Advanced Materials and Nanoscience News

08/21/2014 13:22:29
Kathy Svitil
The annual prize recognizes researchers who have made "an outstanding and innovative contribution" to the field of applied physics.
11/01/2013 15:39:21
Douglas Smith
Caltech's Axel Schere is miniaturizing medical equipment (without benefit of a shrink ray). He'll tell us how to make a sensor small enough to be injected into an artery.
09/05/2013 10:57:22
Kimm Fesenmaier
Caltech engineers have mimicked lightweight yet strong biological materials by creating nanostructured, hollow ceramic scaffolds, and have found that their small building blocks, or unit cells, display remarkable strength and resistance to failure despite being more than 85 percent air.
08/08/2013 13:52:39
Jessica Stoller-Conrad

Caltech professors Nai-Chang Yeh and Keith Schwab have been named codirectors of t

02/11/2013 14:14:33
Douglas Smith
What makes an earthquake go off? Why are earthquakes so difficult to forecast? Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Geophysics Nadia Lapusta gives us a close-up look at the moving parts, as it were, at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 13, 2013, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
02/07/2013 19:35:51
Kimm Fesenmaier
Laying the groundwork for an on-chip optical quantum network, a team of researchers, including Andrei Faraon from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), has shown that defects in diamond can be used as quantum building blocks that interact with one another via photons, the basic units of light.
01/22/2013 09:40:51
Douglas Smith

If you hit something hard enough, it will break, and the consequences can be catastrophic.

01/13/2013 16:09:32
Kimm Fesenmaier
The brain needs its surroundings to be just right. That is, unlike some internal organs, such as the liver, which can process just about anything that comes its way, the brain needs to be protected and to have a chemical environment with the right balance of proteins, sugars, salts, and other metabolites.
12/06/2012 17:03:05
Marcus Woo
As technology advances, it tends to shrink. From cell phones to laptops—powered by increasingly faster and tinier processors—everything is getting thinner and sleeker. And now light beams are getting smaller, too. Engineers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have created a device that can focus light into a point just a few nanometers (billionths of a meter) across—an achievement they say may lead to next-generation applications in computing, communications, and imaging.
11/25/2012 21:05:01
Douglas Smith
José Andrade has got the dirt on dirt. An associate professor of civil and mechanical engineering at Caltech, Andrade will discuss how the actions of a few grains of sand can affect landslides, earthquakes, and even Mars rovers. He will be speaking at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 28, 2012, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
11/15/2012 13:21:03
Kimm Fesenmaier
In order to build the next generation of nuclear reactors, materials scientists are trying to unlock the secrets of certain materials that are radiation-damage tolerant. Now Caltech researchers have brought new understanding to one of those secrets—how the interfaces between two carefully selected metals can absorb, or heal, radiation damage.
Subscribe to Caltech News tagged with "nanoscience + materials_science"