Neuroscientists Discover the Neurons That Act As Novelty Detectors in the Human Brain

By studying epileptic patients awaiting brain surgery, neuroscientists for the first time have located single neurons that are involved in recognizing whether a stimulus is new or old. The discovery demonstrates that the human brain not only has neurons for processing new information never seen before, but also neurons to recognize old information that has been seen just once.

Caltech Scientists Discover the Part of the Brain That Causes Some People to Be Lousy in Math

Most everyone knows that the term "dyslexia" refers to people who can't keep words and letters straight. A rarer term is "dyscalculia," which describes someone who is virtually unable to deal with numbers, much less do complicated math.

Researchers Create New "Matchmaking Service" Computer System to Study Gene Interactions

Biologists in recent years have identified every individual gene in the genomes of several organisms. While this has been quite an accomplishment in itself, the further goal of figuring out how these genes interact is truly daunting.

Caltech Scientists Gain Fundamental Insight into How Cells Protect Genetic Blueprints

Molecular biologists have known for some time that there is a so-called checkpoint control mechanism that keeps our cells from dividing until they have copied all the DNA in their genetic code. Similar mechanisms prevent cells from dividing with damaged DNA, which forms, for example, in one's skin after a sunburn. Without such genetic fidelity mechanisms, cells would divide with missing or defective genes.

Old-World Primates Evolved Color Vision to Better See Each Other Blush, Study Reveals

Your emotions can easily be read by others when you blush—at least by others familiar with your skin color. What's more, the blood rushing out of your face when you're terrified is just as telling. And when it comes to our evolutionary cousins the chimpanzees, they not only can see color changes in each other's faces, but in each other's rumps as well.

Caltech Launches Brain Study Program with $8.9 Million Gift from Eli Broad to Fund 24 Researchers and Six New Labs

For years, scientists have worked to study each of the 100 billion neurons in the human brain. But while they understand individual neurons, they've been stumped by how neurons work together, how they encode information, and how they generate thoughts, emotions, and actions.

Baltimore Is President-Elect of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

David Baltimore, president of the California Institute of Technology since 1997, has been chosen to serve as president-elect of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Baltimore will begin his term as president-elect on February 21, at the close of the 2006 annual AAAS meeting, and will begin his one-year term as president in February 2007.

Deciphering the Mystery of Bee Flight

One of the most elusive questions in science has finally been answered: How do bees fly?

Modified Mice Test Alzheimer's Disease Drugs

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive brain disorder that afflicts an estimated 4.5 million Americans and that is characterized by the presence of dense clumps of a small peptide called amyloid-beta in the spaces between neurons.

Caltech Researchers Join Global GEM4 Initiative

Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have joined a global medical effort to address a number of diseases through innovative, multi-institutional, multidisciplinary approaches. The initiative, the Global Enterprise for Micromechanics and Molecular Medicine (GEM4), is centered at MIT's Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and was officially launched October 12 at an MIT campus ceremony.

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