Caltech Professor Awarded Stein and Moore Award for Insights Into the Life Cycle of Cells

Ubiquitin is a small protein that has a very big job. Or jobs, to be more accurate. Indeed, the ubiquitin system is central to--literally--just about everything significant that goes on inside cells, and to a lot of intercellular business as well. Once unknown and, until the 1980s, unheralded, the ubiquitin system is now one of the major areas of study in cell biology, biochemistry, and genetics, and the point of convergence for many disparate disciplines.

Fish, Frog, and Fly Share a Molecular Mechanism to Control Embryonic Growth

PASADENA, Calif. — Oriented cell division is a fundamental process in developing organisms, whether you are a worm, a fruit fly--or a human. As an embryo begins to grow, cells divide again and again, from the single fertilized egg to the countless cells present at birth.

New Class of Reagents Developed by Caltech Chemical Biologists for In Vivo Protein Tracking

One of the big problems in biology is keeping track of the proteins a cell makes, without having to kill the cell. Now, researchers from the California Institute of Technology have developed a general approach that measures protein production in living cells.

Caltech Nobel Laureate Ed Lewis Dies

PASADENA—Edward Lewis, winner of the 1995 Nobel Prize for his groundbreaking studies of how genes regulate the development of specific regions of the body, died Wednesday, July 21, 2004, at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena after a long battle with cancer. He was 86.

Neuroscientists Demonstrate New Way to Control Prosthetic Device with Brain Signals

Another milestone has been achieved in the quest to create prosthetic devices operated by brain activity. In the July 9 issue of the journal Science, California Institute of Technology neuroscientists Sam Musallam, Brian Corneil, Bradley Greger, Hans Scherberger, and Richard Andersen report on the Andersen lab's success in getting monkeys to move the cursor on a computer screen by merely thinking about a goal they would like to achieve, and assigning a value to the goal.

"Minis" Have Mega Impact in the Brain

Embargoed: Not for Release Until 11:00 a.m. PDT Thursday, 24 June, 2004

PASADENA, Calif. — The brain is a maddeningly complex organ for scientists to understand. No assumption can remain unchallenged, no given taken as a given.

The Brain Can Make Errors in Reassembling the Color and Motion of Objects

You're driving along in your car and catch a glimpse of a green SUV out of the corner of your eye. A few seconds later, you glance over, and to your surprise discover that the SUV is actually brown.

Two Caltech Faculty Receive Franklin Medals

PASADENA—Two members of the California Institute of Technology faculty, chemist Harry Gray and biologist Seymour Benzer, are among this year's recipients of the prestigious Benjamin Franklin Medals.

Researchers discover fundamental scaling rule that differentiates primate and carnivore brains

Everybody from the Tarzan fan to the evolutionary biologist knows that our human brain is more like a chimpanzee's than a dog's. But is our brain also more like a tiny lemur's than a lion's?

Zombie Behaviors Are Part of Everyday Life, According to Neurobiologists

PASADENA, Ca.--When you're close to that woman you love this Valentine's Day, her fragrance may cause you to say to yourself, "Hmmm, Chanel No. 5," especially if you're the suave, sophisticated kind. Or if you're more of a missing link, you may even say to yourself, "Me want woman." In either case, you're exhibiting a zombie behavior, according to the two scientists who pioneered the scientific study of consciousness.

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