Latest Stories

04/16/2014 14:25:50
Katie Neith
As reported in a paper published online today in the journal Nature, Caltech biologist David J. Anderson and his colleagues have genetically identified neurons that control aggressive behavior in the mouse hypothalamus, a structure that lies deep in the brain. Researchers have long known that innate social behaviors like mating and aggression are closely related, but the specific neurons in the brain that control these behaviors had not been identified until now.
03/13/2014 16:34:01
Cynthia Eller

Mark Simons, professor of geophysics at Caltech, along with graduate student Brent Minchew, recently logged over 40 hours of flight time mapping the surface of Iceland's glaciers.

03/13/2014 12:00:09
Kathy Svitil
In the newly created position, Jergovic will collaborate closely with the president and provost, and with the division chairs, faculty, and senior leadership on campus and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to execute and integrate Caltech's strategic initiatives and projects and ensure that they complement and support the overall education and research missions of the campus and JPL. This appointment returns the number of vice presidents at the Institute to six.
03/13/2014 09:01:14
Kimm Fesenmaier
"The thing that makes this study really interesting is that we did our calculations before we ever did any experiments," says Rob Phillips, the Fred and Nancy Morris Professor of Biophysics and Biology at Caltech.
03/12/2014 09:01:47
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
In the recent study the researchers found that beneficial gut bacteria were necessary for the development of innate immune cells—specialized types of white blood cells that serve as the body's first line of defense against invading pathogens.
An artist’s representation of gut microbes promoting hematopoiesis.
03/10/2014 10:40:46
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
Imagine that you are in a meeting with coworkers or at a gathering of friends. You pull out your cell phone to show a presentation or a video on YouTube. But you don't use the tiny screen; your phone projects a bright, clear image onto a wall or a big screen. Such a technology may be on its way, thanks to a new light-bending silicon chip.
An image of Hajimiri's light-bending silicon chip.
03/07/2014 07:56:06
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
In the 1970s, Caltech researcher Aron Kuppermann found additional computer resources in an unlikely place: a local religious organization. In the same spirit of creativity, Caltech researchers today have also found ways to practice resourceful computing.
03/06/2014 17:24:42
Brian Bell
Frances H. Arnold, the Dick and Barbara Dickinson Professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering and Biochemistry, and director of the Donna and Benjamin M. Rosen Bioengineering Center at Caltech, is one of five living innovators chosen to be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014.
03/04/2014 10:15:30
Kimm Fesenmaier
Caltech has recognized six of its graduates with the Distinguished Alumni Award, the highest honor the Institute bestows upon its alumni. This year's recipients are James S.W. Wong (PhD '65), Mary Baker (MS '67, PhD '72), Paul J. Steinhardt (BS '74), Richard K. Miller (PhD '76), Richard H. Scheller (PhD '80), and David E. Chavez (BS '96).
02/28/2014 11:25:03
Cynthia Eller

Steven C. Frautschi, professor of theoretical physics, emeritus, at Caltech, has been awarded the Richard P. Feynman Prize for Excellence in Teaching—Caltech's most prestigious teaching honor.

02/21/2014 18:26:11
Cynthia Eller
Erik Winfree, professor of computer science, computation and neutral systems, and bioengineering, explains, "I tend to think of cells as really small robots. Biology has programmed natural cells, but now engineers are starting to think about how we can program artificial cells."
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