Gaining a Better Understanding of the Brain

PASADENA, Calif. — A panel of experts who conduct a wide range of brain research will come together for California Institute of Technology's annual Biology Forum, "Gray Matters: Perception, Intention, Memory, and Dysfunction in the Brain," April 25 at 8 p.m. in Beckman Auditorium, 332 S. Michigan Ave, Pasadena.

Caltech and Purdue scientists determinestructure of the Dengue fever virus

Scientists at the California Institute of Technology and Purdue University have determined the fine-detail structure of the virus that causes dengue fever. This advance could lead to newer and more focused strategies for devising a vaccine to protect the world against a viral illness that causes 20,000 deaths each year.

Reporting in the March 8 issue of the journal Cell, Caltech biology professor James H. Strauss, lead author Richard J. Kuhn of Purdue (a former postdoctoral scholar in Strauss's lab), and Michael G. Rossman and Timothy S. Baker, both of Purdue, describe

Caltech Scientists Block Effect of Huntington Disease Protein in Cultured Cells

Caltech researchers have blocked the effects of the disease in cultured cells using antibodies.

Caltech biologists invent newer, better methodfor making transgenic animals

Using specially prepared HIV-derived viruses stripped of their disease-causing potential, California Institute of Technology biologist David Baltimore and his team have invented a new method of introducing foreign DNA into animals that could have wide-ranging applications in biotechnology and experimental biology.

The Baltimore team reports, on today's Science Express Web site, on their study of single-cell mouse embryos that have been virally infected in a manner that leaves a new gene from a jellyfish permanently deposited into their genomes.

Sound alters the activity of visual areas in the human brain,Caltech research reveals

Scientists at the California Institute of Technology have discovered that hearing can significantly change visual perception, and that the influence of hearing on visual perception occurs at an early perceptual level rather than at a higher cognitive level.

Ladan Shams, a Caltech postdoctoral researcher, and Shinsuke Shimojo, a professor of computation and neural systems at Caltech report that visual signals are influenced significantly by sounds at early cortical levels that have been believed to be "vision specific."

Caltech biologist Barbara Woldnamed Beckman Institute director

Caltech biology professor Barbara Wold has been appointed director of the Beckman Institute, President David Baltimore announced today. She succeeds founding director Harry Gray, who will return to full-time professorial duties after 15 years at the institute's helm.

Wold, who specializes in embryonic development and regeneration in vertebrates, will lead the Beckman Institute in its continuing goal of building a research interface between chemistry and biology, Baltimore said.

Caltech completes $111 million fundraising effort for the biological sciences

The California Institute of Technology has successfully completed a $111 million fundraising effort begun in 1998 to expand the biological sciences. The $111 million exceeds the original $100 million goal.

Funds raised during the Biological Sciences Initiative (BSI) will make possible a new building on the Pasadena campus, new professorships and fellowships, new faculty appointments, and a wide range of new research programs.

New research shows that brain is involvedin visual afterimages

If you stare at a bright red disk for a time and then glance away, you'll soon see a green disk of the same size appear and then disappear. The perceived disk is known as an afterimage, and has long been thought to be an effect of the "bleaching" of photochemical pigments or adaptation of neurons in the retina and merely a part of the ocular machinery that makes vision possible.

Caltech biologist David Chan selectedas Rita Allen Foundation Scholar

David C. Chan, an assistant professor of biology at the California Institute of Technology, has been named a Rita Allen Foundation Scholar. The award carries a $50,000 stipend for up to three years.

Chan specializes in research on mitochondria, components of the cell important in energy metabolism and also in programmed cell death. Specifically, he investigates the manner in which cells coordinate mitochondrial functions with the development of tissues and organs.

Survival of the Fittest . . . Or the Flattest?

Computer "organisms" challenge conventional Darwinian thinking

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