News articles tagged with "Watson_Lecture"

03/31/2014 14:41:52
Douglas Smith
On Wednesday, April 2, Professor of Biology Sarkis Mazmanian will introduce you to the array of bacteria—your microbiome—residing on your skin, in your mouth, and even deep in your guts. Millions of years of coevolution have inextricably linked you and your microbiome, whose chemical "factories" help keep you healthy by doing such things as synthesizing vitamins and digesting your food. Recently, Mazmanian's laboratory has uncovered the surprising roles they play in fending off certain diseases. The talk begins at 8:00 p.m. in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
02/11/2013 14:14:33
Douglas Smith
What makes an earthquake go off? Why are earthquakes so difficult to forecast? Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Geophysics Nadia Lapusta gives us a close-up look at the moving parts, as it were, at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 13, 2013, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
01/26/2013 18:47:21
Douglas Smith
Getting married and moving out of your parents' house may be key to your personal economic development, but are marriage patterns key to an entire society's development as well? Professor of Social Science History Tracy Dennison tells us what love's got to do with it at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 30, 2013, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
01/22/2013 09:40:51
Douglas Smith

If you hit something hard enough, it will break, and the consequences can be catastrophic.

01/05/2013 14:59:21
Douglas Smith
Professor of Physics Harvey Newman has been searching for signs of dark matter, extra dimensions, and the elusive Higgs particle at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. He'll be reporting from the high-energy frontier of particle physics at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 9, 2013, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
12/04/2012 20:58:21
Douglas Smith
Viviana Gradinaru (BS '05) might one day be getting inside your head—but in a good way. An assistant professor of biology at Caltech, Gradinaru is trying to map out the brain's wiring diagrams. Gradinaru will discuss her work at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 5 in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
11/25/2012 21:05:01
Douglas Smith
José Andrade has got the dirt on dirt. An associate professor of civil and mechanical engineering at Caltech, Andrade will discuss how the actions of a few grains of sand can affect landslides, earthquakes, and even Mars rovers. He will be speaking at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 28, 2012, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
10/29/2012 11:10:37
Douglas Smith
Guruswami (Ravi) Ravichandran is an expert on breakups—of ceramics and metals, not relationships. The John E. Goode, Jr., Professor of Aerospace and professor of mechanical engineering and the director of the Graduate Aerospace Laboratories at Caltech, Ravichandran will talk about his work at the leading edge of impact mechanics on Wednesday, October 24, at 8:00 p.m. in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
08/28/2012 07:00:00
Douglas Smith

"Turbulence is everywhere," says Beverley McKeon—from continent-spanning weather systems down to the swirls of air your car leaves behind itself as you drive. "I think about things like ships, planes, and pipelines," she explains, noting that about half of the energy consumed by each of those three transportation systems goes to counteract turbulence-induced drag.

 

07/06/2012 07:00:00
Douglas Smith

"I grew up cooking, waiting tables, and doing dishes in the family diner in Chicago," says Jonas Peters. These days, as Caltech's Bren Professor of Chemistry, Peters is more an executive chef than a spatula jockey: he coordinates the menu and helps dream up the recipes for new molecules, but his students whip them up and wash the glassware.

06/22/2012 07:00:00
Douglas Smith

Were dinosaurs slow and stupid, as used to be the prevailing wisdom, or nimble and smart enough to eat an attorney, as in the 1993 film Jurassic Park? The answer depends largely on whether the T. Rex in question is cold blooded, like an alligator, or warm blooded, like a bird. 

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