News articles tagged with "brain"

04/10/2015 09:49:09
Lori Dajose
Yuki Oka, an assistant professor of biology, has been named a 2015 Searle Scholar. Fifteen scholars are named annually, each receiving $100,000 per year for three years.
06/30/2014 14:11:10
Katie Neith
Building on previous studies targeting the amygdala, a team of researchers has found that some brain cells recognize emotions based on the viewer's preconceptions rather than the true emotion being expressed.
06/05/2014 02:00:48
Cynthia Eller
Researchers at Caltech found that chimps at the Kyoto University Primate Research Institute consistently outperform humans in simple contests drawn from game theory.
04/28/2014 13:43:46
Katie Neith
Building on their prior work, a team of neuroscientists at Caltech now report that rare patients who are missing connections between the left and right sides of their brain show a strikingly high incidence of autism.
04/16/2014 14:25:50
Katie Neith
Caltech biologist David J. Anderson and his colleagues have genetically identified neurons that control aggressive behavior in the mouse hypothalamus.
04/02/2014 18:35:26
Cynthia Eller
Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering Mikhail Shapiro is determined to reveal the mysteries of the brain in situ, in living beings, right down to the cellular level.
03/31/2014 14:41:52
Douglas Smith
On Wednesday, April 2, Professor of Biology Sarkis Mazmanian will introduce you to the array of bacteria—your microbiome—residing on your skin, in your mouth, and even deep in your guts.
02/05/2014 09:00:07
Kimm Fesenmaier
Caltech researchers have, for the first time, pinpointed areas of the brain that seem to serve as “arbitrators” between two decision-making systems, weighing the reliability of the predictions each makes and then allocating control accordingly.
01/30/2014 09:09:08
Katie Neith
Caltech researchers have pinpointed the neural circuitry that promotes stress-induced anxiety.
01/16/2014 09:02:47
Katie Neith
According to the latest studies from the fly laboratory of Caltech biologist David Anderson, male fruit flies fight more than their female counterparts because they have special cells in their brains that promote fighting. These cells appear to be absent in the brains of female fruit flies.
12/27/2013 10:21:27
Cynthia Eller
Subjects were asked to observe the shifting value of a hypothetical financial asset and make predictions about whether it would go up or down, while simultaneously interacting with an "expert" who was also making predictions.
Subscribe to Caltech News tagged with "brain"