Advanced Materials and Nanoscience News

12/15/2014 09:46:33
Douglas Smith
Integrating optics and electronics into systems such as fiber-optic data links has revolutionized how we transmit information. A second revolution awaits as researchers seek to develop chips in which individual atoms control the movement of light within the chip through optical "wires," and photons could replace electrons as the vehicle for performing computations. Andrei Faraon (BS '04), an assistant professor of applied physics and materials science in the Division of Engineering and Applied Science, presents a preview of this revolution at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, December 17, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
An optical bench in the Faraon lab.
01/22/2013 09:40:51
Douglas Smith
At Caltech, Guruswami "Ravi" Ravichandran studies impacts that pack a wallop of up to a million times the pressure of Earth's atmosphere.
01/13/2013 16:09:32
Kimm Fesenmaier
The brain needs its surroundings to be just right. That is, unlike some internal organs, such as the liver, which can process just about anything that comes its way, the brain needs to be protected and to have a chemical environment with the right balance of proteins, sugars, salts, and other metabolites.
12/06/2012 17:03:05
Marcus Woo
As technology advances, it tends to shrink. From cell phones to laptops—powered by increasingly faster and tinier processors—everything is getting thinner and sleeker. And now light beams are getting smaller, too. Engineers at Caltech have created a device that can focus light into a point just a few nanometers (billionths of a meter) across.
11/25/2012 21:05:01
Douglas Smith
José Andrade has got the dirt on dirt. An associate professor of civil and mechanical engineering at Caltech, Andrade will discuss how the actions of a few grains of sand can affect landslides, earthquakes, and even Mars rovers. He will be speaking at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 28, 2012, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
11/15/2012 13:21:03
Kimm Fesenmaier
In order to build the next generation of nuclear reactors, materials scientists are trying to unlock the secrets of certain materials that are radiation-damage tolerant. Now Caltech researchers have brought new understanding to one of those secrets—how the interfaces between two carefully selected metals can absorb, or heal, radiation damage.
11/12/2012 20:12:54
Douglas Smith
David G. Goodwin, professor of mechanical engineering and applied physics, emeritus, passed away at his home in Pasadena on Sunday, November 11, 2012, after a five-year battle with brain cancer and a struggle with Parkinson's disease that began in 1998. He was 55 years old.
10/29/2012 09:16:50
Brian Bell

Julia Greer is going to need to find space in her office for all of the awards, medals, and grant acceptance letters she has been receiving lately.

10/17/2012 09:26:18
Kimm Fesenmaier
Setting the stage for a new class of motional sensors, Caltech researchers have developed a new ultrasensitive, microchip-scale accelerometer that uses laser light to measure displacement.
10/01/2012 15:50:43
Kimm Fesenmaier
Caltech engineers and scientists often work at the frontiers of science—pushing the limits of what is known and what is possible. Now, with its eighth annual Breakthrough Awards, Popular Mechanics magazine is recognizing two projects that fall into this category and in which Caltech faculty members have played major roles—the development of ultralight micro-lattices by materials scientist Julia Greer and colleagues, and the Voyager 1 and 2 missions, whose project scientist, physicist Ed Stone, has been at Caltech for the missions' entire 35-year ride.
08/26/2012 07:00:00
Marcus Woo

A team led by scientists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has made the first-ever mechanical device that can measure the mass of individual molecules one at a time.

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