Innovation News

05/28/2015 15:44:00
Stacey Hong
The new, collaborative research agreement will help support research, graduate student training, and provide shared resources.
01/30/2015 15:59:13
A joint analysis of data from the Planck space mission and the ground-based experiment BICEP2 has found no conclusive evidence of gravitational waves from the birth of our universe.
01/29/2015 09:23:04
Kimm Fesenmaier
Caltech researchers have developed antibody-based molecules that are hundreds of times better than our natural defenses at binding to and neutralizing the HIV virus.
01/27/2015 09:44:41
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
New Assistant Professor of Biology Yuki Oka studies the behavioral triggers for thirst and maintaining bodily homeostasis for survival.
01/21/2015 15:08:53
Kimm Fesenmaier
SPIDER, an instrument carrying six Caltech-made telescopes, just landed after 16 days drifting in the wind above Antarctica searching for signs of inflation in the earliest moments of the universe.
01/07/2015 10:05:43
Ramanuj Basu
Caltech researchers discover a light signal that hints at an extremely close pair of super-massive black holes.
12/23/2014 09:43:56
Lori Dajose
Professors Frances Arnold, David Baltimore, Carver Mead, and Axel Scherer have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).
12/15/2014 10:15:30
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
Choosing foods that are good for you may be a matter of getting your brain to focus on nutritional info . . . and quickly.
12/11/2014 09:16:35
In case you missed any of them, here are 14 stories of the discoveries, methods, and technologies that came to life at Caltech in 2014.
11/26/2014 09:31:34
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
Solar panels convert visible light from the sun into electricity—but the sun's infrared light passes right through the panel's silicon material. Caltech researchers have come up with a method that may be able to harness that lost energy.
11/20/2014 11:01:20
Kimm Fesenmaier
A team of researchers has discovered an ancient, deep canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet. The geologists say that the ancient canyon—thousands of feet deep in places—effectively rules out a popular model used to explain how the massive and picturesque gorges of the Himalayas became so steep, so fast.
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