Caltech completes $111 million fundraising effort for the biological sciences

The California Institute of Technology has successfully completed a $111 million fundraising effort begun in 1998 to expand the biological sciences. The $111 million exceeds the original $100 million goal.

Funds raised during the Biological Sciences Initiative (BSI) will make possible a new building on the Pasadena campus, new professorships and fellowships, new faculty appointments, and a wide range of new research programs.

New research shows that brain is involvedin visual afterimages

If you stare at a bright red disk for a time and then glance away, you'll soon see a green disk of the same size appear and then disappear. The perceived disk is known as an afterimage, and has long been thought to be an effect of the "bleaching" of photochemical pigments or adaptation of neurons in the retina and merely a part of the ocular machinery that makes vision possible.

Caltech biologist David Chan selectedas Rita Allen Foundation Scholar

David C. Chan, an assistant professor of biology at the California Institute of Technology, has been named a Rita Allen Foundation Scholar. The award carries a $50,000 stipend for up to three years.

Chan specializes in research on mitochondria, components of the cell important in energy metabolism and also in programmed cell death. Specifically, he investigates the manner in which cells coordinate mitochondrial functions with the development of tissues and organs.

Survival of the Fittest . . . Or the Flattest?

Computer "organisms" challenge conventional Darwinian thinking

Factors causing high mutations could have led to origin of sexual reproduction, study shows

Biologists have long known the advantages of sexual reproduction to the evolution and survival of species. With a little sex, a fledgling creature is more likely to pass on the good mutations it may have, and more able to deal with the sort of environmental adversity that would send its asexual neighbors floundering into the shallow end of the gene pool.

Hensen's node in chicken embryos governs movement of neural cells, study shows

For us living creatures with backbones, existence begins as a single fertilized cell that then subdivides and grows into a fetus with many, many cells. But the details of how those cells end up as discrete organs instead of undifferentiated heaps of cells is only now being understood in microscopic detail.

Why, for example, should some of the cells migrate to the region that will become the brain, while others travel netherward to make a spinal cord?

Caltech Uses Fluorescent Protein to Visualize the Work of Living Neurons

Proving that protein synthesis occurs in intact dendrites

Caltech Professor Pamela Bjorkman Elected To National Academy of Sciences

Pamela Bjorkman, professor of and executive officer for biology at the California Institute of Technology, is one of 72 American scientists elected this year to membership in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). The announcement was made earlier this month in Washington at the 138th annual meeting of the academy.

Caltech President Honored for Pioneering Work Leading to Cancer Therapy

PASADENA, Calif. — David Baltimore, the president of the California Institute of Technology, was one of five scientists to receive the 13th annual Warren Alpert Foundation Scientific Prize today, May 1, for research that ultimately led to a new groundbreaking cancer therapy.

The prize, awarded at a ceremony at Boston's Four Seasons Hotel, recognizes the significance of STI571, a new cancer therapy that has shown remarkable effectiveness against chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in clinical trials.

Owls perform a type of multiplicationin locating ground prey in dark, study shows

Owls have long been known for their stunning ability to swoop down in total darkness and grab unsuspecting prey for a midnight snack.

In the April 13 issue of the journal Science, neuroscientists from the California Institute of Technology report that an owl locates prey in the dark by processing two auditory signal cues to "compute" the position of the prey. This computation takes place in the midbrain and involves about a thousand specialized neurons.

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