for psychiatric disorders," says Anderson. "There have been very few new psychiatric drugs developed in the last 40 to 50 years, and that's because we know so little about the brain circuitry that controls the emotions that go wrong in a psychiatric disorder like depression or anxiety."

The team will continue to map out this area of the brain in greater detail to understand more about its role in controlling stress-induced anxiety.

"There is no shortage of new questions that have been raised by these findings," Anderson says. "It may seem like all that we've done here is dissect a tiny little piece of brain circuitry, but it's a foothold onto a very big mountain. You have to start climbing someplace."

Additional authors on the Cell paper, "Control of Stress-Induced Persistent Anxiety by an Extra-Amygdala Septohypothalamic Circuit," are Walter Lerchner from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Nick Dee and Amy Bernard from the Allen Institute for Brain Science, and Nathaniel Heintz from The Rockefeller University and HHMI. The work was supported by NIH, HHMI, and the Beckman Institute at Caltech.

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Katie Neith
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