Advanced Materials and Nanoscience News

08/21/2014 13:22:29
Kathy Svitil
The annual prize recognizes researchers who have made "an outstanding and innovative contribution" to the field of applied physics.
11/12/2012 20:12:54
Douglas Smith
David G. Goodwin, professor of mechanical engineering and applied physics, emeritus, passed away at his home in Pasadena on Sunday, November 11, 2012, after a five-year battle with brain cancer and a struggle with Parkinson's disease that began in 1998. He was 55 years old.
10/29/2012 09:16:50
Brian Bell

Julia Greer is going to need to find space in her office for all of the awards, medals, and grant acceptance letters she has been receiving lately.

10/17/2012 09:26:18
Kimm Fesenmaier
Setting the stage for a new class of motional sensors, Caltech researchers have developed a new ultrasensitive, microchip-scale accelerometer that uses laser light to measure displacement.
10/01/2012 15:50:43
Kimm Fesenmaier

Caltech engineers and scientists often work at the frontiers of science—pushing the limits of what is known and what is possible.

08/26/2012 07:00:00
Marcus Woo

A team led by scientists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has made the first-ever mechanical device that can measure the mass of individual molecules one at a time.

05/22/2012 07:00:00
Kimm Fesenmaier

Caltech engineers and applied scientists are poking, prodding, and modeling materials on all scales to develop the understanding needed to build the next generation of armor. As part of a newly-funded Army collaboration, six Caltech researchers will investigate what happens to protective materials during intense impact. 

 

03/22/2012 07:00:00
Marcus Woo

In the continual quest for better thermoelectric materials—which convert heat into electricity and vice versa—researchers have identified a liquid-like compound whose properties give it the potential to be even more efficient than traditional thermoelectrics.

02/27/2012 08:00:00
Kimm Fesenmaier

Bacteria have evolved different systems for secreting proteins. One, called a type VI secretion system, is found in about a quarter of all bacteria with two membranes. Despite being common, researchers have not understood how it works. Now a team, co-led by researchers at Caltech, has figured out the structure of the type VI secretion system apparatus and proposed how it might work—by shooting spring-loaded poison molecular daggers.

01/06/2012 19:00:00
Kimm Fesenmaier

Three new faculty members in the Division of Engineering and Applied Science (EAS) have big ideas about really small things. Assistant professors Hyuck Choo, Dennis Kochmann, and Austin Minnich focus on quite different challenges, but they all home in on the nanoscale, where they manipulate, model, and measure structures and phenomena at the level of individual atoms.

12/15/2011 08:00:00
Kimm Fesenmaier

It has been 25 years since scientists discovered the first high-temperature superconductors—copper oxides, or cuprates, that conduct electricity without a shred of resistance at temperatures much higher than other superconducting metals. Now, two Caltech chemists have developed a hypothesis to explain the strange behavior of these materials, while also pointing the way to a method for making even higher-temperature superconductors. 

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