Caltech Biologists Pursue Promising New Approach in Treatment of HIV/AIDS and Cancer

In response to the arduously slow progress in finding cures for AIDS and cancer, Caltech researchers are now investigating a promising new approach in the treatment of these diseases.

Memory Lane in the Brain

Biologist Erin Schuman is interested in how memories are formed--or forgotten. The landscape the professor of biology at the California Institute of Technology explores is the hippocampus, the part of the brain known to be crucial for memory in humans and other animals.

New Target for Future Therapeutic Drugs

PASADENA, Calif. - "Sometimes letting nature tell you what's important is the better way to go," says Raymond Deshaies, an associate professor of biology at the California Institute of Technology. Deshaies is referring to new work to come out of his lab and the lab of Randall King at Harvard that defies conventional thinking--they've discovered a chemical that stops a key cell function, but, more importantly, suggests a new possible target within a cell, once thought to be untenable, for future therapeutic drugs.

Caltech Bioinformatics Experts DevelopNew Literature Search Engine for Biologists

When it comes to finding a used book on the Internet, one merely needs to Google the title, and a few suitable items for sale will soon be just a click away. But for the biologist or medical researcher looking for information on how two nematode genes interrelate in hopes of better understanding human disease, there is a clear need for a more focused search engine.

Research uncovers new facts about odor detection in insects; findings could lead to more effective repellents

If you think it doesn't do much good to swipe the fly that's going after the potato salad, guess again. You may be discouraging the fly's colleagues from taking up the raid.

Caltech Professor Awarded Stein and Moore Award for Insights Into the Life Cycle of Cells

Ubiquitin is a small protein that has a very big job. Or jobs, to be more accurate. Indeed, the ubiquitin system is central to--literally--just about everything significant that goes on inside cells, and to a lot of intercellular business as well. Once unknown and, until the 1980s, unheralded, the ubiquitin system is now one of the major areas of study in cell biology, biochemistry, and genetics, and the point of convergence for many disparate disciplines.

Fish, Frog, and Fly Share a Molecular Mechanism to Control Embryonic Growth

PASADENA, Calif. — Oriented cell division is a fundamental process in developing organisms, whether you are a worm, a fruit fly--or a human. As an embryo begins to grow, cells divide again and again, from the single fertilized egg to the countless cells present at birth.

New Class of Reagents Developed by Caltech Chemical Biologists for In Vivo Protein Tracking

One of the big problems in biology is keeping track of the proteins a cell makes, without having to kill the cell. Now, researchers from the California Institute of Technology have developed a general approach that measures protein production in living cells.

Caltech Nobel Laureate Ed Lewis Dies

PASADENA—Edward Lewis, winner of the 1995 Nobel Prize for his groundbreaking studies of how genes regulate the development of specific regions of the body, died Wednesday, July 21, 2004, at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena after a long battle with cancer. He was 86.

Neuroscientists Demonstrate New Way to Control Prosthetic Device with Brain Signals

Another milestone has been achieved in the quest to create prosthetic devices operated by brain activity. In the July 9 issue of the journal Science, California Institute of Technology neuroscientists Sam Musallam, Brian Corneil, Bradley Greger, Hans Scherberger, and Richard Andersen report on the Andersen lab's success in getting monkeys to move the cursor on a computer screen by merely thinking about a goal they would like to achieve, and assigning a value to the goal.

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